The Ojai Studio Artists scholarship program has awarded to date over $150,000 to local student artists. On Saturday, June 6th OSA awarded $6,200 in scholarships to 14 Ventura County art students. Donna Granata received the $1,500 Beatrice Wood Award, Robert Nafie the $1,000 Otto and Vivika Heino Award, and Jamie Swan the $1,000 Ojai Scholarship Award. Two $400 scholarships were awarded to David Soto and Ashley Goodman. Kayla Petrucci received a $300 award from Rotary West of Ojai. Fourteen $200 awards were awarded to: Kristin Williams, Lynne Holmes, Kiernan Szakos, Jesse Sohn, Reiko Heartland, Damian Antonio, Sarah Law, and Elise Fedoroff.

A reception and award ceremony was held at the Ojai City Hall where the student’s artwork is on display until August 15, 2015.

Award winners are Jamie Swan, Donna Granata, Damian Antonio, Sarah Law, Kayla Petrucci, Jesse Sohn, Ashley Goodman, Kristin Williams, Lynne Holmes, David Soto, Elise Fedoroff, Reiko Heartland, Robert Nafie and Kiernan Szakos.

 


 
Rare, Original Tractors Illustrate the Evolution of Farming and Feeding Ventura County from 1914 to the present.
Rare, Original Tractors Illustrate the Evolution of Farming and Feeding Ventura County from 1914 to the present.
Enlarge Photo
Opens June 20, 2015

On Saturday, June 20, from 4-6 pm, the Museum of Ventura County’s Ag Museum opens “The Dirt on Tractors”, a display or rare (and still functioning) machines that exemplify the milestones of the development of the modern tractor. Intrinsically interesting and mechanically significant, each piece represents a major milestone in the development of the tractor; which harvested crops faster and more efficiently than their predecessors—farm animals—could. This efficiency was not only convenient, but also necessary to feed growing populations in U.S. cities. Currently, 3% of the population produces food for the other 97%.

In Ventura County, the mild climate, entrepreneurial spirit and abundant land conspired to create a thriving, necessary, job-creating industry. The County’s proud ranching and farming heritage is celebrated by this exhibition, and daily by the Ag Museum in Santa Paula. This exhibit tells the story of agriculture, business, sustainability and nutrition to visitors and students visiting the museum all summer.

Background and significance
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, America’s growing population pressured farmers to produce more crops faster and more efficiently. The only source of power farmers had were work animals such as horses, mules and oxen, which needed care and feeding. An adult horse would eat about three acres worth of fodder per year. Between 1990 and 1920, farm animals consumed over 20% of the crops harvested in the U.S. In 1915, the total land area dedicated to feeding work animals peaked at a staggering 93 million acres. As the 20th century unfolded, tractors quickly became the preferred source of power on America’s farms; one tractor could do the work of about five horses. By 1915, there were around 15,000 tractors operating on America’s farms; by 1930, the number of tractors had grown to over 1 million. This single technology is one of the most important innovations in the history of agriculture, allowing fewer people to farm more acreage; and meet the demand for food for a growing population.

The term “tractor”
The Hart-Parr Company, founded in 1901 in Charles City, Iowa became the first to be dedicated exclusively to the manufacturing of tractors. Their sales manager felt that the words “traction engine’ were too vague for a press release , so he coined the name “tractor” a combination of the words “traction’ and “power.” Their company merged with a few other machine companies to form the Oliver Farm Equipment Company in 1929.

Around this same time, the Holt Manufacturing Company manufactured steam, and then gasoline powered traction engines. Experimenting in 1904, Holt replaced the wheels on one of the steam traction engines with a belt of redwood planks bolted to chains, to great success. His company photographer claimed that is “crawled over land like a caterpillar”, which Holt quickly named his machine, registering the name “Caterpillar’ as a trademark in 1911. Holt Manufacturing is credited with being the first company to successfully manufacture a continuous track driven tractor.

The Internal Combustion Engine
Steam traction engines posed a danger to their operators due to potential explosion and fires started by errant sparks flying from their burners. U.S. inventor John Froelich of Clayton County Iowa, mounted a single cylinder gasoline engine on the running gear of his stream traction engine to see if it worked; it was a great success. It traveled at 3 miles per hour and he was able to thresh more than 1,000 bushels per day using only 26 gallons of gasoline without the worry of dangerous sparks.

Eventually, this configuration would lead to the first successful mass-produced, gasoline powered tractor by the John Deere Plow Manufacturing Company.

Items on display in the exhibition:

1. Yuba Tractor, 1914
(MVC Ag Museum collection)
This tractor was purchased new by Frank Baptiste of Camarillo; he bought it from the Yuba Manufacturing Company in Marysville, CA and had it delivered to Camarillo by train. This tractor has two forward speeds and one reverse. It traveled on two rear continuous tracks using a ball bearing system and is steered with a tiller style front wheel. Yuba tractors were manufactured until 1931.

2. Fordson tractor with Integral Plow, 1924
(Gift of Linda Droman, restored by the Farm Implement Committee, MVC Ag Museum)
Fordson tractors were the first mass-produced affordable tractors in the world; they were manufactured by Henry Ford & Sons Inc. from 1917 until 1920. Ford Henry Ford named his new tractor Fordson, because there was already a Ford Tractor Company in Minneapolis and because the Ford shareholders did not approve of tractor production. Henry established an entirely new firm named Ford & Sons Inc., which was shortened to Fordson.

3. Holt/C.L. Best Caterpillar Two Ton, 1927
(Gift of Perry Grainger)
The Caterpillar Two Ton was small and well suited to many tasks on smaller farms such as plowing, planting and powering farm machinery. Perry Grainger bought this tractor in pieces in about 1935; he rebuilt it and used into on his family’s Santa Paula dairy farm.

