Free event to be held August 21, 2018 entitled “A Brief History of Portraiture”
Photographer and educator, Tim Meyer.
Photographer and educator, Tim Meyer.
Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
Enlarge Photo
Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
Enlarge Photo
Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
Enlarge Photo
Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
Enlarge Photo
Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
Enlarge Photo

The Ojai Photo Club will feature photographer and educator Tim Meyer as its presenter for August. The free event, “A Brief History of Portraiture,” will be held on August 21 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

Meyer will offer a fast-paced journey through the history of portraiture, spanning more than two millennia and including a wide variety of art media. With a lifetime of experience in photographic portraiture, he will discuss different artistic ap-proaches to creating portraits, from 600 BC to the present. He will illustrate how these styles have influenced the way we portray ourselves and how they continue to have an impact on contemporary photography.

Throughout his thirty-five plus years as a professional photographer, educator and author, Meyer has been internationally recognized and respected for his innovative style and technique. His photographic art has been displayed in both solo and group exhibitions and has earned multiple awards. His book, “The Portrait: Understanding Portrait Photography,” is published in four languages and has been adopted as a textbook in numerous colleges. A second book, “Light Shaping,” is also available worldwide.

As an academic educator, Meyer holds both an MA and MFA in art and photography. He taught full-time at Brooks Institute until its closure in 2016, and is currently an instructor at Mount St. Mary’s University, Los Angeles. In addition to many national education programs, he has lectured internationally in England, Germany and Mexico. His areas of expertise are portraiture and wedding photography; and basic, advanced and creative lighting.

Meyer’s industry achievements include the Professional Photographers of America’s Master and Craftsman degrees. He has served as a councilor for this organization from 2009 to the present.

Concurrent with his teaching, Meyer has maintained a successful portrait and wedding photography business in Santa Barbara. For more information and to view Meyer’s portfolio images go to: https://tmeyer.myportfolio.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may sub-mit images for review. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 


 

Resilient Women: The Art of Daggi Wallace
April 26 through Aug. 9
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

Painter and pastel artist Daggi Wallace is a member of the Studio Channel Islands community. This exhibition is a compilation of her most recent work including an exploration of water, a focus on the Berlin wall, and studies that relate to the #MeToo movement. Though it is not the case with her work in general, this exhibit focuses on portrayals of women.

Wallace was born in West Berlin close to the Berlin Wall in 1962. She uses the wall as a symbol for all the walls in life, including those internally built. She uses the wide-open spaces of the American Southwest and the freedom of bodies of water to reflect how she felt after immigrating to the United States.

“Focusing mainly on portraying the human condition and our connection to each other, my work always begins with a visual trigger that evokes a strong emotional response in me or with an idea I want to explore,” Wallace said.

Wallace’s paintings have been published in several books and magazines, including American Art Collector, Southwest Art, Professional Artist, International Artist, the Pastel Journal, Poets and Artists and Pratique Des Arts.

Cal Lutheran students Christine Dauzat of Chatsworth, Christian Duimstra of Rancho Cucamonga, Cristina Farias of Camarillo, Paris Notter of Westlake Village, Brianna Pinal of Vista, Evan Pine of Calabasas and Mikaela Wundrow of San Diego curated the exhibit as part of their Arts Management and Museology course.

The gallery is located in the Soiland Humanities Center at 120 Memorial Parkway. It is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, contact Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival
Weekends June 29 through Aug. 5
Kingsmen Park

The 22nd season of one of the region’s most popular outdoor theatrical events features the Kingsmen Shakespeare Company’s performance of William Shakespeare’s “The Two Noble Kinsmen” and “Othello.”

“Othello”
Friday through Sunday at 8 p.m. | July 20-22 and 27-29, Aug. 3-5
Grounds open at 5:30 p.m. for pre-show picnicking and entertainment.

Racial animus, jealousy and revenge drive Shakespeare’s classic tragedy “Othello.” This masterwork of early modern drama features the playwright’s most famous and arguably best-crafted villain, Iago. In a tale that feels all too contemporary, the villain’s weapons of choice are his victim’s own prejudice and paranoia. Iago wields them with a merciless intelligence, smiling as he effects the ruin of the noble Othello and his naïve young bride, Desdemona, and dragging down the entire state in the process. Join us under the stars for this truly timeless masterpiece.

The Kingsmen Shakespeare Company is the professional theater company of Cal Lutheran. The nonprofit organization runs apprentice programs for professional and aspiring Shakespearean actors, an educational tour program in local schools and summer theater camps for youth.

General admission is $25 for adults, $20 for seniors 65 and over, $15 for students with ID and, as always, free for everyone under 18. Reserved lawn boxes have room for six and are available online for $90 to $110. For tickets and information, visit KingsmenShakespeare.org or call 805-493-3452.

Nsenga Knight: Other Stars
Friday, Aug. 17, through Thursday, Oct. 11
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

“Each of my artistic projects is responding to my self-reflexive question: Who am I and what is my place in this world? My artworks exist as invitations to examine new possibilities that broaden our collective imaginations and challenge traditional boundaries of race, nationhood and religion.” —Nsenga Knight

Knight is a first-generation black American Muslim woman from Brooklyn, and her work is influenced by Islamic geometric art and the black experience. In this exhibit, she works with geometric drawings, text paintings, photographs, oral history recordings and other media. Listen to the enthralling stories of black women in Brooklyn who converted to Islam prior to 1975. Learn about Malcolm X’s pilgrimage to Mecca in 1964, his last religious duty. See how 10th-century astronomical renderings relate to a sociological interpretation of pilgrimage.

Knight received a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania and has exhibited work at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art, the New Museum for Contemporary Art and MoMA PS1. She lives and works in Cairo, Egypt.

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. See Page tkt for parking. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at (805) 493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Mapping Meaning: Adventures in Cartography
Friday, Aug. 17, through Tuesday, Nov. 6
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

Stashed in glove compartments, accessed on our phones and glowing on the metro, maps show us where to go and what to expect when we get there. The geography they interpret for us is, however, subject to the shaping influences of time and power. Coastlines are altered by rising sea levels, lands are “discovered,” boundaries are disputed and conquered, and cultures are created and erased.

Some maps are statements and some are fanciful. Some are mistaken, inserting an island or angling a lake at odds with reality. All maps reveal perspectives and priorities of the people commissioning or making them.

This exhibit presents a variety of beautiful maps and ways of reading them, along with objects from the times of their creation. Works date from the 16th century to the present, including a collection focusing on Scandinavia, a depiction of California as an island, and maps of the heavens. The works were generously loaned from the Dr. Ernst F. Tonsing Collection. Tonsing will give a related lecture at 4 p.m. Oct. 19 in the Room 212 of the William Rolland Art Center, which is next to the building housing the gallery.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@callutheran.edu, or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Fridays Aug. 31, Sept. 28, Oct. 26, Nov. 30, 12:30-1 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Adjunct faculty member Joseph Peeples showcases the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the last Friday of each month. The works performed are of varied character and suited to all. Bring your lunch.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

 


 
"Climbing Cardinals" by Photographer Felice Willat.
"Climbing Cardinals" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"La Boca Tango" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Jemma_El_Fnaa" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Molokai Maidens" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Water Bearer" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Women at Work Sasoon Harbor" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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The Ojai Photography Club will feature fine-art photographer Felice Willat as the presenter for June. The event, “Lifescapes,” is free and open to the public and will be held June 19 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana Road, Ojai CA.

“Lifescapes” is Willat’s name for images that focus on the interconnection between the landscape and its human inhabitants. A world traveler for many years, she has found the traditional genres of landscape photography and portraiture unsatisfying for her vision. Creating a new artistic approach, she uses the lens of her camera to capture the moment when the human and the landscape are revealed to be inseparable. Although her images have been taken during trips abroad, she does not consider herself a travel photographer. Instead, she identifies as an artist who happened to discover art while traveling with a camera in her hand.

The presentation will trace the evolution of Willat’s art over the past decade, beginning with a trip to Burma in 2007 through her most recent journey to India in March of this year. The talk will be illustrated with images from worldwide destinations including Burma, India, Argentina and Hawaii. She will discuss her meditative approach: how her camera provides a sense of stillness and presence. As she expressed it: “I could capture a moment, something sacred or common-place, an unconscious gesture, a tattered clothesline, a red plastic pitcher, or a worn prayer book. I like to leave the familiar, travel to far-away places, and find the gift of really being present.”

Willat began her journey into photography in mid-life after co-founding a successful time management company, Day Runner, and raising three children. Returning from a trip to India one year, she hung a few photographs in her office taken with a small point-and-shoot camera. A colleague commented that she had an eye for photography and this encouragement led her to take design and photography classes and coaching. In subsequent trips her art evolved into a meditation on the oneness of the human and natural world. Her images speak of the stillness that makes this interconnectedness visible.

