Drone Photography – It’s All About Altitude
All photographs by Chuck Place.
All photographs by Chuck Place.
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Ojai, CA - The Ojai Photography Community (OPC) will host Santa Barbara based photographer, Chuck Place, presenting “Drone Photography - It’s All About Altitude,” on June 18 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai CA. The OPC invites the public to attend this free event.

In his presentation Place will cover the exciting new field of drone photography. He will share his experiences and the expertise he has achieved in shooting aerial photographs for hospitality, construction and real estate clients. His illustrated talk will feature a selection of the stunning images he has created utilizing a drone. He will discuss the unique advantages of drones as well as their safety issues. Their advantages provide the photographer with a perspective impossible either at ground level or at the higher level of an airplane. Along with aerial capability, drones remain quiet and cost little compared to standard aircraft. Safety is of paramount importance: “Essentially you are flying a four-bladed weed whacker,” Place says, and advises photographers to put safety in the forefront of their minds at all times.

Summing up his presentation, Place writes: ”Often I am asked if composing a photograph with a drone is the same as creating an image at ground level. The answer is yes—and no. It is similar, of course, but being able to make large adjustments to the altitude of a camera adds a whole new dimension to the process. ‘Drone Photography—It’s All About Altitude’ discusses the similarities and the differences when you are shooting with essentially a tripod that extends from 1 foot to 400 feet. That changes everything!”

Place is a highly successful commercial and editorial photographer with over thirty years of experience and an extensive list of clients. His images have appeared in National Geographic, Sunset, Islands, Time, Westways and Smithsonian magazines, as well as many other leading publications. His corporate and institutional clients include Patagonia, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Biltmore Hotel and the University of California, to name a few. He has worked with a wide array of major book publishers, from Prentice Hall to Lonely Planet.

An outstanding educator, Place taught for twelve years at Brooks Institute. He is now teaching photography classes at Santa Barbara City College. Visit his web-site for more information and images: https://www.chuckplacephotography.com

The Ojai Photography Community, which is devoted to inspiration, camaraderie and education, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Monthly free presentations are part of the group’s community service and education outreach.

 


 

"Crescent Lake Shoreline" by Paul Roark.
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"Lava Beach Surf" by Paul Roark.
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"Jumbo Rocks" by Paul Roark.
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"Pompei Basilica to Vesuvius" by Paul Roark.
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The Ojai Photography Community will host Paul Roark, internationally recognized fine art photographer, presenting “Windows into a Black and White Reality” on Tuesday, May 21 at 7 p.m., in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Clara St., Ojai, CA. The event is free and the public is invited to attend.

One of the finest black and white photographers in the world, Roark discovered his forte in 1982 when a traveling exhibit with his photography was burglarized. The thieves took only his black and white prints, leaving his color images behind. Since that time he has specialized in this genre of photography, pursuing his passion for both the art form and its technical challenges.

Born in Glendale, CA, Roark grew up in a family involved with photography and art for three generations. He had access to a darkroom in his family home and achieved a mastery of photographic skills by his teens, winning awards for his work in high school. At that time he made a decision to pursue a practical career in his working life and continue with his chosen art form as a sideline. After winning a scholarship to UCLA and graduating with a law degree, he practiced as an attorney until early retirement. During the final fifteen years of his law career, he gradually transitioned into his second career as a photographer. In 1996 he moved from Los Angeles to Solvang, where he currently resides.

Roark’s approach to his art emerges out of his fascination with light, design and pattern recognition. His black and white images create a window into the inter-locking patterns of natural forms without the distraction of color. He constructs an overall design with a dramatic impact that attracts the viewer into smaller, interesting patterns, keeping the eye in the image as long as possible. Because of the extraordinary depth of detail possible with carbon inkjet printing, the viewer can discover layers upon layers of visual fields that continue to astonish the eye the longer one looks.

When digital black and white photography began to surpass film in the ‘90s, Roark found that the available inks for printing black and white digital images were disappointingly inadequate. Roark’s response was to create his own inkjet printing sets directly from carbon pigments, enabling an immense array of light-fast tonalities. Determined to make black and white photography more accessible and affordable, he has provided formulas and directions for carbon-based ink sets on an open-source, royalty-free basis. In another innovation, Roark has replaced traditional photo papers with cotton-based archival watercolor paper. The combination of 100 percent carbon pigments on this kind of paper is more archival and lightfast than silver gelatin prints.

Roark’s most recent exhibits include “Carbon on Canvas,” at the Gallery Los Olivos, and “Between Light and Dark,” at the Elverhoj Museum in Solvang. The Gallery Los Olivos, where he is Director and Manager, has a permanent display of his work. For further information and images, go to http://www.paulroark.com

The Ojai Photography Community, which is devoted to inspiration, camaraderie and education, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – Novem-ber. Monthly free presentations are part of the group’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

 


 

CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) Art Lecturer Christophe Bourély drew his inspiration for this year’s collaborative spring faculty art exhibit while he was driving.

“Sometimes there’s a traffic jam,” he said. “You look to your right and there’s a golf course. You have these manicured lawns that probably consume a lot of water, and there’s maybe a couple of golf carts and a couple of people on these hundreds of acres of land. And here we are stuck outside of the fences. It talks about the disparities that exist here and in other places.”

Bourély and Art Lecturer Larry Lytle then got to work and created “Country’s Club,” a whimsical yet pointed look at America’s golf culture. The exhibit is on display in the John Spoor Broome Library Gallery on the CSUCI campus from April 25 through August 24 with an opening reception from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, April 25.

For their artistic social commentary, Bourély created six 36-by-48-inch oil paintings while Lytle, a photographer, constructed three-dimensional dioramas ranging in size from 18-by-18 inches to 30-by-19 inches.

“Indeed, country clubs represent some of the most (un)fairways we are facing today,” Lytle wrote in their joint artists’ statement. “Aside from the destruction of our planet, they embody the rising inequality and injustice between the 1% and the 99%, the haves and have-nots. Clearly, country club memberships that are upwards of $500,000 in initiation fees and $25,000 in annual dues are emblematic of our ever-increasing income-disparity issues.”

For the exhibit, Lytle did a little golf research and learned the game that was a precursor to golf got its start in Scotland in the 15th Century.

“Two days after her husband was murdered, Mary Queen of Scots was on the golf course playing golf,” Lytle said.

Bourély says he does not play golf, but Lytle admits he has — on municipal courses.

The public is invited to the opening, which will feature putting greens, golf balls and clubs so guests can try their hand at the game.