4. The John Deere Model D, 1930
(Loan from Jim Bushong, private collector)
The Model D was the first tractor to carry the John Deere name following Deere’s 1918 purchase of the Waterloo Gasoline Engine Co. There were a total of 160,000 being produced between 1923 and 1953

5. The Allis-Chalmers Rumely Six, 1931
(Loan from Jim Bushong, private collector)
Allis-Chalmers had pioneered the use of pneumatic rubber tires on its Model U tractors in 1932 and retrofitted some of the remaining Rumely 6 tractors with rubber tires.

6. John Deere Model B, 1936
(Gift of Larry Lindgren)
The John Deere Model B could do the same work as a four-horse team. The Model B-O was configured for orchard work, fitted with fenders to prevent branches from hitting the operator, and designed with a low air intake and a low exhaust. This Model B-O worked on a Santa Paula ranch since it was new; it was used on Larry Lindgren’s Santa Paula orange ranch for many years.

7. Ford 9N, 1942
(Gift of Larry Lindgren)
This tractor was the product of an agreement between Henry Ford and Harry Ferguson in 1938 to produce tractors using Ferguson’s own self-regulating three-point hitch system. The Ford 9N was the first tractor mass-produced with a three-point hitch. This one was purchased new by the Royal Oaks Dairy in Ojai.

8. Oliver 60, 1944
(Gift of Ed Russell)
Hart-Parr was the first company dedicated to the manufacturing of tractors in the U.S. and is credited with coining the word “tractor”. This tractor was made by their (eventual, through mergers) Oliver Farm Equipment Company. This one used to farm row crops in Somis. The closely spaced front wheels are indicative of row crop tractors of this period.

9. Allis-Chalmers WD-45, 1955
(Gift of Richard Keister)
The 1955 Allis-Chalmers WD-45 tractor featured a 4.cylinder gasoline engine, and a “snap coupler” system for ease of attaching implements, with a complete hydraulic system to raise and lower them. Allis-Chalmers bought Brenneis Manufacturing Company of Oxnard in 1940, and opened a new plant in 1959 which operated until 1982, serving Ventura for many years.

10. Massey-Ferguson 65, c. 1960s
(Gift of Pictsweet Frozen Foods)
The Massey-Ferguson 65 is an excellent example of the advancements made in lightweight diesel powered general-purpose tractors. This one pulled a viner through lima bean and pea fields in Camarillo, Oxnard, and Ventura. The tractor and viner harvested up to 125 acres per day and some seasons they operated ten hours per day seven days per week.

11. John Deere 5100MH
(Loan from Cal-Coast Machinery, Oxnard)
This tractor is the result of over a century of tractor design and innovation. Many of the features that evolved are clearly exhibited in its design.
Such as:
• Light weight for cultivating
• High ground clearance for cultivating higher crops
• Pneumatic rubber tires.
• Power takeoff, or PTO
• Hydraulic Three-point hitch
• Diesel engine
• Rollover protection structure

The Dirt on Tractors will be on view through February 29, 2016.

 


 
Shakespeare festival begins June 26 at Cal Lutheran

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - This summer, the Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival at California Lutheran University will feature “Measure for Measure” for the first time in its 19 years.

Weekend performances will begin at 8 p.m. on June 26 through 28, July 2 and 3, July 5, and July 10 through 12 in scenic Kingsmen Park. The festival grounds open at 5:30 p.m. for picnicking and entertainment. Michael J. Arndt, artistic director of the Kingsmen Shakespeare Company, directs.

First staged in 1604, “Measure for Measure” reflects some of the issues that were swirling around England at the time including immorality and accompanying diseases, the rise of a conservative Puritan movement and mistrust of rulers. Though containing many comic scenes and characters, the play deals with the darker issues of retribution, justice and mercy.

The Kingsmen production is set in the Montmartre district of Paris in the late 1890s. The political atmosphere in Paris was sharply divided between an ultraconservative Christian faction on the right and a socialist faction on the left. The artists and other residents of the Montmartre were held in poor regard although many of the wealthy bourgeois visited the prostitutes and clubs like the Moulin Rouge. The Kingsmen play will begin with a Moulin Rouge-type show featuring cancan dancers.

The cast is led by Harold Dixon as the Duke, Brett Elliot as Angelo, Rachel Seiferth as Isabella, Marc Silver as Pompey and Ross Hellwig as Lucio. Dixon, the former chair of the theater arts department at the University of Arizona, was last seen as Prospero in “The Tempest”and the Player King in “Hamlet” in 2013. Elliot, an associate artistic director who has been with the company since the first season, has played many of the major roles including Hamlet, Petruchio and Henry V. Silver, also an associate artistic director,has been in most of the festival productions since the first year and has portrayed Thisbe, Feste, Shylock and others.Seiferth lives and works on both coasts and last played Juliet in the 2012 Kingsmen production of “Romeo and Juliet.”Hellwig, a former student of Dixon, returns after last year’s performance as Orsino in “Twelfth Night.”

The Kingsmen Shakespeare Company is the professional theater company of Cal Lutheran. In addition to producing one of the area’s most popular outdoor theatrical events, the company provides apprentice programsfor professional and aspiring Shakespearean actors, an educational tour program and summer youth theater camps.
General admission is $20 for adults and free for those under 18. Individual tickets are available at the door only. Lawn boxes are $75 to $110. For lawn box reservations, visit kingsmenshakespeare.org or call 805-493-3014.

 


 
“Test for North Wall 5 Tapestry from the Communion of Saints Tapestry Cycle for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles, California” by John Nava, jacquard tapestry, 2001, 192” x 82”, Collection of the Museum of Ventura County.
“Test for North Wall 5 Tapestry from the Communion of Saints Tapestry Cycle for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles, California” by John Nava, jacquard tapestry, 2001, 192” x 82”, Collection of the Museum of Ventura County.
Enlarge Photo
June 20 through November 8, 2015
“Rachel with Pearl Earring” by John Nava, oil on canvas, 2007, 20” x 18”, Private Collection.
“Rachel with Pearl Earring” by John Nava, oil on canvas, 2007, 20” x 18”, Private Collection.