Based in Santa Barbara, Willat has exhibited widely and won numerous awards for her fine-art photography. The venues for her work have included the Los Angeles Center for Photography, Bergamot Station, the Brand Library, and the Topanga Canyon Gallery, among many others. She has published a book of photographs and poems, “The Quiet Between, Song of Burma.”

For more information on Willat, go to: http://www.felicewillatphotography.com/

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com

 


 

The Ventura County Rose Society will hold its monthly meeting on Thursday, May 24, 2018 at the Ventura County Office of Education Conference Center at 5100 Adolfo Rd., Camarillo. Our program will be a "Double Delight Evening". Our speaker, Hetty Shurtleff, is a American Rose Society Award Floral Arranger who will show us how to do her flower arrangements. Our second "delight" will be a silent auction of garden items and other wonderful things that our members will be bringing in. It will be a fun and informative evening! The doors will open at 6:30 p.m. for advice from Consulting Rosarians and refreshments. There will be a little Rose Show at 7:00 P.M. and our program will begin at 7:30 P.M. Visitors are always welcome to our VCRS meetings.

For more information contact; Janet Sklar at 818-993-6622 or Barbara Morse at 805-499-1657. Our website is: www.venturacountyrosesociety.org

 


 
Photographer Luther Gerlach. Photograph by Scott Miles.
Photographer Luther Gerlach. Photograph by Scott Miles.
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The Ojai Photo Club will feature photographer Scott Miles as its presenter for May. The free event, “The Scientific Photographer,” will be held on Tuesday, May 15, at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

Miles developed a love for exploring the world outside his reach in the museums he visited as a child. Now he is a cultural heritage photographer, specializing in documenting objects in museums, private collections and at archaeological sites. Using advanced techniques, he creates highly accurate images for digital archives. His work preserves a permanent record of humanity’s achievements that can be shared with a global audience. He is passionate about sharing these treasures and will illustrate his discussion with images he has produced for museums.

Miles will discuss techniques for achieving professional quality image capture. A member of the faculty at Brooks Institute beginning in 2002, he developed a curriculum in scientific and technical imaging. He has had a longtime fascination with the power of photography, as he expressed it, “to make the invisible visible.” He continued, “Scientific phenomena and subjects that are too small, too fast, too slow, outside the visible spectrum of light, can all be revealed with the right im-aging techniques.”

Wrapping up the discussion, Miles will preview his current installation art projects. He is creating two high-speed video installation pieces that will be placed at The Blackboard Gallery in Camarillo in November. These pieces use slow-motion (high frame rate capture) video and other installation components to explore our relationship with time and space. For more on Miles see his website at: http://thescientificphotographer.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com

 


 
All photos courtesy Sarah Bourscheid
All photos courtesy Sarah Bourscheid
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The Ojai Photo Club will feature photographer and documentary cinematographer Sarah Bourscheid as its guest presenter for April. The free event, “Quiet Compassion,” will be held on Tuesday, April 17, at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

Bourscheid practices compassion through the lens of her camera, striving to bring the viewer and the subject together to discover their shared humanity despite any differences. In her eyes, empathy and beauty are inseparable. The presentation will explore compassion in everyday life and include projects on loss, strength and love. She will show a selection of her still images as well as a preview of a video documentary currently in production.

For Bourscheid, her photography is a journey of growth, deepening her own empathy. “In this tumultuous and divided world,” she writes, “it’s important to understand that our differences can bring us closer.”

Growing up in New Jersey, Bourscheid developed an early passion for storytelling and at first thought she wanted to be a novelist. But after two years in New York for a degree in creative writing, she realized that she didn’t want to think up stories in her head when there was so much that captured her attention in the world around her. Changing tracks for a more visual medium, she went on to graduate from Brooks Institute of Photography with a Bachelor of Science in visual journalism. Although she has changed career paths, she feels that her background in writing has made her a stronger visual storyteller. Currently she is a professional photographer, videographer and documentary cinematographer based in Ventura. She specializes in event coverage, corporate video, documentaries and video editing. As a staff photographer for the Ojai Valley Visitor’s Guide, she has created the series “Faces of Ojai.”

For more information about Bourscheid’s work, go to her website, http://scheidmedia.com/

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 
Photo credit: Brian Stethem.
Photo credit: Brian Stethem.
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Performers, crafts, food to fill Cal Lutheran campus

The largest Nordic festival in Southern California will return to California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks on April 21 and 22.

The 43rd Scandinavian Festival will celebrate the cultures of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Sami people from the Arctic regions of Scandinavia. The family-friendly festival will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with music, dancing, food, crafts, activities, demonstrations, vendors and lectures.

The festival includes a Children’s Theater, a puppet show of Hans Christian Andersen stories and performances by community children’s groups including the Redwood Middle School Jazz Band. Children can travel through Scandinavia at the festival, earning passport stamps as they complete crafts reflecting the five different countries. Visitors young and old can create head wreaths decorated with flowers and ribbon and dance around the maypole.

Festivalgoers can also wander through an authentic Viking village, as well as a Sami sliddastallan, or community gathering. They can ask a rune reader for advice, visit Norwegian elkhounds and take Scandinavian dance lessons. Families can also try their hand at Dala horse croquet and play an ancient Viking game called kubb.

Cooks will demonstrate how to make aebleskivers, lefse and krumkake. Other food options include Swedish pancakes, Viking dogs, Swedish meatball pizza, open-faced sandwiches and Swedish baked goods.

The festival kicks off with an opening ceremony and a parade of Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish and Sami participants in traditional costumes carrying flags of their countries. Performers will include Icelandic folk rock band The Evening Guests, the ABBAFAB tribute band, acclaimed storytellers Stina Fagertun of Norway and RJ Ryan Seutter, musician and entertainer Ross Sutter, and folk dance groups.

Vendors of Scandinavian handicrafts will be selling their wares, and Scandinavian vintage cars and motorcycles will be on display. A booth will feature genealogy experts who can help visitors trace their family trees and a representative of Family Tree DNA, which sells a variety of DNA kits.

The Scandinavian American Cultural and Historical Foundation is producing the event.

Admission is free for children 12 and younger, $5 for teenagers and $10 for adults. Parking is free. The campus is located at 60 W. Olsen Road. For more information or to volunteer, go to scandinavianfest.org, email scanfest2018@gmail.com or visit us on Facebook.

 
All photographs courtesy Holly and Mark Jansen. Event and biography information below.
All photographs courtesy Holly and Mark Jansen. Event and biography information below.
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The Ojai Photo Club will feature Holly and Mark Jansen, Ventura-based photographers and workshop leaders, who will present “A Photographer’s View of Iceland and the Changing Climate.” The event will be held March 20, 2018, in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Clara St., Ojai, CA.

Over the past five years the Jansens have traveled to Iceland conducting photographic tours of its magnificent and pristine landscapes. Based on their perspective as keenly observant photographers and frequent travelers, they have witnessed evidence of changes in the area due to ice melt, receding glaciers and the impact of man on the environment. Unlike scientific approaches, the Jansen presentation will show climate change emerging over time through multiple photographic images that tell their own story.

Iceland drew worldwide attention and became a favorite destination for tourists following its massive volcanic eruptions in 2010. The internet was flooded with stunning pictures of the country known as “The Land of Fire and Ice.” The Jansen presentation will offer an opportunity to view the wild and dramatic landscape of Iceland off the tourist track, and will include images from their most recent expedition in February 2018.

Mark Jansen is a successful fine art photographer who has participated in over forty shows and gallery exhibitions in Southern California. His large-scale murals of vintage World War II aviation images are permanently displayed at the Camarillo and Santa Maria airports. He grew up in Los Angeles and studied Commercial Design and Photography at Moorpark College.

Holly Higbee-Jansen is a native of the San Francisco Bay area. Her family loved photography and she spent many summers with them in Yosemite National Park attending Ansel Adams’ landscape photography workshops. She holds degrees in Business and Design from Skidmore College and the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Mark and Holly Jansen cofounded Jansen Photo Expeditions, and they have provided single and multi-day instructional photography workshops throughout the American West, Iceland, and Costa Rica since 1996.
For further information, go to https://jansenphotoexpeditions.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for review. More information is available at www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 
All photographs by Guy Webster.
All photographs by Guy Webster.
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Ojai, CA: “Second Look” with Guy Webster

The Ojai Photo Club will kick off a new year of free monthly events with the return of Guy Webster, internationally recognized celebrity photographer. His presentation, “Second Look,” will begin at 7 pm on Tuesday, February 20, in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Clara Street, Ojai, CA.

Webster’s images first appeared on the album covers of ‘60s and ‘70s rock groups, becoming cultural icons for millions of people across the globe. His groundbreaking portraits took celebrities out of the photographic studio and created a natural and intimate aesthetic for a new era. His prolific work has encompassed an extraordinary range of prominent figures, from rock stars such as Jim Morrison and Bob Dylan, to Hollywood legends including Liza Minnelli and Barbra Streisand, to famous authors like Truman Capote and Allen Ginsberg.