Limited parking is available on campus with the purchase of a $6 daily permit; follow signs to the parking permit dispensers. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the CSUCI Vista Bus to the campus; the cash-only fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

For more on the show and the artists: https://art.csuci.edu/exhibitions/,
www.christophebourely.com/, www.larrylytleart.com.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is reimagining higher education for a new generation and era. We are an innovative higher education institution that enables students to succeed and thrive – serving as an engine for social and economic vitality that provides the intellectual resources necessary for a thriving democracy. With more than 7,000 students, 1,200 employees and 14,000 alumni, CSUCI is poised to grow in size and distinction, while maintaining one of the most student-focused learning environments in public higher education. Connect with and learn more by visiting www.csuci.edu or CSUCI’s Social Media.

 


 

The Ojai Photography Community will hold their annual Members’ Night on Tuesday, April 16 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA. The event, which features photography by members, is free and the public is invited to attend.

Members of OPC will present up to ten of their images that have a common thread. The photographic presentation might be of favorites, a series with a theme, a body of work, or images that tell a story. A narrative by each participating photographer will accompany the images. Some of the topics will be: reasons for selecting the images, the stories behind them, how they were made, and experiences in the field. The evening get together will be a way to encourage the growth of members’ individual art and showcase their photography. For further information, call (805) 646-8405.

The Ojai Photography Community, which is devoted to inspiration, camaraderie and education, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Monthly free presentations are part of the group’s community service and education outreach.

 


 

America’s Teaching Zoo at Moorpark College will host its annual Spring Spectacular during the weekends of March 16 and 23rd. This fun-filled family event features animal shows, kid-friendly games and food. This year’s activities will take place from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. on March 16, 17th, 23rd, and 24th at Moorpark College under the theme “Zootastic Beasts and How to Save them.” Visitors will meet guest animals and trainers from various industries, including Hollywood Paws and Saving Wildlife, among others. Guests can meet the zoo’s two new tiger cubs, Neil and Karma, as they play next to Ira the lion and Kadogo the hyena. Behind-the-scenes tours will also provide unique opportunities to see animal feeding and training up close.

America’s Teaching Zoo is also home to an important program that trains the next generation of animal stewards. The Exotic Animal Training and Management program (EATM) was established in 1974 to provide students with high-quality instruction in exotic animal care and training. Students get hands-on experience while caring for nearly 200 animals at the zoo.

the globe recruit EATM’s distinguished graduates,” shares Mara Rodriguez, a spokesperson for the program. “Each year our students work around the clock to produce their biggest fundraising event, Spring Spectacular, which invites the community to experience the very best of what our Zoo has to offer.” In fact, America’s Teaching Zoo was recently ranked among the top 100 places to take your kids in Los Angeles by Mommy Poppins Magazine.

Spring Spectacular is open to the public and ticket prices are $10 for adults, $7 for kids/seniors, and $5 for Zoo members; children ages two and under can attend for free. All proceeds support America’s Teaching Zoo and the EATM program.

Additionally, this year Moorpark College will host its second annual Spring Festival, a free campus-wide open house celebration from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Saturday, March 16 in conjunction with the first day of Spring Spectacular. Friends and families will enjoy carnival games, food, and shows as Moorpark College highlights its esteemed programs. For more information please call (805) 378-1441 or visit www.moorparkcollege.edu/zoo. Moorpark College is located at 7075 Campus Road Moorpark, California.

MOORPARK COLLEGE, one of three colleges in the Ventura County Community College District, was founded in 1967. It is set on 150 beautiful acres, nestled in the foothills on the southeastern flank of Ventura County, about 40 miles from UCLA, and approximately 75 miles from UC Santa Barbara. It is also a short drive from CSU Northridge, CSU Channel Islands, and California Lutheran University. Moorpark College was recognized in the Huffington Post in March of 2015 as the fourth-best community college in the nation. It has an excellent reputation for university transfer preparation, and its signature career/technical programs include nursing, radiation technology, biotechnology, and exotic animal training, which incorporates the world-renowned America’s Teaching Zoo. The college also offers a dynamic range of classes and programs in the visual and performing arts, and its pristine athletic fields and mild climate provide an excellent home for student athletes.

 


 
Free event is Tuesday, March 19, at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai CA.

"Snowy Sunday Morning" by Photographer Sharon Lobel
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"Pacific Sunset" by Photographer Sharon Lobel
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"After The Storm" by Photographer Sharon Lobel
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"Abandoned" by Photographer Sharon Lobel
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"Twilight Surf" by Photographer Sharon Lobel
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"The Ponte Vecchio" by Photographer Sharon Lobel
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Contributed by Ojai Photography Community

Sharon Lobel

The Ojai Photography Community will host award-winning travel photographer Sharon Lobel in a presentation entitled “All About Travel Photography and More” on Tuesday, March 19, at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai CA. The OPC welcomes the public to attend these free events.

Lobel will share her “Suitcase for Success,” packed with key elements for capturing stunning images while you are on the road. Her illustrated talk will include landscape tips, lighting, and ideas for photographing all kinds of subjects, from insects to mountains. She will cover her best tools and tricks in the field, as well as how to pack camera gear using simple tools. For anyone planning a trip this year, or even just dreaming about one, Lobel’s presentation will inspire them to dig deep into their passion and discover what motivates them to become a successful travel photographer.

Always ready to set off to find another adventure, Lobel has traveled extensively throughout Africa, Asia, Europe, Mexico and the United States. She is a National and State accredited Master Photographer and Photographic Craftsman, active in three professional photographers’ organizations, with multiple awards in each of them. In the Professional Photographers of Los Angeles County, she was named twice as Nature Photographer of the Year. She is a double international silver medalist with the Professional Photographers of America. Her awards in the Professional Photographers of California include Animal Photographer of the Year for 2016, and in January 2019 she was presented with the prestigious Evans-Kingham Award for her outstanding service to the photographic community. Her energy and enthusiasm spill over into a workshop and adventure business that she co-founded, called “Image Adventures.”

For more information and images, go to https://sharonlobelphotography.co

The Ojai Photography Community, which is devoted to inspiration, camaraderie and education, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Monthly free presentations are part of the groups community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

 

“Dear Diary…I’m fourteen, and people think I should be scared because I’m surrounded by violence, but around here it’s an everyday thing. The first thing I see when I get off the bus is graffiti on walls, beer bottles, filling trash cans, empty cigarette packs and syringes.”—Excerpt from “The Freedom Writers Diary.”

Camarillo, Calif., Feb. 26, 2019 — With drugs, gangs, violence, poverty and racial tension underscoring their lives, teacher/author Erin Gruwell soon realized traditional teaching methods were not going work on the 150 students she taught in Room 203 at Woodrow Wilson High School in Long Beach.

“Instead, we learned to make the class a safe place,” Gruwell said. “Safe from the societal ills outside — racial stereotypes, prejudice, toxicity in the teachers’ lounge.”