SANTA PAULA, CA – This summer the Santa Paula Art Museum will present John Nava: Selected Paintings and Tapestries, a survey of works by internationally renowned painter and tapestry designer John Nava. The exhibition will open with a reception on Saturday, June 20, 2015 from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Admission to the reception is $10.00 for museum members and $15.00 for the general public.

John Nava’s work ranges from commissioned public projects such as his well-known tapestries for the Los Angeles cathedral to portraits to social and politically themed works to images about the coastal experience of life in Ventura County. The exhibition will contain some works never previously shown in Ventura County and some, from private collections, will be here exhibited publically for the first time. A highlight of the show will be a magnificent 16 feet high tapestry designed by Nava as a test for his tapestries for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles.

Nava studied art at UC Santa Barbara and did his graduate MFA work in Florence, Italy. His work is found in numerous private, corporate and public collections throughout the United States, Europe and Japan. “We are excited to be able to share John Nava’s art with our visitors,” says SPAM Executive Director Jennifer Heighton, “Nava’s works are incredibly captivating and are made powerful by his masterful abilities as a painter and draughtsman.” The exhibition runs through November 8, 2015.

The Santa Paula Art Museum is located at 117 North Tenth Street in downtown Santa Paula. The Museum’s regular hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. Regular admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for seniors and is free for museum members and students. For more information, please contact the Museum at (805) 525-5554 or info@santapaulaartmuseum.org.

 


 
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
Enlarge Photo
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
Enlarge Photo
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
Enlarge Photo
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
Enlarge Photo
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
From the series Representación Topográfica by fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodriquez.
Enlarge Photo

Written by Contributors Myrna Cambianca and Letitia Grimes

For the month of June, the Ojai Photo Club changes its focus to the avant-garde, welcoming fine arts photographer Ricardo Rodríguez as its guest presenter. The meeting will take place on Tuesday, June 16, 2015, at 7:00 p.m. at Help of Ojai’s Kent Hall, 111 Santa Ana Street, Ojai, CA.

While most photographers are interested in creating realistic images, Rodriguez seeks to blur the line between representation and reality. In the meetinghe will deconstruct his process as an artist and raise a dialogue about how photography changes our perception of reality and time. This promises to be an adventurous and stimulating discussion, discarding established views of photography and looking instead at the dissonance between what we see and what appears in a photograph.

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Rodríguez has an acute sense of living at the intersection of two cultural realities, where appearances can be deceptive. He works with multiple intersections of materials, surfaces and spatial dynamics, using both film and digital photography as well as unconventional techniques such as photograms and installations.

After completing his BA at the University of Puerto Rico, Rodríguez moved to Southern California for graduate study at Brooks Institute in Ventura, earning a Master of Fine Arts degree in 2010. He was gallery curator at the Tool Room Gallery in Ventura and taught at Ventura College. His work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach, which is internationally recognized as one of the most significant collections of contemporary Latin American fine art in the nation. Recently his photography was featured in “Parallel Realities,” a collaborative exhibit with Janet Neuwalder, at galerie102 in Ojai. He is now living in the Los Angeles area, teaching art at Flintridge Preparatory School. Visit his website for extended information and images: http://ricardorodriguez.net

For the second part of the meeting, Ojai’s own local Renaissance man, Peter Bell-wood, will be on hand to bring his insightful and entertaining commentary to the monthly review of members’ images. Bellwood, a frequent contributor to Ojai Quarterly Magazine, has an extensive background in multiple fields, including screenwriting, acting, music, and the art of collage. Born in Yorkshire, England, he holds a Master of Arts from Cambridge University, and first came to the U.S. as an actor in the British satire shows, “The Establishment” and “Beyond the Fringe.” As a film and television screenwriter, his credits include “Highlander” and “La Femme Nikita.” His collages have been exhibited locally and he is a member of “The Household Gods,” voted most popular band in Ojai. He once ran for political office in Massachusetts on the platform “Not Insane.” He lost!

Monthly presentations are part of the Ojai Photography Club’s community service and education outreach. Visitors are welcome to attend.

The club, which is devoted to education, inspiration, and camaraderie, meets on the third Tuesday of each month, February – November. Only members may submit images for critique. More information is available at: www.ojaiphotoclub.com/

 


 
Thursday, June 11, 2015 at 3:00 p.m.

Join us on Thursday, June 11 at 3:00 p.m. for a live painting demonstration by artist James Martin. Upon graduating with distinction from the Art Center College of Design, Martin worked in the comic and advertising industry and spent many years as a freelance movie and advertising illustrator. His clients included Spike Lee, Steven Spielberg, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, The Grammy Awards, Mattel, and many others.

Martin was then employed at Walt Disney Feature Animation as a background painter working on such films as "Tarzan", "Atlantis", "The Hunchback of Notre Dame", and "Hercules". Currently he is employed at Dreamworks Feature Animation as a digital matte painter and texture artist. "How to Train your Dragon" and "Shrek 4" are some of his current credits.

While working in the commercial art industry Martin has also been pursuing a fine art painting career. He has participated in numerous exhibitions of his work in galleries and museums across the United States including the Santa Paula Art Museum.

ADMISSION
$4.00 Adults
$3.00 Seniors
Free for SPAM Members and Students

 

Seven bands will deliver a mix of music styles, from Latin jazz to rock ’n’ roll and rhythm and blues, at Santa Paula’s second annual Melody Hall Music Festival on June 6, from 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., adjacent to the California Oil Museum at 1001 E. Main St.

The Santa Paula Historical Society is organizing the free day of music and entertainment that will include dancing, food trucks and a fenced-in Beer Garden.

Festival-goers will have a large dance floor to kick up their heels for seven hours to a lineup of bands that includes Charles Law Band, Deuce, Juano & Friends, Bob DeSena Latin Jazz, Fender Bros., R&B Bombers and House Arrest.