“Second Look” is inspired by the idea that when the photographer takes a second look at his images there are more treasures to be discovered. Webster will present shots from his archives that have never been published before, accompanied by his gift for entertaining audiences with the backstories. This will be a preview of his new photographic anthology by the same title.

Growing up in Hollywood in a show business family, Webster was uniquely positioned to become a sought-after photographer to celebrities, since many had been neighbors, classmates or friends. The music revolution of the ‘60s coincided with the beginning of his career, and he followed his passion for the emerging musical scene. Spanning forty years, his innovative photographic work has covered the worlds of music, films and politics. For more about Webster and his portraits, go to https://guywebster.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com

 

Sunday, February 25, 2018, from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Santa Paula Art Museum
Admission is free for everyone

SANTA PAULA, CA – On Sunday, February 25, bring your family and friends to “Free Family Day: An Imaginary World” at the Santa Paula Art Museum! Visitors are invited to explore the Museum's current exhibitions, participate in hands-on art workshops, and challenge one another to a digital game of "I Spy." Admission to the event is free for everyone and activities will run from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Free Family Day: An Imaginary World will allow guests to interact with the art featured in the Museum’s current “Setting the Scene” exhibit, all of which was created by artists who worked in animation and film during the Golden Age of Hollywood. Participants will be shown how to create a flip book animation drawing that will then be made into a short animated video using stop-motion technology. Freelance illustrator and photographer Lala T. Konrath will lead the drawing segment of the workshop and video game artist and 3D animation specialist Anita McLaughlin will lead the digital component.

The Santa Paula Art Museum, Jeanette Cole Art Center is located at 117 North 10th Street in historic downtown Santa Paula. The Museum features rotating exhibitions of vintage and contemporary art, educational programming for children and adults, artist talks and demonstrations, a gift shop, and more. The Museum’s regular hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Regular admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for seniors, and is free for museum members and students. For more information, please contact the Museum at (805) 525-5554.

 

An artistic exploration of Mother Nature untouched was nearly consumed by Mother Nature unleashed when the Thomas fire threatened the works of Ojai artist Lorraine Serena.

Serena, whose work will appear in an upcoming exhibition at CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI), was evacuated from her Ojai home four times as she and CSUCI Art Lecturer Anette Kubitza put together the show. The studio where Serena works as well as her art pieces were at her home.

“Each time Lorraine was evacuated, we didn’t know if the work would survive,” Kubitza said.

Titled “Sanctuaries,” the exhibition will run from Feb. 19 to April 7 with a Feb. 22 opening in the John Spoor Broome Gallery. The reception will last from 5 to 7 p.m. with a talk from Serena about her work. Visit the John Spoor Broome Library for library hours.

“For me, ‘Sanctuaries’ is about places of peace and solitude and comfort,” Serena said. “Landscapes, churches, temples. I was doing it as a contemplative thing.”

Serena’s charcoal drawings are large, about 49 by 60 inches. The shrines are examples of Serena’s collage work.

To Kubitza, “Sanctuaries” is a study of the multilayered relationship between human beings and their environment, which can be a source of peace and power.

“Nature can evoke feelings of soul-nurturing retreat from social woes, yet recently, those gave way to feelings of awe and powerlessness as riverbeds flooded and fires roared,” Kubitza said.

Serena received her bachelor’s and Master of Fine Arts at UC Santa Barbara and lived in Montecito for a time before moving to Ojai, so watching the fire sweep through the two counties she called home was heartbreaking for her.

“I just got chills through my whole body at the mention of it,” Serena said. “It’s just horrifying.”

Serena hopes “Sanctuaries” reminds guests of the softer side of nature.

Serena began her career with a series of artistic collaborations at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. These installations involved more than 600 student artists.

Later, Serena would go on to establish Women Beyond Borders (womenbeyondborders.org), which became her life’s work.

The multi-year project involved sending more than 1,000 artists in 50 countries one small wooden box each, which they made into a piece of art, then returned to Serena. Among the artistic boxes are works from more than 10,000 children, 6,500 with disabilities.

“We’re all isolated artists in our studios,” she said. “I’m very fond of collaboration. I don’t like to just walk alone as an artist. I like to walk with other artists.”

Serena considers “Sanctuaries” and “Women Beyond Borders” both as examples of her overarching art form: building community.

She is fond of quoting Japanese writer Ryunosuke Satoro, who said: “Individually, we are one drop. Together, we are an ocean.”

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CSUCI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CSUCI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more by visiting CSUCI’s Social Media.

 

CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) Professor and Chair of the Environmental Science & Resource Management Program Sean Anderson, Ph.D., will speak about the short- and long-term effects of the Thomas Fire as part of the Ventura Land Trust’s (VLT) 2018 Environmental Speaker Series.

The community lecture begins at 7 p.m. on Jan. 18 at the Poinsettia Pavilion, 3451 Foothill Rd. in Ventura.

The lecture is entitled “No Doubting Thomas: The Impacts, Management and World after 2017’s Ventura County Fires.”

“I’ll be talking about the ecological impacts of the Thomas Fire we have seen to date and what we are likely to see in the coming months,” Anderson said. “In particular I’ll discuss the fire’s impact to our local wildlife: which animals perished, which animals survived, and how our ecosystem will be changed for the foreseeable future.”

Anderson will discuss how wilderness areas react to wildfires, especially during this unprecedented climate change, as well as how the fire affected local ecosystems and wildlife. He will also talk about measures we can take to prevent erosion and flood damage in the future as well as encourage the return of native plants and animals.
Anderson and his team of graduate and undergraduate researchers have been measuring the effect of the Thomas Fire on wildlife and the wilderness using methods such as drone-mapping and an ongoing public survey asking residents to report any dead wild animals along the road or in the aftermath of the fire. (The survey is at: http://bit.ly/firekill)

Anderson hopes the survey will help determine where to set up habitats to encourage the return of some species of plant or animal all but wiped out by the fire.

Now in its third year, this is the first in this year’s environmental series, which the VLT hosts annually in order to educate the public about important environmental topics.

A suggested donation of $10 per person will be collected at the door and will go toward restoration work at the VLT’s Big Rock Preserve. Space is limited and reservations are highly encouraged. RSVP at: www.venturalandtrust.org/events.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CSUCI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CSUCI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more by visiting CSUCI’s Social Media.

 

Press release By John Hankins

Wilderness Basics Course – class starts Feb. 7

The local Sierra Club’s annual Wilderness Basics Course promises adventure, friendships, confidence, beauty, weather, inspiration, knowledge, tasty food and hardy health.

It’s all about the Club’s ethic of showing people the forests, open spaces, mountains and rivers in a safe and comfortable manner, and you don’t have to be a member.

Now in its 9th year, the program runs from Feb. 7 to March 28 with conditioning hikes, car camp and backpacks in prime locations in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties.

The course is geared to a wide variety of experiences, ranging from novice to knowledgeable, out-of-shape to out-of- sight. It’s for everybody, from teens to seniors, singles, couples and family members.

Last year’s classes had a Camarillo woman sign up with her daughter, a Santa Barbara student, a hiker who “wants to take it to another level,” an empty-nest couple, retirees, man who wanted to follow his backpacking son, another who “wants to get to know the area,” and many who cited simply getting outside in the fresh air.

Classes are Wednesday nights at the Poinsettia Pavilion, 3451 Foothill Rd, Ventura. Outings are during weekends.

Co-founder of the Los Padres Chapter’s WBC, Teresa Norris, took the club’s course in San Diego, and became so enthusiastic she went on to become a leader, and when she moved to Ventura County in 2004, she volunteered to help create the popular class here.

“Taking WBC helped me update my gear and lighten my load. When I did that, my trips became more enjoyable and I could hike faster too,” she said, and perhaps most important, “I made some of the best friends of my life.”

But before she took a WBC course, “I carried an extra pair of blue jeans and 6 liters of water on one trip where I wasn't sure about finding water. I could hardly lift my pack, just like Cheryl Strayed in ‘Wild’.”

WBC graduate Kristi KirkPatrick said, “It was inspirational, challenging, and so much fun to hang out with this wonderful group of people.”

Course content Chair Alisse Fisher emphasized that all WBC hike leaders are trained in first aid and have knowledge of the flora and fauna; the speakers are experts in gear, safety, food, fitness and the new outdoor book has the latest information. Also, course handouts are online for those who may have missed a class or want to refresh.

Last word is from club leader Nina Danza, who posted of “a great work-out today on the trail. Just what I needed. Need to repeat much more frequently. Can I retire yet?”

Early bird prices are available until Jan. 24 and the funds are used to cover expenses. Last year some extra funds were donated to the nine Search and Rescue teams in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties.