The students were being bused in from their neighborhoods, which were often violent — riddled with racism, drugs, gangs and hopelessness.

“These were kids of color coming into a lily white neighborhood,” Gruwell said. “They weren’t always welcome and they weren’t always embraced.”

With textbooks abandoned in a corner of the classroom, Gruwell turned instead to a teaching method that turned these 150 “unteachable” students into the original “Freedom Writers,” a group of students whose stories launched a book, a movement, a movie, a foundation and now, a PBS documentary entitled “Freedom Writers: Stories from the Heart,” which airs on March 28.

CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is one of six California universities in six different counties hosting an advance screening of the documentary. The campus and the public are welcome to attend the screening from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, March 13 in the Grand Salon.

After the 56-minute screening, Gruwell and an original member of the Freedom Writers will conduct a Q & A session and copies of the book, “The Freedom Writers Diary: How a Teacher and 150 Teens Used Writing to Change Themselves and the World Around Them,” will be provided to students in attendance.

First published in 1999, the book is a collection of gritty, authentic essays born in Gruwell’s classroom 25 years ago when she realized the lives her students led had grim similarities to young people who were growing up in the midst of war and violence — what Gruwell calls an “undeclared war.”

Instead of teaching students how to pass tests, Gruwell found a way to compare the students’ reality in urban America to the worst examples of war and violence throughout history. She worked side jobs to afford to bring guest speakers to the classroom and take field trips.

She had them read books about other young people trying to survive war and violence like “The Diary of Anne Frank” and “Zlata’s Diary: A Child’s Life in Sarajevo.”

Then, she encouraged her students to write about their own feelings and experiences and the “Freedom Writers Diary” took root and blossomed into a publication and a 2007 movie starring Hillary Swank as Gruwell. This year is the 20th anniversary of the book’s publication.

CSUCI Dean of the School of Education Brian Sevier, Ph.D., was a doctoral student at the University of Colorado Boulder when he first learned about Gruwell and The Freedom Writers. At the time, he was teaching an education course covering everything from school funding to lessons that were culturally relevant.

“One night in my graduate apartment, I was watching ‘Prime Time Live’ and Connie Chung did a segment on Erin Gruwell and the Freedom Writers,” Sevier said. “I ran as fast as I could to record the segment on my VCR. This was exactly what we were talking about.”

Sevier always remembered the reaction from the superintendent of Gruwell’s district, who talked about educators like Plato and Aristotle.

“They didn’t teach the page and what’s on the paper…they taught the people,” Sevier said.

And by teaching the people, the once-hardened teens discovered a new way to express themselves and rewrite their futures. Every single one graduated and attended college.

Reservations are required by visiting: go.csuci.edu/FW or by email to: csuci_events@csuci.edu

Limited parking is available on campus with the purchase of a $6 daily permit; follow signs to the parking permit dispensers. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the CSUCI Vista Bus to the campus; the cash-only fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

For questions call 805-437-3900.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CSUCI) is reimagining higher education for a new generation and era. We are an innovative higher education institution that enables students to succeed and thrive – serving as an engine for social and economic vitality that provides the intellectual resources necessary for a thriving democracy. With more than 7,000 students, 1,200 employees and 14,000 alumni, CSUCI is poised to grow in size and distinction, while maintaining one of the most student-focused learning environments in public higher education. Connect with and learn more by visiting www.csuci.edu or CSUCI’s Social Media.

 

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Friday, March 1, 12:30–1 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

University organist Joseph Peeples will showcase the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the first Friday of each month. Works performed will be of a varied character and suited to all. Audience members are welcome to bring a lunch and quietly enjoy the recital.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Cal Lutheran 48-Hour Film Jam
Friday, March 1 – Sunday, March 3
William Rolland Art Center

The Cal Lutheran 48-Hour Film Jam Spring 2019 is a campuswide competition in which teams of directors, writers, actors, editors and cinematographers are assigned a genre, a character, a prop and a line of dialogue. The teams have 48 hours to create a short movie containing those elements. The competition runs from 7 p.m. Friday until 7 p.m. Sunday.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Multimedia Department and the Digital Cinema Guild. For information, contact Alejandro Guzman at alejandroguzman@callutheran.edu.

Faculty Recital
Eric Kinsley
“Rare and Forgotten Chamber Music”
Saturday, March 2, 7:30 pm.
Samuelson Chapel

The ensemble recital under the direction of keyboardist Eric Kinsley has unearthed repertoire in several archives worthy of rediscovery. In this concert, musicians present Kinsley’s new edition for a quartet by Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach and chamber music at the time of Friedrich dem Grosen (Frederick the Great). The commonality of the selected sonatas by respected composers such as CPE Bach, Joseph Haydn and Luigi Boccherini is the obligato keyboard realizations.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

SAKURA Cello Quintet
Friday, March 8, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Experience a rich and colorful sound world like no other. A cello quintet hailed as “brilliant” and “superb” in the Los Angeles Times, SAKURA presents an eclectic program of music spanning eight centuries in dazzling arrangements, opening new vistas of expression by showcasing the warmth and scope offered by the sound of five cellos. Repertoire includes arranged works ranging from the vulgar to the sublime: Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, Debussy’s “Clair de lune,” Britten’s “Four Sea Interludes,” Corea’s “Spain,” and others.

Yoshika Masuda, a Cal Lutheran assistant professor of music and director of string studies, is a co-founding member of SAKURA.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Franzen Organ Recital Series
Richard Elliott
Saturday, March 9, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Richard Elliott, principal organist at the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City, will perform the spring concert of the Orvil and Gloria Franzen Organ Recital Series. Elliott participates in the daily recital series on the tabernacle’s 206-rank Æolian-Skinner organ and accompanies the Tabernacle Choir at Temple Square on the choir’s weekly radio and TV broadcast “Music and the Spoken Word.” As accompanist for the Tabernacle Choir, Elliott has performed as a recitalist in many of the world’s great halls and has appeared on numerous television and radio programs. For several years, he was assistant organist at the John Wanamaker Department Store (now Macy’s) in Philadelphia, home to the world’s largest functioning pipe organ.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Reel Justice Film Series
“Chavela”
Wednesday, March 13, 6:30 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

“Chavela” is a captivating look at the unconventional life of beloved performer Chavela Vargas, whose passionate renditions of Mexican popular music and triumphant return to the stage late in life brought her international fame. There will be a Q&A panel following the film.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice, the Women and Gender Studies program, and the Department of Languages and Cultures. For information, contact the CEJ at 805-493-3694 or cej@callutheran.edu.

International Film Festival
“Das Experiment”

Thursday, March 14, 8 p.m.
Richter Hall

This 2001 German thriller is based on the novel “Black Box” by Mario Giordano and deals with a social experiment resembling the Stanford prison experiment of 1971. Directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel and starring Moritz Bleibtreu, the film won several German Film awards including for Best Film and Best Leading Actor.