“The festival is a tribute to the impact music has had in our community and a tribute to the musicians of Santa Paula,” said Festival Chairman Ed Arguelles of Santa Paula, who serves on the Historical Society board. As a former Santa Paula High School history teacher for 35 years, Arguelles said he sees music “as the catalyst that throws us back into history. It is difficult to think of one’s history without the impact of music,” he said. “History is so much more than written documents and photographs. It is art, literature, history, war, politics, sports, music. They are all pieces of the puzzle that make the mosaic of history come alive.”

The eight-piece Charles Law Band will start the festival at 10 a.m. with a high-energy wakeup call. Spectators and dancers of all ages craving country rock blended in “Santa Style” funk are certain to be impressed, Arguelles said. “Featuring a throbbing mixture of horns, strings and vocals, set to crafty and flamboyant syncopation, Charles Law is an experience difficult to miss.”

Santa Paula homegrown musicians Deuce takes the bandstand second. “They will reprise not only their riveting R&B sounds that have made them legendary artists and Ventura County Battle of the Band winners but also will mesmerize its popular fan base with a new song collection and style that is sure to amaze,” Arguelles said.

If Tex-Mex, oldies and soul music is your thing, you will not want to miss the electrifying rhythms and vocals of Juano & Friends who take the stage third. “Reserve your spot on the dance floor for their 55-minute song set as they always generate excitement among the multitude of their loyal music followers,” Arguelles said.

Nominated in 2014 for the Los Angeles Music Awards Solo Artist of the Year and again this year for International Artist of the Year, vibes/trumpet jazz artist Bob DeSena brings his polished showmanship and swinging Latin Jazz Band direct from Las Vegas to the streets of Santa Paula in the fourth set, Arguelles said. “His troubadours consist of seasoned musicians that will make for an entertaining and vibrant ensemble performing classic and Latin standards with energetic salsa flair.”

What would a music festival be without the blues? In the fifth slot are the Fender Brothers who have earned a special place in the hearts and minds of the music faithful for more than four decades, Arguelles said. “Known for their instrumental mastery and scintillating solo work, each member of this five-piece ensemble has earned special distinction among music aficionados of Ventura County.”

Festival-goers are in for a special treat as the 10-piece R&B Bombers, a powerhouse of talent, arrive in the late afternoon to jolt the crowd with the melding of genres and styles that incorporates 1940s big-band swing, modern blues, piano boogie and ’40s, ’50s and ’60s R&B, Arguelles said. “Making their first-ever appearance in Santa Paula, their four-horn frontline and big-voiced singer are sure to invigorate and test the stamina of the most ardent dance couples still boogying on the dance floor.”

The Melody Hall Music Festival will conclude with one of Ventura County’s most popular dance bands, House Arrest. “This seven-piece driving force delivers more than 20 years of performance history and its ability to keep music lovers enthused after six hours of solid entertainment value make it the perfect band to end the festival’s fantastic day,” Arguelles said.

New to this year’s festival will be the addition of food trucks. A special fenced-in Beer Garden will be provided within the exterior gates of the California Oil Museum Courtyard and no alcoholic beverages are allowed outside of its perimeter.

Made possible through sponsorships from local businesses and residents, the Santa Paula Historical Society is still accepting donations to support this free music event for Santa Paula. Private seating, parking and refreshments are available at a special sponsorship level. Donations may be secured by contacting the Santa Paula Historical Society by mail at P.O. Box 842, Santa Paula, CA. 93061 or by calling Festival Chairman Arguelles at 805-279-3415.

Melody Hall Music Festival
What: Melody Hall Music Festival.
When: June 6, from 10 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Free.
Where: California Oil Museum, 1001 E. Main St., Santa Paula.
Why: To pay tribute to local musical talent.
How to contribute: To become a sponsor or donate to the free festival, call Festival Chairman Ed Arguelles at 805-279-3415.
More information: Look for the Santa Paula Historical Society on Facebook to find more information about Melody Hall.

 
"Quietly" by Photographer Myrna Cambianica.
"Quietly" by Photographer Myrna Cambianica.
Enlarge Photo
June 6 – July 8, 2015

"Peace - Love" by Photographer David Baker.

This popular annual photography exhibit, presented by the Ojai Art Center’s Photography Branch, features the theme, “What does peace look like?” The adage "A picture is worth a thousand words" refers to the notion that a complex idea can be conveyed with just a single still image. The images created by participating artists have been selected and juried for excellence in expressing the essence of peace across a broad spectrum of photographic genres.

The opening reception will be held Saturday, June 6, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. The Ojai Art Center is located at 113 S. Montgomery Street, Ojai. Gallery hours are noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Website: http://www.ojaiartcenter.org

In collaboration with the exhibit there will be two additional events in the gallery. On Saturday, June 20, at 10 a.m., ten selected writers will read from their 75 word essays on the theme, “What Does Peace Look Like – My Dream Plan.” On the following Saturday, June 27, from 10 a.m. to noon, there will be a panel discussion with peace builders who are working in the Ojai Valley to bring a greater sense of peace to the community. These inspirational speakers will share the history and joys of peace building. A question and answer period will be included as well as information on peace projects in the valley,

For more information contact David Baker, Chair, Ojai Art Center Photography Branch, at 805 558-6460 or visit: http://ojaiacphoto.org

 
“Rachel with Pearl Earring” by John Nava, oil on canvas, 2007, 20” x 18”, Private Collection.
“Rachel with Pearl Earring” by John Nava, oil on canvas, 2007, 20” x 18”, Private Collection.
Enlarge Photo
June 20 through November 8, 2015
“Test for North Wall 5 Tapestry from the Communion of Saints Tapestry Cycle for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles, California” by John Nava, jacquard tapestry, 2001, 192” x 82”, Collection of the Museum of Ventura County.
“Test for North Wall 5 Tapestry from the Communion of Saints Tapestry Cycle for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Los Angeles, California” by John Nava, jacquard tapestry, 2001, 192” x 82”, Collection of the Museum of Ventura County.
Enlarge Photo

SANTA PAULA, CA – This summer the Santa Paula Art Museum will present John Nava: Selected Paintings and Tapestries, a survey of works by internationally renowned painter and tapestry designer John Nava. The exhibition will open with a reception on Saturday, June 20, 2015 from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Admission to the reception is $10.00 for museum members and $15.00 for the general public.