All the detail you need or to sign up is at: http://www.lospadreswbc.org

 

The Finnish people drink more coffee per capita than any other people in the world. Finland holds world championships for mosquito catching. Finland has a 100 percent literacy rate. And on Finland’s “National Sleepyhead Day,” the last person in the household to wake up is thrown in the water.

These are just a few fun facts about Finland, a small but mighty country that celebrated 100 years of independence on Dec. 6, 2017.

In honor of this milestone, CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is hosting an exhibition in the Broome Gallery called “History and Mystery: Finland at 100.”

Facilitated by Professor of Art and Broome Library Coordinator Irina D. Costache and curated by Professor of Art Liz King, the exhibit contains a wide variety of Finnish literature and artifacts owned by Finnish native Tiina Itkonen, Associate Professor of Education & Political Science. Itkonen wanted to share her culture with her adopted country, so she came up with the idea of the centenary exhibition.

“For me, it was a cultural and emotional thing to have my country turning 100,” Itkonen said. “It’s a huge sense of pride especially for outer Fins, who are Fins who have been abroad for a long time. We’ve had events like this around the world.”

An opening reception will be held on Jan.25 at 5 p.m. in the Broome Gallery, which is on the second floor of the John Spoor Broome Library. The exhibition will run through Feb. 12.

CSUCI Provost Geoff Chase, who was a Fulbright Scholar in Turku, Finland, will give a welcome address followed by words from the Finnish Consul General Stefan Lindström.

Finnish music played at the reception will be to underscore the world-renowned Sebelius Academy in Helsinki, which trains some of the finest conductors and musicians in the world. It is named for Finnish composer and violinist Jean Sibelius, often credited with giving Finland a sense of national identity during its struggle for independence from Russia with his composition “Finlandia.”

Also on display will be Finnish pottery, musical instruments, metal ware, photos of architecture and Marimekko fabric, known for its environmentally safe production process, and innovative designs.

“As a designer and an artist, I find Finnish design inspiring and amazing in its simplicity,” King said. “The Marimekko fabric has clean, simple and colorful designs. A lot of great architects and designers come from Finland.”

King thinks putting a spotlight on a country that straddles Russia and European Union gives CSUCI students and the public a chance to see how the impact this small country has had on American culture.

“A lot of everyday items are made by Finnish people,” King said. “They developed Nokia cell phones, Angry Birds, and Fiskar scissors, which you may have in your kitchen.”

Itknonen said she is perhaps most proud of Finland’s educational system, in which teaching is a well-paid and sought-after profession and yields a country with a literacy rate of 100%, a testament to the power of investing in people.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CSUCI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CSUCI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more by visiting CSUCI’s Social Media.

 

Biomythography: Currency Exchange
Through Thursday, Feb. 1
Curator’s Walk-through: Saturday, Jan. 20, 1 p.m.
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

This exhibition investigates multiple forms of currency and the ways in which they are encoded in today’s culture. Contemporary artists from Costa Rica, Southern California and elsewhere use multimedia to draw attention to and understand the idea of cultural currency.
Featured artists include Guillermo Bert, Audrey Chan, Christian Salablanca Diaz, Chuck Feesago, Mimian Hsu, Elisa Bergel Melo, Kim Morris, Albert Lopez Jr., Marton Robinson, Javier Estaban Calvo Sandi and Glen Wilson. The exhibit is curated by Chris Christion and Jessica Wimbley.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

Convergencia / Convergence
Through Thursday, Feb. 1
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

Curated by prolific representational artist Hernán Miranda, this exhibition features work by contemporary Paraguayans. Although several of the artists live abroad in Germany, Argentina, France and the United States, all the works are influenced by their mother country. Media include oil, acrylic, charcoal and graphite, and sculptures in bronze and glass, for “a convergence of different languages” in art coming from Paraguay, Miranda explains.

Artists include Gustavo Beckelmann, Osvaldo Camperchioli, Maite Casablanca, Esperanza Gill, Jorge Codas, Michael Oliver, Sila Estigarribia, Hernán Miranda, Roberto Morelli, Corina Paredes, Liliana Segovia, Felix Toranzos, Jorge Von Horoch and Gabriel Brizuela.

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at (805) 493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

History Lecture Series: Collapse
“The Han Dynasty Collapses”
Jan. 10, 7-8:30 p.m.
Grant Brimhall Library Community Room

Given that no civilization lasts forever, how can we identify moments in history when a society, as it had been known for generations, ended?

Over six lectures, Cal Lutheran history professors will explore the collapse of Ancient Egypt, the Persian Empire, the Han Dynasty and the Roman Empire, as well as the Black Death and the end of the European order. At this talk, David Nelson will discuss the civilizational collapse of 226 CE.

Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Library are sponsoring the free event. The Grant R. Brimhall Library is located at 1401 E. Janss Road in Thousand Oaks. For information, contact Cindy Keitel at ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Fridays, Jan. 19, Feb. 9, March 9 and April 13,
at 12:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel
University organist Joseph Peeples showcases the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in four 30-minute recitals featuring varied works for all audiences. Attendees are welcome to bring a lunch.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Biomythography: Un-Panel Workshop
Thursday, Jan. 25, 4-6 p.m.
Overton Hall
Organized and facilitated by Dorit Cypis and Holly Tempo, this workshop will train participants in creating open dialogues and resolving conflict while addressing themes from the art exhibition “Biomythography: Currency Exchange.”

Cypis is an Israeli-born visual artist and innovative professional mediator. Her work explores themes of history, identity and social relations and has been presented in diverse cultural contexts in the United States and internationally. She is a founding member of Mediators Beyond Borders International and the co-founder and educator of the North East Youth Council. She earned a Master of Fine Arts from California Institute for the Arts and a Master of Dispute Resolution from Pepperdine University. In 2014, she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Rauschenberg Foundation Residency.

Tempo is an associate professor of painting at Otis College of Art and Design who is known for her labor-intensive paintings and site-specific pieces. Her work utilizes urban tropes such as trash, graffiti and cardboard used by the homeless to create shelter. It has been shown extensively in Southern California as well as in India, Spain, Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, Israel and Central America. Tempo holds an MFA from the Claremont Graduate University.

Admission is free, but space is limited. RSVP by Jan. 10 to rollandgallery@callutheran.edu. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or
rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

International Film Festival
“Mona Lisa is Missing”
Featuring Q&A with producers Joe and Justine Mestichelli Medeiros
Wednesday, Jan. 31, 7 p.m.
AMC Dine-In Thousand Oaks 14
The “Mona Lisa” was stolen? Surprisingly, yes – on Aug. 21, 1911. Vincenzo Peruggia, an Italian immigrant, took the painting and hid it in his dingy tenement room in Paris for more than two years. How did he do it? Why did he do it? The award-winning 2012 documentary “Mona Lisa Is Missing: The True Story of the Man Who Stole the Masterpiece” answers these questions and more.

The documentary is written and directed by Joe Medeiros, who is considered the leading authority on the theft of the masterpiece, and co-produced with Justine Mestichelli Medeiros. The husband and wife, who live in the Conejo Valley, will be present for a Q&A following the screening.

Cal Lutheran’s Department of Languages and Cultures is sponsoring the free event. This selection in Cal Lutheran’s fifth annual International Film Festival is shown primarily in English with some subtitles. The theater is located at 166 W. Hillcrest Drive in Thousand Oaks.

For information, contact Brittany Corbucci at 805-796-4555 or bcorbucci@callutheran.edu.

 

William Shakespeare, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Ursula Wood are among the British poets who will be celebrated during the CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) Choir winter concert entitled: “The Poet Sings: Songs and Poetry of the British Isles.”

Concerts are Dec. 4 at 7 p.m. in Malibu Hall on the CSUCI campus and again Dec. 10 at 3 p.m. at St. Columba’s Episcopal Church at 1251 Las Posas Rd. in Camarillo. Performances are free, but donations are appreciated.

The performance will interweave poetry readings and musical selections from the Medieval era to the 20th Century.

“Words alone are expressive, but combined with music goes to a much deeper level,” said CSUCI Choir director KuanFen Liu, who holds a doctorate in Musical Arts (DMA).

Musical selections will include carols, madrigals and folksongs such as the "There is No Rose", "In the Bleak Midwinter", “The Blue Bird” and a special composition of “Three Shakespeare Songs” by R. Vaughan Williams, an English composer born in 1872.

“Some poems and songs are more cheerful, some are witty, some are darker,” Liu said.

Included in the performance is “Three Madrigals” by composer/performance artist Emma Lou Diemer, Professor Emeritus at UC Santa Barbara, and original poems from CSUCI students.

By bringing music and poetry together, Liu hopes the program helps the audience gain a deeper appreciation and understanding beyond what each art form offers on its own.

The CSUCI Choir, about 55 strong, is comprised of students, alumni and members of the community and auditions are held prior to the beginning of each semester.