Admission is free. Shown in German with English subtitles. Sponsored by the Department of Languages and Cultures in conjunction with David Nelson of the History Department. Free street parking after 7 p.m. For information, contact Walter Stewart at 805-493-3436 or stewart@callutheran.edu.

Faculty Recital
Uziel Colón
Friday, March 15, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Pianist, composer and producer Uziel Colón, known artistically as UzC, presents music from his new album, “Intersections.” The recital also features original jazz arrangements of famous ’80s songs, culminating in fresh, original Latin jazz sprinkled with classical and pop music. Colón, the director of the Cal Lutheran Jazz Collective, will be accompanied by some of the best musicians in the L.A. area.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Bring Your Own Brain (BYOB)
A Day to Hack Solutions for Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, March 16, 9 a.m.–2 p.m.
Swenson Center for Social and Behavioral Sciences 101

BYOB is an event seeking solutions to challenges faced by individuals on the autism spectrum. Following a discussion by panelists who are on the spectrum, participants break into teams to design solutions, or hacks, to address challenges. The day concludes with voting on the most innovative or creative hack. Prizes of $50 per person will be awarded to the winning team.

Admission is free, but registration is required. Sponsored by the Graduate School of Education and the Autism Communication Center. For information, email Melissa Spence at mspence@callutheran.edu. To register, visit CalLutheran.edu/autism.

Hats and High Tea
Sunday, March 17, 2 to 4:30 p.m.
Gilbert Arena

The California Lutheran University Community Leaders Association’s eighth annual Hats and High Tea will raise money for student scholarships and educational grants.

Guests will enjoy tea with sandwiches, fruit and desserts. The afternoon will begin with a champagne reception and will feature music, a silent auction and a raffle.

Attendees are encouraged to cap off their tea party attire with a hat. Table sponsors and party hosts will decorate each table in a festive theme. Awards will be presented in categories including most creative table setting and wildest and most elegant hats.

CLA was founded in 1963 to stimulate community interest in Cal Lutheran’s academic, athletic and cultural programs. Members organize fundraising and social events throughout the year to support academic departments and student scholarships. The organization has provided nearly $2 million through the years.

Faculty grants support academic and cultural programs, many of which involve students and benefit the community. Scholarship winners are selected for their community service, leadership potential and academic achievement.

Tickets are $55 for adults and $25 for children. Sponsorships are available. For reservations or more information, visit CalLutheran.edu/cla or contact the University Relations Division at 805-493-3151 or fielding@callutheran.edu.

TRAC 2019: The Representational Art Conference
Sunday, March 31 – Thursday, April 4
Crowne Plaza Ventura Beach

TRAC: The Representational Art Conference is the premier international event focused on cutting-edge representational art in the 21st century – where imagination matters and the mind meets the hand. TRAC provides a platform for understanding the unique possibilities of representational art and perhaps some illumination about future directions. This year, we are especially interested in the relationship between imagination and 21st-century representational art.

Speakers include Cheech Marin, the comedian and founder of the Riverside Museum of Chicano Art; Tim Jenison, the obsessive genius depicted in the Penn and Teller film “Tim’s Vermeer”; Corinna Wagner, the author of “Pathological Bodies and Art and Soul”; and Roger Dean, the prolific creator of album covers for the rock band Yes.

Demonstrations of sculpture, painting and drawing will be presented by Julie Bell, Brian Booth Craig, Virgil Elliott, Teresa Oaxaca, Alicia Ponzio, Scott Prior, Alexey Steele, Boris Vallejo, Pamela Wilson and others. Visits to area galleries include discussion with exhibiting artists.

For registration costs, student discounts and the full schedule, visit trac2019.org.

 
Delayed by Borderline shooting, public shows slated

California Lutheran University has been invited to stage “columbinus” at the Region VIII Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, a particularly meaningful honor after the Borderline shooting rocked the campus and curtailed the originally scheduled public performances.

Students will perform the play about the 1999 Columbine High School massacre for festival attendees three times on Feb. 14 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.

Before the festival, the students will present free public performances at 2 and 7 p.m. Feb. 10 in Preus-Brandt Forum on campus. Director Brett Elliott, cast members, and Cal Lutheran psychology and criminal justice faculty will participate in informal discussions with the audience after each show.

The original performances were canceled as the university community dealt with the Nov. 7 shooting, which took the life of 2018 alumnus Justin Meek at a “College Country Night” attended by about 30 Cal Lutheran students, and the fires that began the next day. Instead, 160 people attended one free invitation-only performance.

Seven productions were chosen for the festival from among more than 200 in Southern California, Arizona, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada and Utah. Judges will select four to six of the best and most diverse from the eight regional conferences to showcase at the national festival in Washington. This is the fifth time a Cal Lutheran play has been selected for the regional festival.

“The students and the entire artistic staff worked hard to create this production, and it is a special honor to share it with the festival’s 1,000 attendees after the tragedy that our campus, our community and the country have endured,” said Theatre and Dance Department Chair Michael Arndt.

The 2005 drama weaves together police evidence, the shooters’ journals, and interviews with parents, survivors and community leaders to depict the shooting, what led up to it and the aftermath. It examines archetypes of adolescence, drawing on nationwide interviews with high school students.

In preparation for the production, the students watched documentaries on the tragedy, researched the shooters’ mental health problems and learned how the shooting changed high school culture. The intensity of the play, which features hate speech and graphic descriptions of violence, was difficult for them, but they felt the message was important. That feeling increased after Borderline. Counselors met with the cast and crew, many of whom knew Meek and survivors and some of whom evacuated or helped others during the fires, and they attended rehearsals and the private performance to help them process their feelings.

The cast features Clayton Currie of Ventura, Jonathan Irwin of Washington, Victoria Karr of Corona, Amber Marroquin of Costa Mesa, Jacob White of Palmdale and Jordan Erickson, Mahyar Mirzazadeh and Gabrielle Reublin of Thousand Oaks.

Tickets are available at CalLutheran.edu/theater. For information, call 805-493-3452.

 

Moorpark College Theatre Arts is pleased to announce auditions for its upcoming Spring 2019 production of SPAMALOT; a production based on the uproarious Monty Python comedy Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Auditions will be held Dec. 17, 18 and 19 from 3:30 - 6 p.m. in room PA-100 of the Performing Arts Center on the Moorpark College campus. Interested parties should bring 32 bars of sheet music, preferably from musical theater, and wear comfortable clothing for a dance audition. An accompanist will be present for the audition.