John Nava’s work ranges from commissioned public projects such as his well-known tapestries for the Los Angeles cathedral to portraits to social and politically themed works to images about the coastal experience of life in Ventura County. The exhibition will contain some works never previously shown in Ventura County and some, from private collections, will be here exhibited publically for the first time. A highlight of the show will be a magnificent 16 feet high tapestry designed by Nava as a test for his tapestries for the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles.

Nava studied art at UC Santa Barbara and did his graduate MFA work in Florence, Italy. His work is found in numerous private, corporate and public collections throughout the United States, Europe and Japan. “We are excited to be able to share John Nava’s art with our visitors,” says SPAM Executive Director Jennifer Heighton, “Nava’s works are incredibly captivating and are made powerful by his masterful ability to capture human expression.” The exhibition runs through November 8, 2015.

The Santa Paula Art Museum is located at 117 North Tenth Street in downtown Santa Paula. The Museum’s regular hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. Regular admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for seniors and is free for museum members and students. For more information, please contact the Museum at (805) 525-5554 or info@santapaulaartmuseum.org.

 

OakHeart Country Music Festival is no stranger to talent, with an all-star lineup featuring Easton Corbin, Cassadee Pope, Annie Bosko and Blackjack Billy. On June 6th over 5,000 people from across the county will be line dancing and boot stompin’ to some of the biggest names in country music today, as well as some very talented local bands. But the buck doesn’t stop at the music. Currently in its fourth year, OakHeart CMF is dedicated to more than just throwing a heck of a party. The Rotary Club of Westlake Village puts on this event to raise money through tickets sales for local, national and international charities. The 2015 OakHeart Country Music Festival’s National Charity recipient will be the Wounded Warrior Project.

Brian Hynes and Troy Hale had a vision 6 years ago to bring something special to their hometown of Thousand Oaks. Both of whom grew up in the suburb of Los Angeles and attended the town’s two favorite annual events, the Chili Cook-off and Conejo Valley Days, along with their friends and families. Inspired by the excitement from the community, they developed a business plan to create an event for local and national musicians to be a part of - and discovered they had lots of support along the way: “The community has gotten so far behind it that I have people that I don’t know, I’ve never seen in my life, show up to a volunteer meeting and ask to contribute because it’s so close to their heart. It’s amazing you see the outpouring of the community, that part has been a bit overwhelming. I didn’t expect that”, said Brian Hynes. Now in its fourth year, it's on track to be sold out again, with thousands of dedicated fans, national recording artists, and sponsors such as Redbull, Guitar Center and the YMCA. The festival projections over the next few years are to expand into a two-day event, adding to the cook-off tradition, and bringing even more local and national musicians to the stage.

Thanks to the incredible support of its community, OakHeart is the festival it is today, donating its profits to charity, backed by an entire community, and lead by a family of friends who grew up together right here in town. The heart of the city comes together once a year for OakHeart CMF for the love of country music, the love of our soldiers and the love of our community.

Complete festival information can be found at www.OakheartCMF.com.

About OakHeart Country Music Festival: 4th annual OakHeart Country Music Festival takes place at Conejo Creek South Park in Thousand Oaks, CA at 1pm on June 6. The 2015 artist line-up includes Easton Corbin, Cassadee Pope, Annie Bosko, Blackjack Billy, Eli V, Scotty Mac Band, and the Walking Phoenixes. Presented by The Rotary Club of Westlake Village, the Festival features 2 stages with local and national Country artists. OakHeart’s goal is to raise funds during the event to benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, Our Community House of Hope in Thousands Oaks and the End Polio Now Movement, which is funded by Rotary International.

About The Wounded Warrior Project: The Wounded Warrior Project’s mission is “to foster the most successful, well-adjusted generation of wounded service members in our nation's history.” Their main purposes are to increase the awareness of the needs of injured service members, to assist injured service members help each other and to meet the needs of injured service members through distinct programs and services. To continue these charitable services, WWP will need funds to support them and the OakHeart Country Music Festival plans on giving back. See more about WWP: http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/

About End Polio Now: The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is a public-private partnership led by national governments and spearheaded by the World Health Organization (WHO), Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). To date, over 2.5 billion children have been immunized, and Rotary, along with its partners, has reduced polio cases by 99 percent worldwide since their first project to vaccinate children in the Philippines in 1979. End Polio Now’s goal is to eradicate polio worldwide. - See more at: http://www.endpolio.org/

 
Kingsmen summer theater program in 30th year

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - The Kingsmen Shakespeare Company Summer Theatre Camp is adding a new Puppet Workshop to its offerings in its 30th year.

In the new session taught by camp director Aaron Anthony Bonilla, campers 8 to 16 will build and learn to manipulate marionettes. They will present a public showcase of scenes from “Romeo and Juliet.” The half-day camp meets in the afternoon.

In Beginning Shakespeare, children aged 8 to 12 will learn about the Bard, textual analysis, vocabulary, stage movement and combat techniques as they prepare to present a condensed version of “Taming of the Shrew” or “Comedy of Errors.” Training for 8- to 16-year-olds continues with Advanced Shakespeare, which covers Shakespeare scenes, stage combat, period dance and acting techniques in more depth and concludes with the presentation of an abridged “Macbeth.” This year, Advanced Shakespeare will be an all-day camp, and all-day and half-day options will be available for Beginning Shakespeare.

Musical Theatre for 12- to 16-year-olds will cover vocal technique, acting and dance and culminate in a performance of selections from a musical. The half-day camp meets in the morning.