The choir meets weekly as a class as part of the University’s Performing Arts program. It offers participants exposure to a wide range of musical genres and periods, as well as the opportunity to perform publicly on campus and throughout Ventura County. For more information, contact Molly Pei, 805-218-2042 or visit the CICA website at www.cicachoir.org.

Donations made at each performance help support the choir and its sponsor, Channel Islands Choral Association (CICA), a 501(c) (3) organization that serves Ventura County and brings choral music education and performance to the local schools and community.

Limited parking is available on campus with the purchase of a $6 daily permit; follow signs to the parking permit dispensers. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the CSUCI Vista Bus to the campus; the cash-only fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CSUCI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CSUCI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more by visiting CSUCI’s Social Media.

 

"Tom Jenkins" by Donna Granata.
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"Nick Ut" by Donna Granata.
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"Norman Kirk" by Donna Granata.
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"Deborah McKillop" by Donna Granata.
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"Matt Furmanski" by Donna Granata.
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"Beatrice Wood" by Donna Granata.
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Donna Granata portrait by photographer Johnny Vong.
Donna Granata portrait by photographer Johnny Vong.
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The Ojai Photo Club will host a presentation by Donna Granata, Founder and Executive Director of the Ventura based Focus on the Masters (FOTM), a highly respected non-profit educational program documenting contemporary artists. The event will be held on Tuesday, November 14th, at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana Rd., Ojai CA.

Focus on the Masters is recognized as one of the leading arts organizations in California. Founded in 1994, the goal of Focus on the Masters is to demonstrate the importance of the arts to society. Granata will present an in-depth look at her creative process in achieving this goal; including highlights and a behind the scenes look into the documentation process for the FOTM Portrait Series. Featuring portrait studies and biographies of master artists, the series is ongoing, with new artists added each year. She says, “The FOTM archive is a treasure-trove of unique recordings of oral histories and video-taped interviews, each one tracing the professional and personal arcs of an artist’s life.” Selected works from the FOTM portrait series are housed in the Smithsonian Institution’s Archive of American Artists and in the photographic Collection of the George Eastman House, Rochester, New York, as well as other public institutions.

In her presentation Granata will share the latest developments for FOTM. Recently she completed a Master’s Degree in Arts Journalism from USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism and is putting the new practices to good use. She is enthusiastic about the possibilities of the new technology, and comments, “Harnessing today’s technology to time-tested research means that Focus on the Masters can communicate the importance of the creative spirit to audiences well beyond our geographical boundaries.”

An accomplished artist in her own right, Granata is an internationally published and award-winning painter turned photographer. She received a Bachelor of Arts Degree and Honorary Master of Science Degree from the Brooks Institute of Photography where she was an adjunct professor. Focus on the Masters has been the recipient of numerous awards in recognition of its outstanding contributions to arts education, including the 2005 inaugural Ventura Mayor’s Art Award – Arts Educator and the 2007 Ventura County Arts Council Art Star Award. Granata received a Lifetime Achievement Award in the Arts in 2012 from the City of Ojai. For more information on this outstanding photographer and her award-winning arts organization, go to http://www.focusonthemasters.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 
60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks

Art in a Time of Reformation: Works from the Rodolfo Sanzana Collection
Through Thursday, Nov. 9
Closing Reception: Saturday, Nov. 4, 6-8 p.m.
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

To coincide with the 500-year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, this exhibit includes art based on the Reformation from the collection of Chilean-born collector Rodolfo Sanzana. The paintings, sculptures and other works tell a story of life and art during the period before, during and after Martin Luther nailed his famed 95 theses to the door of Wittenberg Castle Church in 1517. Included are works produced by the workshops or followers of Lucas Cranach, Rogier van der Weyden, Hendrick van Cleve II, Abraham Bioemaert and Sebastian Vrancx.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, visit RollandGallery.CalLutheran.edu, email rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or call 805-493-3697.

The Tract Project
Through Thursday, Nov. 9
Closing Reception: Saturday, Nov. 4, 6-8 p.m.
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

The invention of the printing press and moveable type completely revolutionized the dissemination of information in the 16th century and allowed Martin Luther’s ideas to be widely communicated through printed propaganda. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, the gallery is presenting this exhibit by Lisa Anne Auerbach that celebrates the life and power of paper pamphlets, leaflets and tracts.

The Tract House was founded in 2008 as a spread-the-word project inspired by the distribution model and graphic quality of religious tracts and first displayed at the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore. While most popular tracts are religious, The Tract House tracts can also be manifestos, diatribes, stories, rants, poems or lyrics. Visitors can take any tracts they find of interest.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, visit RollandGallery.CalLutheran.edu, email rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or call 805-493-3697.

Vulnerability inVisibility
Through Thursday, Nov. 9
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

In this show, photographer Mary Fashbaugh explores the senses in human interactions, their limitations and our expectations of them. Her portraits of people are out of focus and abstract, except for details revealed beneath glass domes spelling out the sitter’s name in Braille.

“I am attracted to Braille for its visual and physical presence,” explains Fashbaugh. “It is a language that few learn to read unless necessary. It is frequently passed up on elevators and in public restrooms, blending in to its surface, visible only to those who seek it. It is the only language which requires direct contact with the external world. The usage of this language in my art works as a reference to material connection and the significance of bodily presence.”

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

History Lecture Series: Collapse
Wednesdays, Nov. 1, Dec. 6 and Jan. 10, 7-8:30 p.m.
Grant Brimhall Library Community Room

Given that no civilization lasts forever, how can we identify moments in history when a society, as it had been known for generations, ended?

Over six lectures – three in fall and three in spring – Cal Lutheran history professors will explore the collapse of Ancient Egypt, the Persian Empire, the Han Dynasty and the Roman Empire, as well as the Black Death and the end of the European order.

During “Sea People Invade Egypt” on Nov. 1, Michaela Reaves will kick off the series with a discussion of the invasions of Egypt beginning in 2000 BCE that led to its collapse in 1177 BCE.

On Dec. 6, in “Collapse of the Persian Empire,” Paul Hanson will discuss the lead-up to the events of 323 BCE.

On Jan. 10, David Nelson will conclude the fall series with a talk on the civilizational collapse of 226 CE in “The Han Dynasty Collapses.”

Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Library are sponsoring the free events. The Grant R. Brimhall Library is located at 1401 E. Janss Road in Thousand Oaks. For more information, contact Cindy Keitel at ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

Lutherans in the Holy Land
Wednesday, Nov. 1, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

How do Palestinian Christians live out their faith living in the Holy Land? The Rev. Mitri Raheb, president of the Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land, will introduce us to the Lutheran church in the Holy Land, teach about challenges facing Palestinian Christians, and provide a glimpse into the work of contributing to peace and reconciliation in the region.

Born in Bethlehem, Raheb holds a doctorate in theology from the Philipps University at Marburg, Germany. He is the author of many articles and 16 books, which so far have been translated into 11 languages. A social entrepreneur, Raheb has founded a number of NGOs.

The event is free. For more information contact Marisa Post at mpost@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3589.

Faculty Recital
Yoshika Masuda
Friday, Nov. 3, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Newly appointed assistant professor of music and director of string studies Yoshika Masuda will present a program consisting of music spanning three centuries. Masuda has performed as a soloist and chamber musician throughout Japan, China, Australia, Mexico, Western Europe and the United States. He has won national competitions in Japan, Australia and the U.S.

Donations will be accepted. For more information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

“The Suppressed Luther: The Meaning of his Biblical Critique of Capitalism for Today’s Crises”
Ulrich Duchrow
Saturday, Nov. 4, 7 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Martin Luther's critique of early capitalism is absent in the many occasions of commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation — in Germany and in the United States. This is strange because it is crucial for Luther's understanding of God, the human being, and of society in his context — but also of the Gospel.

Today's context cries out for careful consideration of this issue. As we try to understand the interrelationship of the three contexts — antiquity, early modernity and today—we see that each of these contexts represents a specific phase of the development of money, influencing not only the economy but the whole of civilization, including patterns of thinking and feeling. Luther's clarity on this point can help Christian churches reconsider theology for contemporary predicaments brought about by capital-driven civilization.

Ulrich Duchrow is a professor of systematic theology at the University of Heidelberg, the oldest university in Germany. He has written numerous books and articles on ecumenical theology, focusing on Christianity in the context of globalization. As an internationally respected theologian, he brings into discussion how Martin Luther and Lutheran theology can serve as a resource for radical critique of global economics and culture, particularly in the role faith communities play in social justice.

Admission is free. For more information, contact Sam Thomas at sthomas@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3693.

