Measure taken to Protect the Public

The Ventura County Fairgrounds Board of Directors has voted unanimously to cancel the 2020 Ventura County Fair. The action comes amid unprecedented community stay-at-home and social distancing guidelines and was made to protect guests, vendors, staff and others during the COVID-19 crisis.

The Board considered ongoing guidance and updated information from State and County health care and government officials about the status of the coronavirus pandemic and the improbability that mass gatherings like the Ventura County Fair could safely and responsibly take place this summer.

“Every year thousands of happy faces come through the fair gates to enjoy the County’s most timeless tradition,” said Barbara Quaid, Fair CEO, “It is because of those smiling faces that we are completely comfortable with this decision. We are already looking forward to welcoming everybody back in 2021 when we will resume the 145thVentura County Fair. We encourage our Ventura County neighbors and friends to continue adhering to all public health guidelines so that we can all come together again in 2021.”

The Ventura County Fair began in 1875 and has returned annually, except during WWII when the Fairgrounds was commandeered by the United Stated military to protect the west coast. The 12 day VC Fair welcomes nearly 300,000 fairgoers each year and has an immeasurable economic impact to Ventura County.

“We are thankful to the healthcare workers and those who are on the front lines making extraordinary efforts to help others during this great time of need,” said Quaid, adding “ We are currently on standby to be utilized for emergency operations services at any time. We’ve partnered with Food Share to serve as a food distribution site and will continue looking for ways that we may serve the community.”

The Fairgrounds will begin hosting and planning future events once it has been deemed safe to do so. For more information and for updates regarding the fairgrounds please visit www.venturacountyfair.org or call (805) 648-3376.

 


 
A drive-by birthday parade helped Margaret Torres celebrate her 90th birthday on Tuesday, May 5th. Honking cars covered in birthday banners and balloons drove by her home for a half hour, bringing her flowers, gifts, and love. Margaret has been bringing tasty happiness to Fillmore for 40 years with her popular restaurant “Margaret’s Cocina”. She is pictured with her husband Rudy waving to her many friends. Happy Birthday, Margaret!
A drive-by birthday parade helped Margaret Torres celebrate her 90th birthday on Tuesday, May 5th. Honking cars covered in birthday banners and balloons drove by her home for a half hour, bringing her flowers, gifts, and love. Margaret has been bringing tasty happiness to Fillmore for 40 years with her popular restaurant “Margaret’s Cocina”. She is pictured with her husband Rudy waving to her many friends. Happy Birthday, Margaret!
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Thank you to the Fillmore community for “Coming Together, Apart” on Saturday, May 2nd for Fillmore’s Front Yard Cookout. During these uncertain times it’s nice to focus on what we can do with our families and friends for a fun day at home! Photos Courtesy City of Fillmore Facebook page.
Thank you to the Fillmore community for “Coming Together, Apart” on Saturday, May 2nd for Fillmore’s Front Yard Cookout. During these uncertain times it’s nice to focus on what we can do with our families and friends for a fun day at home! Photos Courtesy City of Fillmore Facebook page.
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Photo of the Week "a hayrake in a field of poppies in the Antelope Valley" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7D camera, Canon EF-S 55-250mm lens @163mm, Exposure; ISO 200, aperture f/22, shutter speed 1/30 second.
Photo of the Week "a hayrake in a field of poppies in the Antelope Valley" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7D camera, Canon EF-S 55-250mm lens @163mm, Exposure; ISO 200, aperture f/22, shutter speed 1/30 second.
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I get antsy often
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

Too many cases of COVID-19 confirmed here in Fillmore. I hear the Space Station is virus-free. But according to SpaceX, I am #2,946,012 on the ticket waiting list. Hmm, that's only 32 less than my readership. Interesting.

'Tis the season for prime wildflower or wildlife photography. I'm looking at four pages of ads featuring 'photography workshops' in my April issue of the Outdoor Photographer magazine. The following describes a few such photographic workshops.