The Tony® Award Winning Best Musical, SPAMALOT retells the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, featuring a bevy of showgirls, not to mention cows, killer rabbits and “French people.” This performance is sure to have audiences laughing and marveling at death-defying dance and musical numbers. The 2005 Broadway production won three Tony® Awards—including Best Musical—and was followed by two successful West End runs.

“This will easily be the biggest production we have brought to our main stage in the last three years,” shares John Loprieno, the play’s director and chair of the Fine and Performing Arts Department. “My phone has been ringing off the hook since we announced the audition and I’ve had students practicing their various British accents since Halloween!” Anyone hoping to join the cast must also enroll in a three-unit Theatre Production: Performance class at Moorpark College. “With the insane comedy antics of Monty Python’s Holy Grail and 20 production numbers that feature show tune parodies, tap dancing, and Lady of the Lakerettes, how can you not have the thrill of a lifetime?” says Loprieno. “So, grab a shrubbery and your Finnish Slapping Fish and come out to audition!”

SPAMALOT will run March 7 – 24 with evening performances from Thursday to Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. in the studio theatre at Moorpark College. Tickets go on sale Jan. 15 and may be purchased through the Moorpark College Performing Arts Center Box Office at (805) 378-1485 or online at www.moorparkcollege.edu/pac. For additional information regarding SPAMALOT or the Moorpark College Theatre Arts Department, please contact Director John Loprieno at (805) 378-1469 or jloprieno@vcccd.edu. Moorpark College is located at 7075 Campus Road Moorpark, California 93021.

MOORPARK COLLEGE, one of three colleges in the Ventura County Community College District, was founded in 1967. It is set on 150 beautiful acres, nestled in the foothills on the southeastern flank of Ventura County, about 40 miles from UCLA, and approximately 75 miles from UC Santa Barbara. It is also a short drive from CSU Northridge, CSU Channel Islands, and California Lutheran University. Moorpark College was recognized in the Huffington Post in March of 2015 as the fourth-best community college in the nation. It has an excellent reputation for university transfer preparation, and its signature career/technical programs include nursing, radiation technology, biotechnology, and exotic animal training, which incorporates the world-renowned America’s Teaching Zoo. The college also offers a dynamic range of classes and programs in the visual and performing arts, and its pristine athletic fields and mild climate provide an excellent home for student athletes.

 
Raptor by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
Raptor by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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White Lily by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
White Lily by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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Sierra by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
Sierra by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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Orcas by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
Orcas by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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Morro Bay by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
Morro Bay by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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Hunt Gardens by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
Hunt Gardens by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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Death Valley by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
Death Valley by Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer
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Photographer Susannah Sofaer Kramer returns to the Ojai Photography Club as the final presenter for 2018 with a workshop on “The Wonderful World of NIK Filters.” The free event will be held on Nov. 27 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana Street, Ojai, CA.

Sofaer will demonstrate the functions and “tips and tricks” of the versatile NIK digital photography plugins. Opening up shadows, making details vivid, adjusting the colors in sunsets - NIK filters can fine-tune these and many more image enhancements.

She will also show the complete workflow from Lightroom to Photoshop to NIK that she uses in processing nearly all of her images. As the “Digital Diva” of the Ventura County Camera Club, she is an excellent communicator in photography and has created a series of YouTube tutorials for digital techniques.

Originally sold for almost $400, NIK filters were reduced in price to $125 when Google bought them some years ago and then began giving them away for free. Unfortunately this meant that all development of them stopped. Recently DXO Labs bought them from Google and have upgraded them behind the scenes so that they now open in the latest operating systems, for both PC and Mac users.

Sofaer is an award-winning fine art landscape, nature and portrait photographer. Born into a theatrical family in England, she was a ballet dancer, singer and actress for many years until giving up a stellar career to raise a family. She always needed a creative outlet, and as her children grew she became a competitive dressage rider at horse shows. It was there that she began photographing friends and their mounts, inspiring her to learn and further explore what she could do with a camera.

In Sofaer’s own words, “I love being in the countryside, not only photographing the beauty and grandeur of nature, but also those small intimate moments that tell the story of a time and place. Composing a shot is like setting the stage, then one only has to patiently wait for the light and the drama to occur.” Visit her website for her galleries of images at: https://www.sofaerphotography.com/about.html

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, the meeting will be on the fourth Tuesday. in November. Only members may submit images for review. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com

 
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
Photograph by Cindy Pitou Burton.
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The Ojai Photography Club will host Ojai based photographer Cindy Pitou Burton presenting “The Journey from Photojournalism to Fine Art” on Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Clara St., Ojai, CA. She will give an illustrated talk about the dramatic changes in her photographic work that grew out of her move from fast paced photojournalism on the East Coast to innovative fine art photography in Ojai. The event is free and open to the public.

Pitou Burton began her career as a photojournalist working for major media outlets in New York City, including the New York Times, NBC, CBS, PBS, as well as prominent magazines and corporations. After sixteen years in this high-powered field, she made an abrupt change when her husband persuaded her to move to Ojai. Although living in Ojai was a long-cherished dream for him, she missed the excitement of her work in the city. The rugged landscapes of the West Coast seemed strange, almost foreign, after her many years in the green countryside of the East Coast. All of her familiar photographic subjects had been left behind. When faced with such challenges, she explains, her attitude is always “Just say yes!”

Beginning with black and white images of her backyard and the surrounding neighborhood, Pitou Burton gradually transformed her work into highly experimental fine art photography. Exploring alternative processes, she mastered the techniques of Polaroid transfers and digital manipulation. Her close-up images of flowers on a light box created a stunning x-ray effect. She has experimented extensively with unconventional papers and produced numerous series of limited edition fine art prints.

With iPhone technology and travel, Pitou Burton has successfully combined her photojournalism and fine art expertise. She discovered that the iPhone offers new possibilities and also mimics her early transfer process, especially for large-scale prints. Emerging from her travels are painterly images of Vietnam, India, and the Galapagos Islands. From the inner mysteries of flowers to the faraway places of the world, she follows her “Yes!” wherever it leads.

Pitou Burton has had many exhibits in New York and California, has been interviewed for the archives of Focus on the Masters and is an active member of the Ojai Studio Artists. For more information and her images, go to http://pitouburton.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for review. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com

 
Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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Photograph by Marc Alt
Photograph by Marc Alt
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The Ojai Photo Club’s free monthly presentation for September will feature documentary photographer Marc Alt with “Shooting the American West.” The event will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, September 18, in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

For over one hundred years the romance of the American West has captivated the imagination of the world. The dynamic interaction of horses, cowboys and cattle has been the subject of countless films, television series, books, images and songs. Yet the gritty reality of life as a cowboy is still alive today, and Marc Alt travels across the Western states documenting the men and women who still ride and work in “the old ways.” He will present an in-depth look at cowboy traditions and trace their historical development from the ranchos of early California to the plains of Montana and the islands of Hawaii.