“Cymbeline”
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Michael J. Arndt
Thursday to Saturday, Nov. 9-11 and 16-18, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 19, 2 p.m.
Blackbox Studio Theatre

Shakespeare’s fairy-tale play, Cymbeline, written toward the end of his career, presents a world turned upside down by questions of love and betrayal. The classification-defying play is filled with kings, queens, lower-class clowns, physical humor, cross-dressing women and men, poisons, sword fights, dastardly villains and deaths. Featuring an original score by composer Christopher Hoag, the production has something for everyone to enjoy.
Admission is $10. For information and reservations, call 805-493-3452.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Nov. 10 and Dec 8, 12:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Adjunct faculty member Joseph Peeples showcases the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the second Friday of each month. He will play varied works for all audiences. Attendees are encouraged to bring lunch.

Admission is free. For more information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Areté Vocal Ensemble
A Centennial Tribute to Leonard Bernstein (part 1)
With special guests: The Los Robles Children’s Choir
Sunday, Nov. 12, 2 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Areté returns to the stage for its ninth season, which could be the most interesting and eclectic yet. The program is the first of a two-part tribute to the great American composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein at the 100th anniversary of his birth.

With uncompromising attention to musical detail and a passion for live performance, Areté provides a joyful, moving, educational and soul-nurturing experience. Wyant Morton conducts.

Tickets are $20 at the door or $15 if purchased online in advance. Students with ID are $10. For information or to purchase tickets, visit aretevocalensemble.org.

World War I and America
World War I and America is a two-year national Library of America initiative bringing together the voices of veterans, families and others to explore the relevance of the war a century later. Cal Lutheran’s participation includes classroom oral histories from the families of World War I veterans, public readings and discussions, and a public lecture by World War I expert Michael Birdwell.

Oral Histories Reception
Nov. 14, 7 p.m.
World War I and Sgt. York
Michael Birdwell
Nov. 14, 8 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

A history professor at Tennessee Tech University, Birdwell has studied the life of Sgt. Alvin C. York for more than a quarter century, working directly with descendants of the very highly decorated soldier. He is curator of the York papers in Pall Mall, Tennessee.
The events are presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and other organizations, with generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Cal Lutheran’s History Department, Pearson Library and Office of Veteran Resources are sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Michaela Reaves at reaves@callutheran.edu.

Entrepreneur Speaker Series
Ginger Zumaeta, CEO of Zumaeta Group
Westlake Center
Wednesday, Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m.

Ginger Zumaeta, CEO of Zumaeta Group, will share her entrepreneurial journey.

The evening begins with networking at 6 p.m. and the main speaker starts at 6:45 p.m.

The Entrepreneur Speaker Series is a monthly event that provides an opportunity for networking and learning from experienced entrepreneurs. Admission is free, but registration is required as seating is limited. For more information, contact Susan Wood at som@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3091.

International Education Week
Celebrating Cal Lutheran’s Internationalization
International Education Week, Nov. 13-17, is a joint initiative of the U.S. departments of State and Education celebrating the benefits of international education and student exchanges.

• World Fair
Wednesday, Nov. 15, 6-8 p.m.
Student Union
Cultures from around the world that are represented at Cal Lutheran are celebrated with food, entertainment and more.

• International Chapel Service
Thursday, Nov. 16, 11:25 a.m.
Samuelson Chapel
International students and those students who have studied abroad commemorate their experiences during this worship service.

Cal Lutheran’s International Student Services and Multicultural Programs Office is sponsoring the free events. For more information, contact Linda Boberg at 805-493-3323 or lboberg@callutheran.edu.

Biomythography: Currency Exchange
Thursday, Nov. 16, through Thursday, Feb. 1
Artists’ reception: Dec. 2
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

This exhibition investigates multiple forms of currency and the ways in which they are encoded in today’s culture. Contemporary artists from Costa Rica, Southern California and elsewhere use multimedia to draw attention to and understand the idea of cultural currency.
Featured artists include Guillermo Bert, Audrey Chan, Christian Salablanca Diaz, Chuck Feesago, Mimian Hsu, Elisa Bergel Melo, Kim Morris, Albert Lopez Jr., Marton Robinson, Javier Estaban Calvo Sandi and Glen Wilson. Chris Christion and Jessica Wimbley curated the exhibit.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@CalLutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

Convergencia / Convergencia
Thursday, Nov. 16, through Thursday, Feb. 1
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

Curated by prolific representational artist Hernán Miranda, this exhibition features work by contemporary Paraguayans. Although several of the artists live abroad in Germany, Argentina, France and the United States, all the works are influenced by their mother country. Media include oil, acrylic, charcoal and graphite, and sculptures in bronze and glass, for “a convergence of different languages” in art coming from Paraguay, Miranda explains.

Artists include Gustavo Beckelmann, Osvaldo Camperchioli, Maite Casablanca, Esperanza Gill, Jorge Codas, Michael Oliver, Sila Estigarribia, Hernán Miranda, Roberto Morelli, Corina Paredes, Liliana Segovia, Felix Toranzos, Ing. Jorge Von Horoch and Gabriel Brizuela.
Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Faculty Recital
Micah Wright, clarinet
Saturday, Nov. 18, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Clarinetist and adjunct faculty Micah Wright will be joined by pianist Jason Lo and organist Thomas Mellan for an evening of clarinet concertos and showpieces. The concert will feature works by Debussy, Lovreglio, Bernstein, Copland and Weber.

Wright performs in solo, chamber, studio and orchestral settings in the Los Angeles area. He also maintains a private studio and teaches clinics and masterclasses throughout the Southwest as a clinician for D’Addario Woodwinds.

Currently, he is performing with two award-winning ensembles in Los Angeles. The Aristeia Trio is a newly-formed group with cellist Annie-Jacobs-Perkins and pianist Vijay Venkatesh. Together, they had their radio and concert tour debut in 2016 as winners of the Frances Walton Competition. The Kaleidoscope Trio is an eclectic ensemble with violinist Mann-Wen Lo and guitarist Adam Borecki that performs in many musical styles including classical, jazz, pop and klezmer for special events throughout the Los Angeles area.

Wright has received many national and international musical honors throughout his career, most recently earning Second Prize at the 2017 Backun International Clarinet Competition and Honorable Mention at the 2017 William C. Byrd International Young Artists Competition. He won the 2016 Frances Walton Competition and the 2016 MTNA California Young Artist Woodwind Competition. He has performed as a concerto soloist with several ensembles including Rice University’s Shepherd School Symphony, Drake University’s Symphony Orchestra, the Masterworks Festival Orchestra, the Meyer Chamber Orchestra, the Des Moines Metro Concert Band and the Orange County Youth Symphony Orchestra.
He earned a doctorate in clarinet performance from University of Southern California, a master's in music from Rice University and a bachelor's degree from Drake University. He also completed performance minors in saxophone at Drake and piano at USC.

Admission is free, but donations will be accepted. For more information, contact Nita Sinaga at dsinaga@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3305.

Conejo Valley 41st Annual Interfaith Thanksgiving Service
Wednesday, Nov. 22, 7 p.m.
Gilbert Arena

Cal Lutheran is proud to host this 41st annual interfaith Thanksgiving service with members of different communities in the Conejo Valley. Come celebrate with songs and words of inspiration, and give thanks for the richness of our lives and friendships.
Admission is free. Arrive early to allow time for parking and seating. Cal Lutheran’s offices of Campus Ministry and Congregational Relations are sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Rabbi Belle Michael at bmichae@callutheran.edu.

 
Photograph by Joshua Curry
Photograph by Joshua Curry
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"Ian Balding Surfboards" by Photographer by Joshua Curry
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"Workout" - Photograph by Joshua Curry
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Photograph by Joshua Curry
Photograph by Joshua Curry
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Photograph by Joshua Curry
Photograph by Joshua Curry
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Photograph by Joshua Curry
Photograph by Joshua Curry
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Photograph by Joshua Curry
Photograph by Joshua Curry
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The Ojai Photography Club will feature photographer Joshua Curry as its guest presenter for October. The free event, “Defining Your Style,” will be held at 7 p.m. on Oct. 17, 2017, in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

Curry is a full time professional photographer working in the fields of editorial and commercial photography. Developing an individual style can be a challenge when assignments and clients demand many different subjects. His photographs include architectural interiors and exteriors, people on location, portraits, food, landscapes and seascapes. Working with art directors, editors and professional models, he creates images for advertising layouts, magazine covers, and newspaper and magazine articles.

A lively and engaging speaker, Curry will share his ten years of experience in forming his own style and present ways that visitors can analyze and define theirs. Style, he says, is about “what strikes us as an individual; why we like a particular image. It could be the lighting, composition, the type of camera lenses, or the subject matter.” In commercial work, his style is never static, and he has to be aware of emerging trends; so defining and redefining his style has been the norm.

Recently he has been reviewing his past photographs and looking for the consistencies that identify his individual approach. This is a project he recommends for photographers interested in learning more about their style.