~"James Kay photography workshops-New Zealand, Glacier National Park, Zion Nat Park, Canadian Rockies/Banff NP, Telluride, Grand Staircase-Escalante NM and Bryce Canyon NP." I want to go!

~"Jim Steinberg Photo Tours-Fall in the Colorado Rockies-Experience the beauty of the aspen and alpenglow in the San Juan and Sneffel Mountain ranges as photographer Jim Steinberg guides you on a journey to capture mountains ablaze in orange and gold." I want to go!

~"Strabo Photo Tour Collection-Northern lights & icebergs from Nuuk, Western Greenland. Your journey to Greenland goes through Iceland, making this an amazing adventure in which you will be immersed in the wild beauty of both countries." I want to go!

~"Russ Burden Nature Photography Tours - Join Burden on nature tours to an iconic US destination or the Serengeti in Tanzania. Russ is intimately familiar with every tour location. He'll teach you how to read light, create optimum compositions and improve your technique. Experience his contagious enthusiasm, motivation, knowledge and passion." Are we there yet?

I don't need Burden's enthusiasm or motivation, but the fact that he is intimately familiar with select prime locations excites me.

While living in Florida, I participated in a fishing tournament in South Carolina. The grand prize was $5,000, but I knew nothing about the lake. Fishing was from Friday to Sunday. I left Florida on Tuesday that week. At a local fishing camp, I hired a fishing guide that knew the lake. On Wednesday and Thursday, we fished at locations marked on his map of the lake. Ready? At the tournament's end, I finished second pocketing $3,000. Not possible without learning about the lake and its underwater topography from someone who knew the lake. Location - location - location. Landscape photography is not different.

When I see a great landscape/waterscape photo, whether online or in a magazine, I get antsy. I want to go there! The Internet and Google Earth Pro are handy planning tools. However, nothing done remotely (at home) can equal boots on the ground. A long time ago, around 1904, I learned that little is known about a location until you visit. Once there, I need to learn where I need to be to get the best photo of the iconic scene. I could learn on my own, and exploring is sometimes fun, but also time-consuming.

Knowing the best location from where to make once-in-a-lifetime photos is a tremendous benefit. There's value in a workshop leader who knows 'secret' photographic places. But I don't need their photographic expertise. I can compose and expose photos quite well on my own. I only want their invaluable guide service. And I'd rather the latter be on location to facilitate my getting a giraffe's portrait in the Tanzania Serengeti. Excuse me; I need to start a gofundme account.

The hay rake among the poppies, the photo of the week, which I took five years ago, was an irresistible photo op. I located the property owner who granted me permission to trespass. Driving by the property this year, I saw that the rake is gone. Happy photoing.

Send comments, questions or suggestions to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 


 
“Feeding the Front Lines” drive-thru food distribution members passed out food to farmworkers and their families in the Fillmore community on Tuesday, April 28th from 4pm– 5pm at Two Rivers Park.
“Feeding the Front Lines” drive-thru food distribution members passed out food to farmworkers and their families in the Fillmore community on Tuesday, April 28th from 4pm– 5pm at Two Rivers Park.
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The Corona Virus Crisis has underscored more than ever the importance and value that Farmworkers represent in Ventura County. Farming and farm-dependent businesses provide an estimated 43,000 jobs in the County, generating $2.2 billion in revenue and $76 million in indirect business taxes annually. One in 10 county residents rely to some degree on income derived from farming.

The impact Farmworkers have in our economy and the job they are performing during COVID19contribute mightily to our collective well-being. They areas important and essential as the job other first responders are performing to save lives during this pandemic. Regrettably, there is little acknowledgement of the vital role Farmworkers have played historically and certainly during this unprecedented COVID 19 pandemic.

For this reason, a group of business owners and community leaders from Ventura County have joined forces to provide food, support and recognition to the thousands of Farmworkers providing essential duties during COVID19 in Ventura County.