Co-presented by California Lutheran University, the camp provides opportunities for children to learn theater techniques and try them out on stage while developing self-awareness, confidence and discipline.

Bonilla, in his second year as director, helped develop the curriculum and designed the teacher-development program for the apprentices who teach in the camp. A graduate of the Pacific Conservatory of Performing Arts, he has devoted himself to theater production, performance and education for 14 years.

Barbara Wegher-Thompson, who teaches dance and movement at Cal Lutheran and has been involved with the Young Artists Ensemble, will again teach Musical Theatre. Teachers, actors and Kingsmen Shakespeare Company members round out the staff.

Two-week sessions begin June 15 and continue through July 31. Classes will be held in the Cal Lutheran Theatre Arts Building and adjoining spaces.

The Kingsmen Shakespeare Company, the professional theater company of Cal Lutheran, presents the annual Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival each summer, coordinates apprentice programs for professional and aspiring Shakespearean actors and provides an educational tour program in local schools.

For more information, visit http://www.kingsmenshakespeare.org, call 805-493-3452 or email info@kingsmenshakespeare.org. Registration is available online.

 

The Ventura County Concert Band (VCCB) welcomes summer with our final concert of the season on Sunday June 7, 2015. Our program, “As Summer Was Just Beginning,” is full of cool musical favorites including marches and musicals along with big band and hot popular hits.

Escape for a while; VCCB free concerts will entertain you, and inspire the whole family. Sunday, June 7, 2015, 3:00pm at the Ventura High School Auditorium located at 2 N Catalina, Ventura. Doors open at 2:30pm. For more information, call (805) 289-7925 or visit www.facebook.com/venturacountyconcertband FREE

 
BiJian Fan
BiJian Fan
Enlarge Photo
Julia Pinkham
Julia Pinkham
Enlarge Photo
Andrea Haffner
Andrea Haffner
Enlarge Photo

Studio Channel Islands Art Center
Old Town Camarillo
June 4 – June 26

Three local artists, Julia Pinkham, Andrea Haffner and BiJian Fan, combine their talents and share their unique world views in a new show entitled Kinetic Lines. The show opens at Studio Channel Islands Art Center Blackboard Gallery, 2222 Ventura Boulevard, Old Town Camarillo on June 4th and runs until June 26th. There is an artist reception on June 6th from 4-6pm, on First Saturday – the day 40 art studios are open to the public between 10am-4pm. An artists’ talk will take place from 3-4pm on June 6th.

Julia Pinkham’s work is also strongly influenced by the natural world and organic forms. She blends spontaneous elements of chance with controlled, intentional mark-making, allowing things to appear in her art without pre-planning. She thus creates a dialog between unconscious impulses and purposeful and conscious “left-brain” deliberation. In her current series of gestural abstract paintings, she utilizes mixed media and acrylic on both canvas and paper. She often works with her brushes attached to long sticks in an effort to blend random actions with deliberate strokes to reveal the forms and occasional images that appear in her paintings.

BiJian Fan explores the aesthetic and physical properties of various materials such as paper, PVC, stainless steel and electroluminescent light, and shapes them into kinetic sculptures. Building on a tradition of paper art learned from his Chinese grandmother, he transforms two dimensional static material into three dimensional kinetic sculptures. These cutting-edge designs represent an evolution in space and time. For him, motion energizes the space and symbolizes impermanence in the Universe. Sound and light technology are integrated with his art to create interactive works that foster innovation through interdisciplinary collaboration.

Andrea Haffner’s art explores themes dealing with relationships, solitude, experience and complex human emotions. She collects her compositional materials from the richly diverse forms that exist in the natural world that surrounds her, often searching for objects in urban landscapes or rare gardens in the hills of Ojai. With an abiding interest in small containers, she is fascinated with the ways they can serve as both holders of precious things and deliberate points of focus. Through her art pieces, she creates an ever-evolving visual language and invites viewers to take note of parts of the world that would otherwise go unnoticed.

The Blackboard Gallery at Studio Channel Islands Art Center is located at 2222 Ventura Boulevard in Old Town Camarillo. Gallery hours are Tuesday 11:00am to 3:00pm, Wednesday through Friday 11:00am to 5:00pm and Saturday 10:00am to 3:00pm. For information visit www.studiochannelislands.org or call 805-388-1368.

 
June 7, 2015

As part of its First Free Sundays for Families program, the Museum of Ventura County hosts Abe Lincoln (presented by J.P. Wammack) in honor of its exhibition “The Changing Face of Abraham Lincoln.” Mr. Wammack, as President Lincoln, will give a talk on the biography and accomplishments of the famous 16th U.S. president, and “preside” over Lincoln-themed crafts sessions for kids from 1 pm to 3 pm.

Families are admitted to the museum free for the day, from 11 am to 5 pm, and can view the current exhibit on Abraham Lincoln in the George Stuart Historical Figures Gallery. It has been 150 years since the end of the civil war and the untimely death of this beloved president.

The crafts sessions will feature Lincoln penny necklaces or badges, coloring and drawing Abe and each of the U.S. presidents, and constructing log cabins with Lincoln Logs.

Abe will present his brief talk at 1:10 pm, 1:40 pm, and 2:10 pm. Make sure you take a picture with this historic figure!

 
"Celebrating 56 Years of Harmony in Fine Pottery and Music"

June 13 &14, 2014
Saturday 10 - 6 pm
Sunday 9 - 5 pm
Libbey Park, downtown Ojai

The Ventura County Potters’ Guild, one of 3 Pottery Guilds in California, is a collective of ceramic artists is made up of professional and recreational potters and ceramists; instructors from local high schools and colleges; as well as people with a passion for ceramics. The VCPG began with ten Ventura area potters who came together in 1957 to form a potters’ guild. They chose Ventura College ceramics instructor, William Winterbourne, to lead the group as “master potter” and pledged themselves to maintain high professional standards and to provide to the public examples of contemporary pottery through exhibits and local sales and mentoring.