Alt will illustrate his presentation with work from his recent travels across Idaho, Wyoming, Nevada and California. His images will feature a wide range of diverse locations, from million-acre historic ranches where the cowboys still sleep in bed-rolls in camp to a local event that showcases some of the traditions of horseman-ship and stockmanship from the Spanish and Mexican period in California.

More of Alt’s work is at: https://www.marcalt.com and on Instagram: @marcaltphoto

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may sub-mit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 
60 W. Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks

Nsenga Knight: Other Stars
Friday, Aug. 17, through Thursday, Oct. 11
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

“Each of my artistic projects is responding to my self-reflexive question: Who am I and what is my place in this world? My artworks exist as invitations to examine new possibilities that broaden our collective imaginations and challenge traditional boundaries of race, nationhood and religion.” —Nsenga Knight

Knight is a first-generation black American Muslim woman from Brooklyn, and her work is influenced by Islamic geometric art and the black experience. In this exhibit, she works with geometric drawings, text paintings, photographs, oral history recordings and other media. Listen to the enthralling stories of black women in Brooklyn who converted to Islam prior to 1975. Learn about Malcolm X’s pilgrimage to Mecca in 1964, his last religious duty. See how 10th-century astronomical renderings relate to a sociological interpretation of pilgrimage.

Knight received a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania and has exhibited work at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art, the New Museum for Contemporary Art and MoMA PS1. She lives and works in Cairo, Egypt.

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at (805) 493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Mapping Meaning: Adventures in Cartography
Friday, Aug. 17, through Tuesday, Nov. 6
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

Stashed in glove compartments, accessed on our phones and glowing on the metro, maps show us where to go and what to expect when we get there. The geography they interpret for us is, however, subject to the shaping influences of time and power. Coastlines are altered by rising sea levels, lands are “discovered,” boundaries are disputed and conquered, and cultures are created and erased.

Some maps are statements and some are fanciful. Some are mistaken, inserting an island or angling a lake at odds with reality. All maps reveal perspectives and priorities of the people commissioning or making them.

This exhibit presents a variety of beautiful maps and ways of reading them, along with objects from the times of their creation. Works date from the 16th century to the present, including a collection focusing on Scandinavia, a depiction of California as an island, and maps of the heavens. The works were generously loaned from the Dr. Ernst F. Tonsing Collection. Tonsing will give a related lecture at 4 p.m. Oct. 19 in the Room 212 of the William Rolland Art Center, which is next to the building housing the gallery.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@callutheran.edu, or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

Entrepreneur Speaker Series
Wednesdays, Sept. 5, Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5 and Jan. 9, 6-8 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

The Entrepreneur Speakers Series provides an energetic environment where like-minded and passionate people come together to share their ideas and build relationships. Each event begins with networking and a bite to eat followed by a main speaker and discussion. Past speakers have included serial entrepreneur and equity investor Dave Brekus and the founders of Eggology, Urbane Café, Seed&Spark and Blue Microphones.

Admission is free, but registration is required. Sponsored by the School of Management Center for Entrepreneurship. For information, write to som@callutheran.edu. To register, visit CalLutheran.edu/Entrepreneurship.

Reel Justice Film Series: “The Unafraid”
Thursday, Sept. 20, 7 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

“The Unafraid” is a feature-length documentary that follows the personal lives of three DACA students in Georgia, where immigration status prevents them from attending the top state universities and disqualifies them for in-state tuition at other public colleges. Shot in an observational style over a period of four years, this film takes an intimate look at the lives of Alejandro, Silvia and Aldo as they pursue activism and an education and fight for the rights of their families and communities.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the Sarah W. Heath Center for Equality and Justice and the Languages and Cultures Department. For information, contact the CEJ at 805-493-3694 or CEJ@callutheran.edu.

Faculty Recital
Eric Kinsley, piano and harpsichord
Saturday, Sept 22, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Eric Kinsley will perform a piano and harpsichord recital with fellow members of the music faculty. The musicians will briefly introduce and play rare chamber and solo works of composers such as J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, C.W. Gluck, J.P. Rameau and Arvo Pärt.
Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

University Lecture Series
A Thousand and One Years Ago: 1000 CE
Wednesday, Sept. 26, Tuesday, Oct. 23, and Wednesday, Nov. 28, 7-8:30 p.m.
Lundring Events Center

In this series of lectures, with three more to come in the spring of 2019, Cal Lutheran professors will explore what life was like a millennium ago, that is, in about 1000 CE (or A.D.). What age was it? The Dark Ages? The Islamic Golden Age? The Heian Period? All of these and more? Come find out!

Sept. 26: “1000 CE: What Did the Simple Folk Do?” – Michaela Reaves, Ph.D., History
Oct. 23: “Devotion to God: Monks, Saints, Relics, and Pilgrimage” – Steven Shisley, Ph.D., Religion
Nov. 28: “The Turkish Expansion in the Islamic World: Ghazis, Sufis, and Mamluks” – Paul Hanson, Ph.D., History

Admission is free. Sponsored by Cal Lutheran and the Thousand Oaks Grant R. Brimhall Library. Funded by the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grant for “Lyceum: Humanities and Beyond!” For information, contact Cindy Keitel at ckeitel@callutheran.edu.

“The New History of American Slaveries”
Christina Snyder
Thursday, Sept. 27, 7 p.m.
Ullman Conference Center 100/101

American slavery began long before Europeans arrived in the New World. Evidence from archaeology and oral tradition indicates that for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years, Native Americans had developed their own forms of bondage. This should not be surprising since most societies in history have practiced slavery and kept a high proportion of the total global population unfree, according to archaeologist Catherine Cameron. If slavery is ubiquitous, however, it also takes on many distinct forms.

Christina Snyder, the McCabe Greer Professor of History at Penn State University, studies the intersections of colonialism, race and slavery, with a focus on North America from the pre-contact era through the 19th century. She is the author of “Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America” (Harvard UP, 2010) and “Great Crossings: Indians, Settlers, and Slaves in the Age of Jackson” (Oxford UP, 2017), which won this year’s Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.

Admission is free. Sponsored by the History Department, Alpha Xi Psi Chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society, and the Organization of American Historians. For information, contact Sam Claussen at sclaussen@callutheran.edu.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Fridays Sept. 28, Oct. 26, Nov. 30, 12:30-1 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Adjunct faculty member Joseph Peeples showcases the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the last Friday of each month. The works performed are of varied character and suited to all. Bring your lunch.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

Faculty Recital
Micah Wright, clarinet
Friday, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Micah Wright will be joined by pianist Hui Wu for an evening of clarinet repertoire and transcriptions. Music by Claude Debussy, César Franck, Leonard Bernstein and Sergei Prokofiev.