Feeding the Front Lines seeks “to feed our Farmworkers” by visiting farms during business hours to provide lunch or dinner for free to Farmworkers, as well as providing boxes of essential products and healthy boxed food to those who have not stopped their duties while the rest of Ventura County residents have to stay at home.

“Imagine that you don’t have hand sanitizer at home because you can’t find this product anywhere, imagine you don’t have a Costco membership to stock up on toilet paper or even have the money to be able to hoard anything! Imagine having to look over your shoulder in case ICE is in the area. Imagine you are the invisible people in your city, county, state and country, but you get up every morning to toil in the fields because you have to feed your family, pay your rent and do it everyday, whether you feel well or not. Imagine knowing you must work because you will not get unemployment benefits, a stimulus check and the president wants to cut your already low salary. Pressure, that is what our farm workers feel from sun up to sunset. Feeding our farm workers is the least we can do to recognize, appreciate, and acknowledge the work this “invisible” population justly deserves. They feed our country and the world and are the least appreciated workers in the country. The public needs to support our farm workers,” says Roberto Juarez, one of the volunteer business leaders who visited different farms to provide assistance and recognition to the Farmworkers.

On April 28th, the campaign Feeding the Front Lines will host a drive-thru food distribution for Farmworkers at Two Rivers Park in Fillmore, CA 93015. Following the social distance rules established by the County of Ventura officials, a group of volunteers will bring food trucks to provide hot meals, conjunto music, and boxes of fruits, vegetables, and assistant information for Farmworkers to take home to their families.

Volunteer Miguel Rodriguez stated, “Farmworkers are the front line that feeds our country. During the COVID-19 crisis, they have continued to work under conditions and wages that most people have avoided. We wanted to thank them by providing good food and live music as they continue with their difficult daily work. We also distributed food boxes and bags of fruit for people to take home because pantries providing meals have service hours between three and five pm, which may not be accessible for Farmworkers because they are working during these hours. It is very fulfilling to be able to appreciate the workers whose dignity is reflected on the very fruit we consume.”

The idea initially came from Restaurant Owner John Hinojosa from Ruby’s restaurant and Chef Juan J. San Juan III from Gloria’s restaurant, and immediately other community leaders, volunteers and business joined forces; even owners from restaurants that are closed donated resources. Feeding the Frontlines plans to continue regular food distributions specifically for Farmworkers throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and possibly beyond.

 


 
(l-r) Student of the Year: Isabella Palazuelos, Fillmore High School, Classified Employee of the Year: Amelia Dominguez, Teacher of the Year: Marsha Sisolak, Administrator of the Year: Beverly Garnica. Congratulations are in order for Fillmore’s Student and Employees of the Year. Each of the honorees are to be commended for the positive impact they have made on the Fillmore Unified School District. Thank you for your dedicated service and outstanding performance. The Board of Trustees looks forward to a future opportunity to recognize the honorees at a regular board meeting.
(l-r) Student of the Year: Isabella Palazuelos, Fillmore High School, Classified Employee of the Year: Amelia Dominguez, Teacher of the Year: Marsha Sisolak, Administrator of the Year: Beverly Garnica. Congratulations are in order for Fillmore’s Student and Employees of the Year. Each of the honorees are to be commended for the positive impact they have made on the Fillmore Unified School District. Thank you for your dedicated service and outstanding performance. The Board of Trustees looks forward to a future opportunity to recognize the honorees at a regular board meeting.
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Student of the Year
Isabella Palazuelos, Fillmore High School
Fillmore HS Principal, John Wilber, shared: “Isabella is the number one ranked student in the Fillmore High School Class of 2020 with a cumulative 4.51 Grade Point Average and is the first Fillmore High School National Merit Scholar in memory. This is quite incredible when you take into account Isabella's involvement in school activities and sports. Isabella does not merely participate in her sports and activities, but she is a leader and an exceptional performer in all that she does. Finally, her peers and the staff at Fillmore High School respect Isabella as a student of the highest integrity.”