After graduating from Brooks Institute in 2005, Curry immediately began working in the professional world as staff photographer for Wrightsville Beach Magazine in North Carolina. He soon realized the need to be adaptable because his work required shooting so many different subjects and locations. Using this opportunity to hone his skills, he quickly learned that simply capturing the image is a small part of the life of a photographer. Curry now lives in Carpinteria with his family and loves it there, especially since both he and his son enjoy surfing. His photography has appeared in Carpinteria Magazine, Food and Home Magazine, Edible Santa Barbara, and the Wall Street Journal. He says, “I am a coastal person, and will certainly be seen up and down the coast during winter as swells wash along the California shoreline.” For more information on Curry’s photography, go to: www.joshuacurryphoto.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 

California Lutheran University
60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks
callutheran.edu

Art in a Time of Reformation: Works from the Rodolfo Sanzana Collection
Through Thursday, Nov. 9
The William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

To coincide with the 500-year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, this exhibit includes art based on the Reformation from the collection of Chilean-born collector Rodolfo Sanzana. The paintings, sculptures and other works tell a story of life and art during the period before, during and after Martin Luther nailed his famed 95 theses to the door of Wittenberg Castle Church in 1517. Included are works produced by the workshops or followers of Lucas Cranach, Rogier van der Weyden, Hendrick van Cleve II, Abraham Bioemaert and Sebastian Vrancx.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, visit RollandGallery.CalLutheran.edu, email rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or call 805-493-3697.

The Tract Project
Through Thursday, Nov. 9
The William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

The invention of the printing press and moveable type completely revolutionized the dissemination of information in the 16th century and allowed Martin Luther’s ideas to be widely communicated through printed propaganda. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, the gallery is presenting this exhibit by Lisa Anne Auerbach that celebrates the life and power of paper pamphlets, leaflets and tracts.

The Tract House was founded in 2008 as a spread-the-word project inspired by the distribution model and graphic quality of religious tracts and first displayed at the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore. While most popular tracts are religious, The Tract House tracts can also be manifestos, diatribes, stories, rants, poems or lyrics. Visitors can take any tracts they find of interest.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, visit RollandGallery.CalLutheran.edu, email rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or call 805-493-3697.

Art History Presentation
News from the Front: Winslow Homer, Race and the Civil War
Frances K. Pohl
Tuesday, Oct. 3, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

In this illustrated presentation, renowned art historian Frances K. Pohl investigates several paintings by Winslow Homer that attempt to represent the complex roles of African-Americans during the Civil War.

Pohl holds the Dr. Mary Ann Vanderzyl Reynolds Professorship in the Humanities and is a professor and chair of art history at Pomona College. Her interests include art and politics in the 20th century United States and feminist art. Her major textbook, “Framing America: A Social History of American Art,” integrates her continental approach to American art with coverage of New France, New Spain and New England. She also has examined the work of U.S. artists who have traveled to Mexico and Mexican artists who have worked in the U.S.

Admission is free. Cal Lutheran’s Multicultural Programs and Campus Diversity Initiative provided a grant for the event. The university’s Art History Program, History Department and Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice and sponsoring the event in conjunction with the Thousand Oaks Library and the Thousand Oaks Reads, One City One Book program. For more information, contact Christine Sellin at csellin@callutheran.edu.

Current Trends and Challenges in Hospitality and Tourism
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 6 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

Cal Lutheran’s School of Management will present a panel discussion on current trends and challenges in the hospitality and tourism industry as the first event in the Executive Hospitality Management Series. The panelists will be Rudi Schreiner, founder and president of AmaWaterways; Alycia Harshfield, executive director of the California Restaurant Association Educational Foundation; and Tom Holt, founder and CEO of Urbane Café. Udo Schlentrich, professor emeritus at the University of New Hampshire, will moderate. Appetizers will be served. Admission is free but reservations are required. For more information, contact Jewel Soiland at csoiland@callutheran.edu or visit callutheran.edu.

Vulnerability inVisibility
Thursday, Oct. 5, through Thursday, Nov. 9
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

In this show, photographer Mary Fashbaugh explores the senses in human interactions, their limitations and our expectations of them. Her portraits of people are out of focus and abstract, except for details revealed beneath glass domes spelling out the sitter’s name in Braille.

“I am attracted to Braille for its visual and physical presence,” explains Fashbaugh. “It is a language that few learn to read unless necessary. It is frequently passed up on elevators and in public restrooms, blending in to its surface, visible only to those who seek it. It is the only language which requires direct contact with the external world. The usage of this language in my art works as a reference to material connection and the significance of bodily presence.”

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Bring Your Own Brain (BYOB)
A Day of Innovative Solutions for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, Oct. 7, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Swenson Center for Social and Behavioral Sciences, Room 101

BYOB is an all-day event seeking solutions to challenges faced by individuals on the autism spectrum. Following a discussion by panelists with autism spectrum disorder about these challenges, participants will break into teams to design solutions, or hacks, to address them. The day concludes with voting on the most innovative or creative solution, with a cash award presented to the winner.

Cal Lutheran’s Graduate School of Education is sponsoring the free event. Registration is required by Oct. 4. For more information or to register, contact Melissa Spence at 805-493-3087 or mspence@callutheran.edu.

International Film Festival
“The Grandmaster”
Wednesday, Oct. 11, 7 p.m. (doors open 6:30 p.m.)
AMC Dine-In Thousand Oaks 14

“The Grandmaster” is a 2013 drama from Hong Kong based on the life story of the Wing Chun martial arts grandmaster Ip Man, who trained Bruce Lee. The film was directed and written by Wong Kar-wai and stars Tony Leung and Ziyi Zhang.

The 130-minute film is in Mandarin, Cantonese and Japanese with English subtitles. It is rated PG-13 for violence, some smoking, brief drug use and language.

AMC Dine-In Thousand Oaks 14 (formerly Muvico) is located at 166 W. Hillcrest Drive. Arrive 30 minutes before the screening time to secure a seat.

Cal Lutheran’s Department of Languages and Cultures is sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Debby Chang at ddchang@callutheran.edu.

World War I and America
Discussion
Oct. 11, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center
Reading materials for the discussion are available at wwiamerica.org. Click the tab labeled Download the Project Reader PDF.
Oral Histories Reception
Nov. 14, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center
World War I and Sgt. York
Michael Birdwell
Nov. 14, 8 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

World War I and America is a two-year Library of America initiative bringing together the voices of veterans, families and others to explore the relevance of the war a century later. Cal Lutheran’s participation includes classroom oral histories from the families of World War I veterans, public readings and discussions, and a public lecture by World War I expert Michael Birdwell.

A history professor at Tennessee Tech University, Birdwell has studied the life of Sgt. Alvin C. York for more than a quarter century, working directly with descendants of the very highly decorated soldier. He is curator of the York papers in Pall Mall, Tennessee.
The events are sponsored by Cal Lutheran’s History Department, Pearson Library and Office of Veteran Resources and presented in partnership with The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, the National World War I Museum and Memorial and other organizations with generous support from The National Endowment for the Humanities.

Admission is free. For more information, contact Michaela Reaves at reaves@callutheran.edu.

Founders Day Convocation
Friday, Oct. 13, 10:15 a.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Each fall the university community, alumni and friends celebrate the founding of Cal Lutheran at this festive gathering. This year’s theme is “Reforming the Heart, Reforming the World.” The program includes the formal installation and blessing of university governing bodies and student government and the presentation of the Christus Award, which recognizes significant individual contributions to strengthening the bridge between the church and the university, or to higher education in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. This year’s award recipient is the Rev. Frank Nausin. The former Thousand Oaks resident is a 1970 graduate of Cal Lutheran and 1974 graduate of Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, longtime pastor to congregations in Arizona and California, former chair of Cal Lutheran’s Convocation and current member of the Board of Regents.

Cal Lutheran’s Division of Mission and Identity is sponsoring the free event. The Founders Day Convocation will be streamed at CalLutheran.edu/live. For more information, contact Marisa Post at 805-493-3589 or mpost@callutheran.edu.

William Rolland Art Center Dedication
Friday, Oct. 13, 11:45 a.m.

The new $8 million William Rolland Art Center brings all of the art classrooms and faculty offices under the same roof for the first time. They had been scattered among three of the campus’ oldest buildings, two of which will be torn down. The new two-story, 20,000-square-foot building also houses the Multimedia Department. The art center has drawing, painting, photography, ceramics, sculpture and watercolor/design studios along with lecture classrooms, a screening room, and computer, multimedia and editing labs. Filled with light, the building features high ceilings with exposed beams and ducts and many environmentally friendly features. For more information, call 805-493-3100.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec 8, at 12:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Adjunct faculty member Joseph Peeples will showcase the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the second Friday of each month. He will perform varied works for all audiences. Attendees are encouraged to bring lunch.