Donations accepted. For information, call the Music Department at 805-493-3306 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

 

The Naval Base Ventura County Surf Contest will showcase some of the best surfers in Southern California.

The contest, which will be held August 25th and 26th beginning at noon daily, is free and open to the public. This is an exciting opportunity for the surfing community to access some of the best waves Southern California has to offer. The Southern swell, submarine canyon, and sandbars cause a distinctive and larger wave break than at other local beaches. The event draws international surfing champions from around the globe, and 70 contestants are expected to ride the waves.

There will be live music throughout each day and for the first time, MWR will host a Cornhole Tournament offering prizes for the two-person team winners. A variety of vendor booths will be open during the event and food will be available for purchase.

The Las Posas Gate at NBVC Point Mugu will be open 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. both event days for visitors. All guests will be directed to a parking lot near the Surf Contest venue. During these times, NBVC residents and personnel will need to show their DoD ID to proceed to areas on base outside of the Surf Contest thruway and venue.

Photography is allowed only at the venue site and toward the ocean during the Surf Contest. No other photography of the installation will be allowed. The media is welcome.

For more information, please call NBVC Public Affairs at 805-989-8095 or 805-989-9234.

 
Free event to be held August 21, 2018 entitled “A Brief History of Portraiture”
Photographer and educator, Tim Meyer.
Photographer and educator, Tim Meyer.
Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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Photo by Tim Meyer
Photo by Tim Meyer
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The Ojai Photo Club will feature photographer and educator Tim Meyer as its presenter for August. The free event, “A Brief History of Portraiture,” will be held on August 21 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

Meyer will offer a fast-paced journey through the history of portraiture, spanning more than two millennia and including a wide variety of art media. With a lifetime of experience in photographic portraiture, he will discuss different artistic ap-proaches to creating portraits, from 600 BC to the present. He will illustrate how these styles have influenced the way we portray ourselves and how they continue to have an impact on contemporary photography.

Throughout his thirty-five plus years as a professional photographer, educator and author, Meyer has been internationally recognized and respected for his innovative style and technique. His photographic art has been displayed in both solo and group exhibitions and has earned multiple awards. His book, “The Portrait: Understanding Portrait Photography,” is published in four languages and has been adopted as a textbook in numerous colleges. A second book, “Light Shaping,” is also available worldwide.

As an academic educator, Meyer holds both an MA and MFA in art and photography. He taught full-time at Brooks Institute until its closure in 2016, and is currently an instructor at Mount St. Mary’s University, Los Angeles. In addition to many national education programs, he has lectured internationally in England, Germany and Mexico. His areas of expertise are portraiture and wedding photography; and basic, advanced and creative lighting.

Meyer’s industry achievements include the Professional Photographers of America’s Master and Craftsman degrees. He has served as a councilor for this organization from 2009 to the present.

Concurrent with his teaching, Meyer has maintained a successful portrait and wedding photography business in Santa Barbara. For more information and to view Meyer’s portfolio images go to: https://tmeyer.myportfolio.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may sub-mit images for review. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 

Resilient Women: The Art of Daggi Wallace
April 26 through Aug. 9
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

Painter and pastel artist Daggi Wallace is a member of the Studio Channel Islands community. This exhibition is a compilation of her most recent work including an exploration of water, a focus on the Berlin wall, and studies that relate to the #MeToo movement. Though it is not the case with her work in general, this exhibit focuses on portrayals of women.

Wallace was born in West Berlin close to the Berlin Wall in 1962. She uses the wall as a symbol for all the walls in life, including those internally built. She uses the wide-open spaces of the American Southwest and the freedom of bodies of water to reflect how she felt after immigrating to the United States.

“Focusing mainly on portraying the human condition and our connection to each other, my work always begins with a visual trigger that evokes a strong emotional response in me or with an idea I want to explore,” Wallace said.

Wallace’s paintings have been published in several books and magazines, including American Art Collector, Southwest Art, Professional Artist, International Artist, the Pastel Journal, Poets and Artists and Pratique Des Arts.

Cal Lutheran students Christine Dauzat of Chatsworth, Christian Duimstra of Rancho Cucamonga, Cristina Farias of Camarillo, Paris Notter of Westlake Village, Brianna Pinal of Vista, Evan Pine of Calabasas and Mikaela Wundrow of San Diego curated the exhibit as part of their Arts Management and Museology course.

The gallery is located in the Soiland Humanities Center at 120 Memorial Parkway. It is open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. For more information, contact Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival
Weekends June 29 through Aug. 5
Kingsmen Park

The 22nd season of one of the region’s most popular outdoor theatrical events features the Kingsmen Shakespeare Company’s performance of William Shakespeare’s “The Two Noble Kinsmen” and “Othello.”

“Othello”
Friday through Sunday at 8 p.m. | July 20-22 and 27-29, Aug. 3-5
Grounds open at 5:30 p.m. for pre-show picnicking and entertainment.

Racial animus, jealousy and revenge drive Shakespeare’s classic tragedy “Othello.” This masterwork of early modern drama features the playwright’s most famous and arguably best-crafted villain, Iago. In a tale that feels all too contemporary, the villain’s weapons of choice are his victim’s own prejudice and paranoia. Iago wields them with a merciless intelligence, smiling as he effects the ruin of the noble Othello and his naïve young bride, Desdemona, and dragging down the entire state in the process. Join us under the stars for this truly timeless masterpiece.

The Kingsmen Shakespeare Company is the professional theater company of Cal Lutheran. The nonprofit organization runs apprentice programs for professional and aspiring Shakespearean actors, an educational tour program in local schools and summer theater camps for youth.

General admission is $25 for adults, $20 for seniors 65 and over, $15 for students with ID and, as always, free for everyone under 18. Reserved lawn boxes have room for six and are available online for $90 to $110. For tickets and information, visit KingsmenShakespeare.org or call 805-493-3452.

Nsenga Knight: Other Stars
Friday, Aug. 17, through Thursday, Oct. 11
Kwan Fong Gallery of Art and Culture

“Each of my artistic projects is responding to my self-reflexive question: Who am I and what is my place in this world? My artworks exist as invitations to examine new possibilities that broaden our collective imaginations and challenge traditional boundaries of race, nationhood and religion.” —Nsenga Knight

Knight is a first-generation black American Muslim woman from Brooklyn, and her work is influenced by Islamic geometric art and the black experience. In this exhibit, she works with geometric drawings, text paintings, photographs, oral history recordings and other media. Listen to the enthralling stories of black women in Brooklyn who converted to Islam prior to 1975. Learn about Malcolm X’s pilgrimage to Mecca in 1964, his last religious duty. See how 10th-century astronomical renderings relate to a sociological interpretation of pilgrimage.