Teacher of the Year
Marsha Sisolak
Marsha is a First Grade Teacher at Rio Vista Elementary, and has been an educator for 44 years. She has taught in Fillmore Unified schools for 34 of the 44 years. For the majority of her career, she taught kindergarten, however she has also educated second graders, worked as a district Instructional Coach, and is currently a first grade teacher.
Mrs. Sisolak is an innovative teacher and consistently goes the extra mile for her students. From designing creative learning opportunities that engage the entire class to using technology in a meaningful way in the classroom, Mrs. Sisolak guides her students to achieve their best each day.

Administrator of the Year
Beverly Garnica
Beverly Garnica is the proud principal of Rio Vista Elementary School. She has demonstrated outstanding leadership in her role as the Principal and achieved success in creating a student focused school community. She is a leader committed to student success and increased positive outcomes for her staff. Through her leadership, the campus created a “Kindness Initiative” involving all employees and students. Prior to becoming a Principal, Beverly has served with distinction as a Middle School Assistant Principal, and accomplished classroom teacher.

Classified Employee of the Year
Amelia Dominguez
Amelia provides inspired service as the Office Manager for FUSD Preschool. She can be trusted to the right thing for children in all situations. Amelia takes full ownership and responsibility for numerous daily clerical and office-related duties to ensure the smooth and efficient operations of all Preschools across the District. Her co-workers describe her as fair, knowledgeable, informed, steady, and possessing outstanding organizational and communication skills. Parents are grateful for her efficient, personable and respectful demeanor.

 
The Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley is pleased to announce their partnership with Fillmore Fire Department in efforts to make face shields. These face shield frames will be printed on the Boys & Girls Club 3D printers and available for first responders in Ventura County. “Our printers were sitting idle with no kids at our closed clubs due to COVID 19 so it was a natural partnership with Fillmore Fire to produce these face shield frames” states CEO Jan Marholin. We hope to reopen when it is safe and hopefully it is mid-June. Donations to the Boys & Girls Club can be made on their website at www.bgclubscv.org. Pictured is Jan Marholin, CEO, Chief Gurrola, Cesar Villanueva-Site Director Piru, Mari Soriano-Site Director Santa Paula. Courtesy SCV Boys & Girls Club.
The Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley is pleased to announce their partnership with Fillmore Fire Department in efforts to make face shields. These face shield frames will be printed on the Boys & Girls Club 3D printers and available for first responders in Ventura County. “Our printers were sitting idle with no kids at our closed clubs due to COVID 19 so it was a natural partnership with Fillmore Fire to produce these face shield frames” states CEO Jan Marholin. We hope to reopen when it is safe and hopefully it is mid-June. Donations to the Boys & Girls Club can be made on their website at www.bgclubscv.org. Pictured is Jan Marholin, CEO, Chief Gurrola, Cesar Villanueva-Site Director Piru, Mari Soriano-Site Director Santa Paula. Courtesy SCV Boys & Girls Club.
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Thank You to Our Healthcare Workers!
You may have noticed a beautiful Blue Heart lit up every evening next to the “F” on the hill above Fillmore. The FHS Alumni Association donated the lights to show support for all those who are on the front lines working hard during this COVID-19 pandemic — especially all the FHS Alumni who work in healthcare. We support you all!! Courtesy Mark Ortega, FHS Alumni President.
You may have noticed a beautiful Blue Heart lit up every evening next to the “F” on the hill above Fillmore. The FHS Alumni Association donated the lights to show support for all those who are on the front lines working hard during this COVID-19 pandemic — especially all the FHS Alumni who work in healthcare. We support you all!! Courtesy Mark Ortega, FHS Alumni President.
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For the past week many people have been seen going down to Sespe Creek to cool off from the heat wave this past week. Hope they all are abiding by the social distancing guidelines as well. Please, while you’re enjoying this rite of summer, keep the river clean by taking your trash out when you leave.
For the past week many people have been seen going down to Sespe Creek to cool off from the heat wave this past week. Hope they all are abiding by the social distancing guidelines as well. Please, while you’re enjoying this rite of summer, keep the river clean by taking your trash out when you leave.
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Norman Landond Morey with Dick Ahern at a work site. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
Norman Landond Morey with Dick Ahern at a work site. Photos courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum.
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Norman Landond Morey’s wife Ada Stone Morey
Norman Landond Morey’s wife Ada Stone Morey
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Elbert “Al” Morey, circa 1935
Elbert “Al” Morey, circa 1935
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Elbert Morey at 4 months
Elbert Morey at 4 months
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Al Morey with his model Trains
Al Morey with his model Trains
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Display at the museum
Display at the museum
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Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum

On July 16, 1901, Norman Landond Morey married Ada Mae Stone. Ada Mae was the youngest child of Joseph and Mahala Stone and had been born and raised in the Sespe area. Ada was 22 and Norman was 29. Norman was the son of Robert Herman Morey and his first wife. R. H., as he was known, came to California about the same time the Stones did, shortly after the discovery of gold. It’s not clear when he first came to the Santa Clara Valley, but the early 1870s found him in Southern California. According to a family story, he transported mail and about 1872, he and his partner were running a buckboard through the Cajon Pass where they ran afoul of some natives. The partner fled the scene, but R. H. was captured, and the Indians slit his throat. They left him for dead. Several hours later, the partner returned to the scene unharmed. He realized that despite having had his throat cut wide, Morey remained alive. The partner gathered up a burlap sack and a large needle used for sewing such sacks. Using the burlap material, he was able to crudely sew up the gaping neck wound, thereby saving Morey’s life.

Eventually, R. H. Morey and his second wife, Julia, settled first in Bardsdale and later farmed in the Sespe where they had two daughters, Maud and Myra. When R. H. died in 1922, his obituary said he was “a highly resident of this section, and numbered among the pioneers of California”. Julia lived with her daughter, Myra Morey Houtz in Monterey Park until her death.

After serving as an Army private in the Spanish American War, Norman went to work in the oil fields which were spreading throughout California. He worked both in the Los Angeles basin and in Kern County. Ada and Norman’s only child, Elbert “Al” Morey was born in 1902 on Central Avenue. By 1920 they were living on Saratoga Street. Norman spent a great deal of time away from home, especially in Kern County. It was there in 1932 that he suffered a sudden heart attack and died.

Ada lived until 1955, although her obituary was confined to her home for the last 25 years of her life and bedridden for the last 10. One thing we do know about Ada is that she did fine needlework. The Museum as several pillow tops she made. One unusual one was made of ‘Tobacco Silks”. They weren’t really silk, but were printed on satin. Coupons or “gift slips” that could be sent in for actual silks were available in packs of expensive brands of cigarettes or small cigars from about 1912 to 1915. Ada made very good use of them!

Al Morey followed his father into the oil industry, working at age 17 for Standard Oil. For more than 40 years, Al worked in the oil drilling industry, laying pipline all over our area. Like his uncles, Nate and Al Stone, Al was an avid hunter and fisherman in the Sespe. After his grandmother, Mahala Stone’s death, Al and his wife Beulah, nee Gregory, moved to the house on Mountain View.

Al passed away in 1983, the last of the local Stone/Morey line.

Al Morey’s legacy though continues. His avocation was trains. As a child, he and his father would ride the train to Los Angeles where they would fill locals’ grocery orders at Ralph’s market and deliver them upon their return. He was fascinated by the toy trains that would be in department store windows at Christmas time. Model trains became a hobby that he shared with others. Many who grew up in Fillmore in the 50s and 60s have told of visiting his home to see his trains. Boy and Cub Scout groups were regular visitors. You can see some of his trains on display in the Southern Pacific Depot at the Fillmore Historical Museum.