Admission is free. For more information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Founders Day Concert
University String Symphony and University Wind Ensemble
Friday, Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

The University String Symphony and Wind Ensemble will celebrate homecoming in this annual concert. The symphony, under the direction of new faculty member Yoshika Masuda, will perform masterworks from the orchestral repertoire. The wind ensemble, directed by Michael Hart, will close the concert with a mix of traditional favorites and works by contemporary composers.

Donations will be accepted at the free concert. For more information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu.

6th Annual Loop da Lu Family 5K
Kingsmen Park
Saturday, Oct. 14, 8 a.m.

The 6th Annual Loop da Lu Run/Walk will feature a new and improved course and provide lots of fun for the entire family. Participants who sign up before Oct. 1 will receive a shirt and be entered into a raffle for gift cards and Cal Lutheran swag. After the race, participants can enjoy Pancakes in the Park featuring freshly made blueberry hotcakes, sausage links and brewed Starbucks coffee for free. Non-participants can get breakfast for $7 for adults and $3 for kids. Registration for adults is $40 until Oct. 1 and $50 on race day. The cost is $10 for children 12 and younger. For more information, go to CalLutheran.edu or contact Jana Weber at alumni@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3170.

14th Annual Student Research Symposium
Saturday, Oct. 14
Oral Presentations: 9 to 10:30 a.m.
Richter Hall
Poster Presentations: 10:30 a.m. to noon
Ahmanson Science Center lobby and patio

Cal Lutheran celebrates the scholarly work of top undergraduates at this annual event. Their original findings, the product of full-time research under faculty mentors, are often presented at professional conferences and accepted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.

Funding for more than two dozen projects has been provided by Swenson Science Summer Research Fellowships, Darling Summer Research Fellowships for Applied Scientific Computing, John Stauffer Research Fellowships in the Chemical Sciences, the Jung Summer Research Fellowship for Biological Science, the Overton Summer Research Program in Economics, and Cal Lutheran’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships. Disciplines include biology, biochemistry, chemistry, communication, computer science, economics, exercise science, mathematics, music, physics and psychology.

Cal Lutheran’s Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Scholarship is sponsoring the free event. For more information, call 805-493-3796, email OURCS@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/OURCS.

Homecoming Concert
Cal Lutheran Choral Ensembles
Sunday, Oct. 15, 2 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

The Cal Lutheran Choir and Women’s Chorale open the season with one of their hallmark concerts, featuring exciting and innovative choral music. Wyant Morton will conduct.
Donations will be accepted. For more information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Martin Luther and Judaism
The Rev. R. Guy Erwin
Monday, Oct. 16, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

In working to foster respect and dialogue between people of many religious traditions, what should we do with the knowledge that, late in life, the reformer Martin Luther urged rulers to destroy synagogues, burn books and deny safe passage to Jews?

The Rev. R. Guy Erwin, bishop of the Southwest California Synod and a former Cal Lutheran faculty member, discusses why Luther’s anti-Jewish statements have been repudiated by churches including the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and how diverse communities can learn from and support one another in the face of misunderstanding and hostility. Following the lecture, a panel of respondents will offer insights on dismantling stereotypes and honoring our neighbors’ faiths.

Erwin earned his bachelor’s degree at Harvard University and two master’s degrees and a doctorate at Yale University, gaining expertise in Luther’s life, teachings and legacy. He engaged in seminary studies at Yale Divinity School and the universities of Tubingen and Leipzig in Germany.

Cal Lutheran’s Division of Mission and Identity is sponsoring the free event in recognition of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. For more information, contact Marisa Post at 805-493-3589 or mpost@callutheran.edu.

Thousand Oaks Reads, One City One Book
Cal Lutheran Faculty Panel Discussion
Thursday, Oct. 19, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

Cal Lutheran faculty members discuss the diverse themes of the Thousand Oaks Library’s One City One Book selection, “News of the World” by Paulette Jiles. The National Book Award Finalist for fiction tells the story of Capt. Jefferson Kyle Kidd, who travels Texas in 1870 giving live readings to paying audiences hungry for news of the world. Copies of the novel are available at both library branches.

Theatre Arts Student Black Box
Devised Works/Student Dance Concert
Thursday Oct. 19, through Saturday, Oct. 21, 8 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 22, 2 p.m.
Preus-Brandt Forum

Students have created an evening of original performance pieces based around a single theme. The pieces include plays and spoken word or visually oriented performances. Student-choreographed dance pieces selected for the American College Dance Festival in January will be included.

Cal Lutheran’s Theatre Arts Department is sponsoring the free performance. For more information, call 805-493-3452.

Just Go in Looking Good: The Resistance, Resilience and Kinship-Building of Trans College Students
Wednesday, Oct. 25, 5:30 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

Z Nicolazzo, an assistant professor of higher education and student affairs at Northern Illinois University, will discuss the experiences of transgender college students and what they can teach everyone about envisioning more equitable and just educational spaces. Nicolazzo teaches courses on college student development, postsecondary access, and diversity, equity and culture. The speaker’s research centers on trans collegians with an emphasis on resilience and kinship-building. Nicolazzo has written for a variety of scholarly and practitioner-focused publications including the Journal of LGBT Youth, Journal of Diversity in Higher Education and About Campus. The speaker earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from Roger Williams University, a master’s in college student personnel from Western Illinois University and a doctorate in student affairs in higher education and a graduate certificate in women’s, gender and sexuality studies from Miami University. Admission is free but registration is required. For more information or to register, go to callutheran.edu or contact Jo Petersen at jpetersen@callutheran.edu or 805-493-3422.

Día de Los Muertos
Thursday, Oct. 26, 5-7:30 p.m.
Ullman Commons back patio

Join the Cal Lutheran community and the Latin American Student Organization in honoring the lives of our deceased loved ones on Día de los Muertos, a holiday celebrated throughout Mexico and Central and South America. The evening includes family-friendly activities such as arts and crafts and face painting, plus raffles, desserts and music. A traditional altar will be displayed and community members are welcome to bring pictures of loved ones to be included.

Cal Lutheran’s Multicultural Programs Office is sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Carolina Zuniga-Mejia at czunigam@callutheran.edu or Carina Perez at cperez@callutheran.edu.

Franzen Organ Recital Series
Bruce Neswick
Friday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

In celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, Bruce Neswick will perform the first concert of the 2017-2018 Orvil and Gloria Franzen Organ Program Series. Neswick is in tremendous demand throughout the country as organist, improviser, choral conductor, clinician, composer, and hymn festival creator and leader. His playing is expertly crafted and full of radiant color.

Admission is free. For more information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu.

2017 Susan Greiser Price Arts and Learning Symposium
Reaching and Teaching Students with Autism
Saturday, Oct. 28, 8 a.m.–2 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

Arts integration provides a wide range of strategies to meet the social, emotional and educational needs of students on the autism spectrum. These instructional strategies inspire and engage students with autism and benefit other learners.

With an artists’ panel, breakout sessions, student performances and more, the symposium is designed to build working partnerships between educators and community members to strengthen arts access for all learners. It will offer interactive experiences and resources for high-quality arts education in preschool- through college-level schools serving students with autism.

Admission is free, but registration is required by Oct. 1. Cal Lutheran’s Susan Greiser Price Arts Integration Program and Autism and Communication Center is sponsoring the event in conjunction with the Autism Society of Ventura County. For more information, contact Laura Clark at lbclark@CalLutheran.edu or 805-493-3851.

Thrill the World Thousand Oaks 2017
Saturday, Oct 28, noon to 4 p.m.
Kingsmen Park

Thrill the World is a worldwide flash mob that honors Michael Jackson and raises charitable funds. In this tribute, participants dressed as zombies perform the Thriller dance synchronized with other dancers at Thrill the World events throughout the world. The Cal Lutheran dance party begins at noon and includes on-site instruction, zombie makeup, refreshments with a small donation, and fun for kids. Those who officially register as dancers will be counted in the Guinness Book of World Records attempt for the largest flash mob ever. Global performance of the dance is at 3 p.m.

Cal Lutheran’s Theatre Arts Department is sponsoring the free event, but donations will be gratefully accepted for World Dance for Humanity. This Santa Barbara-based organization supports community and small business development in Rwanda and sends disaster relief funds wherever the need arises. For more information, contact Barbara Wegher-Thompson at 805-241-8515 or wegher@callutheran.edu.

Reformation 500 Worship Celebration
Samuelson Chapel
Saturday, Oct. 28, 4:30 p.m.

The Channel Islands Conference of the Southwest California Synod, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and California Lutheran University will host a worship service to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. As Lutherans look back upon the history of the Reformation and the theological tradition launched through Luther’s teachings, they also look forward to the future as God’s grace given freely continues to animate lives of service toward neighbors. A light reception will follow.

The Channel Islands Conference Collegium and Cal Lutheran’s Division of Mission and Identity are sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Marisa Post at 805-493-3589 or mpost@callutheran.edu.