Knight received a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of Pennsylvania and has exhibited work at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art, the New Museum for Contemporary Art and MoMA PS1. She lives and works in Cairo, Egypt.

Admission is free. The Kwan Fong Gallery, located in Soiland Humanities Center, is open to the public 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday. See Page tkt for parking. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at (805) 493-3697 or visit CalLutheran.edu/kwanfong.

Mapping Meaning: Adventures in Cartography
Friday, Aug. 17, through Tuesday, Nov. 6
William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art

Stashed in glove compartments, accessed on our phones and glowing on the metro, maps show us where to go and what to expect when we get there. The geography they interpret for us is, however, subject to the shaping influences of time and power. Coastlines are altered by rising sea levels, lands are “discovered,” boundaries are disputed and conquered, and cultures are created and erased.

Some maps are statements and some are fanciful. Some are mistaken, inserting an island or angling a lake at odds with reality. All maps reveal perspectives and priorities of the people commissioning or making them.

This exhibit presents a variety of beautiful maps and ways of reading them, along with objects from the times of their creation. Works date from the 16th century to the present, including a collection focusing on Scandinavia, a depiction of California as an island, and maps of the heavens. The works were generously loaned from the Dr. Ernst F. Tonsing Collection. Tonsing will give a related lecture at 4 p.m. Oct. 19 in the Room 212 of the William Rolland Art Center, which is next to the building housing the gallery.

Admission is free. The gallery, located in William Rolland Stadium, is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For information, contact curator Rachel T. Schmid at 805-493-3697 or rollandgallery@callutheran.edu, or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.

Lunchtime Organ Recital Series
Joseph Peeples
Fridays Aug. 31, Sept. 28, Oct. 26, Nov. 30, 12:30-1 p.m.
Samuelson Chapel

Adjunct faculty member Joseph Peeples showcases the 2,109-pipe Borg Petersen Memorial Organ in 30-minute recitals on the last Friday of each month. The works performed are of varied character and suited to all. Bring your lunch.

Admission is free. For information, call Campus Ministry at 805-493-3228 or visit CalLutheran.edu/music.

 
"Climbing Cardinals" by Photographer Felice Willat.
"Climbing Cardinals" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"La Boca Tango" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Jemma_El_Fnaa" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Molokai Maidens" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Water Bearer" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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"Women at Work Sasoon Harbor" by Photographer Felice Willat.
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The Ojai Photography Club will feature fine-art photographer Felice Willat as the presenter for June. The event, “Lifescapes,” is free and open to the public and will be held June 19 at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana Road, Ojai CA.

“Lifescapes” is Willat’s name for images that focus on the interconnection between the landscape and its human inhabitants. A world traveler for many years, she has found the traditional genres of landscape photography and portraiture unsatisfying for her vision. Creating a new artistic approach, she uses the lens of her camera to capture the moment when the human and the landscape are revealed to be inseparable. Although her images have been taken during trips abroad, she does not consider herself a travel photographer. Instead, she identifies as an artist who happened to discover art while traveling with a camera in her hand.

The presentation will trace the evolution of Willat’s art over the past decade, beginning with a trip to Burma in 2007 through her most recent journey to India in March of this year. The talk will be illustrated with images from worldwide destinations including Burma, India, Argentina and Hawaii. She will discuss her meditative approach: how her camera provides a sense of stillness and presence. As she expressed it: “I could capture a moment, something sacred or common-place, an unconscious gesture, a tattered clothesline, a red plastic pitcher, or a worn prayer book. I like to leave the familiar, travel to far-away places, and find the gift of really being present.”

Willat began her journey into photography in mid-life after co-founding a successful time management company, Day Runner, and raising three children. Returning from a trip to India one year, she hung a few photographs in her office taken with a small point-and-shoot camera. A colleague commented that she had an eye for photography and this encouragement led her to take design and photography classes and coaching. In subsequent trips her art evolved into a meditation on the oneness of the human and natural world. Her images speak of the stillness that makes this interconnectedness visible.

Based in Santa Barbara, Willat has exhibited widely and won numerous awards for her fine-art photography. The venues for her work have included the Los Angeles Center for Photography, Bergamot Station, the Brand Library, and the Topanga Canyon Gallery, among many others. She has published a book of photographs and poems, “The Quiet Between, Song of Burma.”

For more information on Willat, go to: http://www.felicewillatphotography.com/

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com

 

The Ventura County Rose Society will hold its monthly meeting on Thursday, May 24, 2018 at the Ventura County Office of Education Conference Center at 5100 Adolfo Rd., Camarillo. Our program will be a "Double Delight Evening". Our speaker, Hetty Shurtleff, is a American Rose Society Award Floral Arranger who will show us how to do her flower arrangements. Our second "delight" will be a silent auction of garden items and other wonderful things that our members will be bringing in. It will be a fun and informative evening! The doors will open at 6:30 p.m. for advice from Consulting Rosarians and refreshments. There will be a little Rose Show at 7:00 P.M. and our program will begin at 7:30 P.M. Visitors are always welcome to our VCRS meetings.

For more information contact; Janet Sklar at 818-993-6622 or Barbara Morse at 805-499-1657. Our website is: www.venturacountyrosesociety.org

 
Photographer Luther Gerlach. Photograph by Scott Miles.
Photographer Luther Gerlach. Photograph by Scott Miles.
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The Ojai Photo Club will feature photographer Scott Miles as its presenter for May. The free event, “The Scientific Photographer,” will be held on Tuesday, May 15, at 7 p.m. in Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 W. Santa Ana St., Ojai, CA.

Miles developed a love for exploring the world outside his reach in the museums he visited as a child. Now he is a cultural heritage photographer, specializing in documenting objects in museums, private collections and at archaeological sites. Using advanced techniques, he creates highly accurate images for digital archives. His work preserves a permanent record of humanity’s achievements that can be shared with a global audience. He is passionate about sharing these treasures and will illustrate his discussion with images he has produced for museums.

Miles will discuss techniques for achieving professional quality image capture. A member of the faculty at Brooks Institute beginning in 2002, he developed a curriculum in scientific and technical imaging. He has had a longtime fascination with the power of photography, as he expressed it, “to make the invisible visible.” He continued, “Scientific phenomena and subjects that are too small, too fast, too slow, outside the visible spectrum of light, can all be revealed with the right im-aging techniques.”

Wrapping up the discussion, Miles will preview his current installation art projects. He is creating two high-speed video installation pieces that will be placed at The Blackboard Gallery in Camarillo in November. These pieces use slow-motion (high frame rate capture) video and other installation components to explore our relationship with time and space. For more on Miles see his website at: http://thescientificphotographer.com

Monthly free presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. The general public is always welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com