This year’s spring sale on June 13 & 14 in Libbey Park, Ojai will be our 56th anniversary of celebrating the Guild's fine ceramic artists and Ojai's premier Music Festival. There will be a "Salt & Pepper" Competition that will be juried and there will also be a People's Choice Award table. Please come vote for your favorite piece!
In July 2010 the VCPG opened its first full-time gallery located in Ventura Harbor at 1567 Spinnaker Drive #105. The gallery is made up of 24 juried VCPG members who take turns working shifts and selling their wares.

Proceeds from pottery sold at guild events make possible demonstrations, workshops, a lending library of books and videos, scholarships to local ceramic students. Monthly meetings are generally held the 4th Monday evening of each month from September to May and feature guest speakers who present information or demonstrations in his or her field of expertise; anyone interested in pottery is welcome to attend. Demonstrations are planned.

Since its creation 57 years ago, the VCPG has become a non-profit organization, promoting interest in pottery making and appreciation of the ceramic arts. The Guild has grown from the original 10 to more than 135 members and has expanded beyond Ventura to represent much of southern and central California. Some notable past members include: Daisy Hassall, Otto & Vivika Heino, Frank Noyes, Jessica Prescott and William Winterbourne.

 

Free tickets are available for a June 14 screening of the recovered and recently restored 1928 Ramona staring Dolores del Rio. The movie will be shown at the San Gabriel Mission Playhouse on Sunday June 14, at 2:00 P.M. This event is the result of a unique historical partnership between the Ramona Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden West, the San Gabriel Mission Playhouse, the Los Angeles Theatre Organ Society and the Rancho Camulos Museum and National Historic Landmark.

What IS the connection among these groups? It’s all about Ramona.

Helen Hunt Jackson’s epic California novel, “Ramona” was published in 1884. It quickly captured the nation’s interest in the golden west. The Ramona Parlor of the Native Sons of the Golden West, a benevolent preservationist organization was chartered in 1887. San Gabriel, its current location, is known as the birthplace of Ramona. The first president of the Ramona Parlor was Reginaldo del Valle. The del Valle’s were the owners or Rancho Camulos which became famous as the “Home of Ramona”. Thus they share the Ramona legacy.

There were four known American movie versions of Ramona. The first was DW Griffith’s 1910 version starring Mary Pickford which was filmed on location at Rancho Camulos and it is shown regularly to visitors. The second was Donald Crisp’s 1915 version starring Adda Gleason which was filmed at Rancho Camulos and other areas in Ventura County. It is considered a lost film as only portions of one reel exist in the Library of Congress. The third was Edwin Carew’s 1928 version starring Dolores Del Rio. It was filmed in Utah and for many years was considered to be lost. The fourth was Henry King’s 1936 version starring Loretta Young. It was filmed in Monterey California and is readily available.

Director Edwin Carew's thought to be lost 80 minute silent film classic, which will be shown on June 14, was discovered in the Czech Republic having found its way there by way of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Republic. It was restored by the Library of Congress and re premiered in 2014 at the Billy Wilder Theatre of the UCLA Hammer Museum. A panel discussion including experts Dydia DeLyser and Phil Brigandi who were involved in finding and restoring the film will follow the screening.

The showing of the film at the historic 1927 San Gabriel Mission Playhouse, with accompaniment by renowned organist, Robert Salisbury on the playhouse's 1924 Wurlitzer pipe organ, will make this a memorable event.

Although admission is free, tickets must be obtained in advance at www.missionplayhouse.org.

In addition, after the panel discussion, at 4:00, there will be a $25 VIP reception at the Native Sons of the Golden West Ramona Museum to benefit the Rancho Camulos Museum and Nationa l Historic Landmark. The Rancho Camulos Museum is a 501(c) 3 nonprofit dedicated to the preservation of the Rancho Camulos National Historic Landmark (www.ranchocamulos.org) and educating the public about the historical impact of the 1884 novel “Ramona”.

Attendees will have an opportunity to interact with the panelists and other VIPs, view artifacts, and enjoy light refreshments. Contact cachristopher1@att.net by June 8 for reservations.

 
June 6, 2016

SANTA PAULA, CA – The Santa Paula Art Museum will host a Free Family Day on Saturday, June 6, 2015 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Artists of all ages are invited to join us in a free hands-on art making workshop to coincide with the Melody Hall Music Festival at the nearby California Oil Museum. Participants will learn how to create their own instruments out of everyday materials in this interactive workshop. End the day by testing out your creation by leading your own musical performance. The workshop will be free and fun for the whole family!

The Santa Paula Art Museum’s Free Family Day is being held in conjunction with the Santa Paula Historical Society’s Melody Hall Music Festival. Held in the adjacent parking lot located next to the California Oil Museum at 1001 E. Main Street, this free event will showcase seven outstanding bands that will range from Rock & Roll to Big Band Jazz & Swing.

Named for one of Santa Paula’s earliest night clubs the festival will provide a large dance floor, portable restrooms, food trucks, and entertainment starting at 10:00 am and lasting until 7:30 pm on Saturday, June 6. The public is encouraged to provide their own seating. Umbrellas and shade pop-ups will be allowed but only in designated areas. For more information on the Melody Hall Music Festival please call the California Oil Museum at (805) 933-0076.

The Santa Paula Art Museum is located at 117 North 10th Street in downtown Santa Paula. The Museum’s regular hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Sundays from 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. Regular admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for seniors and is free for museum members and students. For more information, please contact the Museum at (805) 525-5554.

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) music lecturer and professional musician Steve Marsh and his seven-piece "Hep Cats Swing Band" will help boogie the night away Sunday, May 17 during the Channel Islands Choral Association (CICA) "Swing Into Spring" fundraising gala.

The CSU Channel Islands Choir, directed by CI music lecturer KuanFen Liu, D.M.A. (Doctor of Musical Arts), will also transport guests back to the 1930s and '40s with classics like "In the Mood," "String of Pearls," "Sentimental Journey," "Boogie Woogie (Bugle Boy)" and dozens of other favorites that will get you on your feet to cut a rug on the dance floor.

"The swing feel is very contagious and lends itself to dancing," said Marsh, who helped organize the benefit. "We've got a soloist, Tony Galla from New York," Marsh said. "He sings all the Frank Sinatra songs and does a killer Ray Charles."

"Swing Into Spring" will be from 5 to 8 p.m. at Camarillo's Freedom Center at 515 Eubanks Street in Camarillo. Vintage clothing is not necessary, but encouraged!

Also on the program is the Pleasant Valley School District Chorus, who learned how to scat sing and bebop for their part of the show under the direction of their conductor, professional musician Daniel Newman-Lessler of Somis with help from CI student Jonas Lee, who carries a double major in Performing Arts and Sociology.

The $50 price of admission ($35 for students or seniors 65+) also gets your choice of dinner catered from Manhattan of Camarillo restaurant; Chester's Asia Chinese Restaurant and appetizers from the Adolfo Grill.

Enjoy a "Rocket Fizz" root beer float or a vintage cocktail from a no-host bar. Institution Ale Company will be supplying beer and a CICA patron has donated wine.

This is the first year the annual fundraising event has been open to the public. Money raised from "Swing Into Spring" supports the CICA, which in turn supports music education for local elementary school students.

The non-profit CICA funds the Pleasant Valley School District Chorus. Also, in collaboration with CSU Channel Islands, CICA also supports the CSU Channel Islands Choir, which is open to students, faculty, staff and members of the community.

Liu believes it's important to be all-inclusive and to serve everybody from eight years old to 80 because of the magic of music.

"Everybody comes here once a week from different backgrounds to harmonize and sing," Liu said. "That's powerful. They are communicating with their souls through music. Even though we have all these computers and gadgets, human beings long for those kinds of connections."

For tickets, click on www.cicachoir.org or call Libby Scott at 805-312-9130.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/

 

The Ventura County Potters' Guild welcomes crystalline glaze artist Marie Wright of Newbury Park. Wright attended her first ceramics class in Junior College. It was in the school display case that she first saw a crystalline glazed piece. She was just floored by it and wanted to learn how to do that more than anything. She asked her teacher and some fellow students how she could accomplish these beautiful glazes and they all said: It’s a complicated process – too hard for you. Don’t bother trying.

She took two semesters of ceramics in college, and then went on to do all of the things that good kids do – got the degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and then a great job as a research scientist. She very much missed the ceramics classes and never forgot that lovely crystalline piece!

Fresh out of college, childless, and with a bit of time, she decided to get back on the pottery wheel. It was wonderful. She said to herself: Marie, you’re a chemist now, surely you can figure out those difficult and beautiful glazes. It turned out that she was right!

Although what her teacher and fellow students said was true – the process of making these pieces is far more difficult and the firing process is extremely finicky compared to “regular pottery.” Unfortunately the failure rate is much higher when this is your chosen art form, but a small price to pay for the mysterious crystals that seem to float on the surface of the beautiful ceramic forms. Wright gains as much satisfaction knowing her customers enjoy owning one of her pieces as she got out of making it! Wright and family is moving in the near future to North Carolina and setting up a full time pottery studio. A dream come true!!

An introduction to successfully using Etsy to market will be presented.

Next program will be in September.
Some pieces will be on display for viewing and purchase.
The public is welcome to attend. FREE

Ventura County Potters' Guild presents: Crystalline Glazes by Marie Wright
Ventura Avenue Adult Center
550 N Ventura Avenue
Ventura, 805 648-3035
Monday, May 18, 2015
Doors open at 7pm
Program begins at 7:45pm

 
"Men Pulling Rope" bronze sculpture by Henri Louis LeVasseur
"Men Pulling Rope" bronze sculpture by Henri Louis LeVasseur
Enlarge Photo
‘Walk Through Time’ challenges views of America

Students in a new museum studies course are the curators for the next exhibit in the William Rolland Gallery of Fine Art at California Lutheran University.

Students in Arts Management and Museology designed “A Walk Through Time: American Made Manifest,” which will run from May 28 through July 30. A reception will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, June 6. Admission is free.

The students put together an exhibit exploring the evolution of a modern American identity. They wanted to challenge visitors to look at both the works and the idea of America through a critical lens and consider whether the American dream is truly attained.

Studying the work of curator Fred Wilson, who once displayed table silver with slave restraints at the Maryland Historical Society, inspired the curators to design the exhibit in order to add to the discourse on museum biases and exhibition practices and they eschewed the practice of presenting work for its aesthetic value alone.

Under the direction of Rolland Gallery curator Rachel Schmid, the students primarily selected works from the gallery’s permanent collection that had been amassed by the museum’s namesake and added additional art from other sources. Over several decades, William Rolland has accumulated an eclectic collection of art, including 18th- to-20th-century bronzes and paintings.

The class is the capstone course for three history majors specializing in museum studies. Breanna Drummond, a Fair Oaks resident minoring in art, previously interned for the gallery and will graduate in May. Daniel J. Hazeski, a Santa Clarita resident currently serving as an intern in the gallery, plans to pursue a career in museum management. And Erin Sommers, a Simi Valley resident, would like to become a museum historian, curator or archivist.

Designed by School of Management and Art and History department faculty, the course also attracted students from disciplines other than history. Sam Julius Frankel is a marketing communication major and artist from Thousand Oaks. Conner Johnson is a marketing communication major from Thousand Oaks who is graduating in May. Dylan King is a business administration major and art minor from Fair Oaks who currently works in the gallery. Haley Ramos is a business administration major from Los Osos with a marketing emphasis and art minor. And Joanna C. Van Nyhuis is a Winchester resident graduating with a degree in art.

The gallery is located in William Rolland Stadium at 160 Overton Court. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information, call 805-493-3697, email rollandgallery@callutheran.edu or visit CalLutheran.edu/rolland.