California Governor Edmund G Brown Jr. today declared a state of emergency to help control the state’s hepatitis A outbreak and increase the supply of adult hepatitis A vaccines to meet current needs.

“Vaccinating people at risk of exposure is the most effective tool we have to prevent the spread of hepatitis A infection during an outbreak,” said California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith.

To help combat the outbreak, CDPH has already distributed nearly 80,000 doses of the vaccine that were obtained through the federal vaccine program, but those supplies must be increased to continue to address the outbreak. Today’s declaration allows CDPH to immediately purchase additional vaccines directly from manufacturers and coordinate distribution to people at greatest risk in affected areas.

The adult hepatitis A vaccine is different than the one given to children, of which there is ample supply.

The risk of hepatitis A infection is associated with poor sanitation and hygiene and is transmitted through ingestion of contaminated food and drink or through direct contact with an infectious person. The current outbreak has largely impacted people experiencing homelessness and some illicit drug users. The virus can live for months in a contaminated environment, particularly in the absence of good sanitation.

To control this outbreak and prevent further spread, CDPH recommends the vaccination of people in affected areas who are homeless or using illicit drugs. CDPH also recommends vaccination of people who have frequent, close contact with at-risk populations in affected areas. CDPH is working with impacted counties to monitor the outbreak and implement vaccination efforts and is also providing guidance on improving sanitation, including access to handwashing facilities and toilets, to lessen the spread of the virus.

“Local public health officials are working hard to offer vaccines to people who are at the most at risk of infection, including homeless Californians,” said Dr. Smith. “Today’s order will help ensure communities can continue to deliver the vaccines where they are needed most.”

Hepatitis A infection typically causes fever, a general ill feeling with lack of appetite and nausea, and, later in the course of the infection, yellowness of the skin and eyes. Severe hepatitis A infection is rare but does occur in people with underlying liver disease and can cause the liver to fail, potentially leading to death.

For more information about hepatitis A, review our frequently asked questions and visit CDPH’s website. www.cdph.ca.gov

 


 
American Red Cross of Ventura County
American Red Cross of Ventura County

During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the American Red Cross encourages eligible donors to give blood to support cancer patients and others.

Mary Alice Donofrio gave blood for the first time in memory of her mother who received several blood transfusions while being treated for breast cancer. “I had no idea what to expect, but the experience was very easy and quite rewarding. Ever since then, I try and give blood as often as I can, and every time it gives me a good feeling in my heart. It is so nice to know that taking just an hour or so out of my day can help save the lives of others.”

According to the American Cancer Society, nearly 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected in the U.S. this year. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, with nearly 253,000 women expected to be diagnosed in 2017. Cancer patients may need blood products during chemotherapy, surgery or treatment for complications.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Oct. 16-31
Ventura

Oak Park
10/25/2017: 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Oak Park High School, 899 North Kanan Road
10/26/2017: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Oak Hills Elementary, 1010 Kanan Rd

Oxnard
10/24/2017: 2 p.m. - 8 p.m., Oxnard College, 4000 S Rose Ave
10/24/2017: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m., Oxnard College, 4000 S Rose Ave

Simi Valley
10/21/2017: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Rancho Santa Suzanna Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave
10/26/2017: 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Simi Valley High School, 5400 Cochran Street
10/27/2017: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Simi Valley Rancho Santa Suzanna Community, 5005 E Los Angeles Ave

Thousand Oaks
10/18/2017: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Thousand Oaks Inn, 75 W Thousand Oaks Blvd
10/23/2017: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m., Thousand Oaks Inn, 75 W Thousand Oaks Blvd
10/25/2017: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m., Thousand Oaks Inn, 75 W Thousand Oaks Blvd
10/27/2017: 7:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Thousand Oaks High School, 2323 N Moorpark Rd

Ventura
10/17/2017: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Knights of Columbus, 36 S. Figueroa St.
10/31/2017: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Knights of Columbus, 36 S. Figueroa St.

How to donate blood
Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Blood and platelet donors can save time at their next donation by using RapidPass® to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, from a computer or mobile device. To get started and learn more, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 


 
Friday, 8:32pm Fillmore Fire along with Santa Paula, Ventura County and City of Ventura Fire Departments, and Santa Paula Police Department, responded to an accident near the 18100 block of East Telegraph Road. When crews arrived on scene one person was trapped inside the vehicle which crashed into a vacant house. They were able to rescue the patient and transported her to a local hospital. Courtesy Fillmore Fire Department.
Friday, 8:32pm Fillmore Fire along with Santa Paula, Ventura County and City of Ventura Fire Departments, and Santa Paula Police Department, responded to an accident near the 18100 block of East Telegraph Road. When crews arrived on scene one person was trapped inside the vehicle which crashed into a vacant house. They were able to rescue the patient and transported her to a local hospital. Courtesy Fillmore Fire Department.
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City of Fillmore
City of Fillmore

At the council's regular Tuesday meeting, Cliff Knight (State Dept. of Conservation) gave a presentation explaining the extent of present oil extraction (by so-called "fracking") immediately north of Fillmore. The Seneca oil company is seeking an exemption from the 1973 Sespe aquifer protection law. Knight showed numerous projections of oil extraction locations north of the city, areas within one mile of Fillmore's deep aquifer.

No questions would be taken at the meeting. Instead, a meeting in Ventura, October 24, at 5 p.m. was announced. Knight assured the council that all questions would be answered at that time.

The presentation amounted to a complicated series of geological maps and graphic renderings of the zones presently fracking for oil, and the area into which Seneca seeks to extend its operations.

Four residents spoke out against this drilling extention, citing the fact that the entire area is undercut by a an earthquake fault which allegedly threatens the risk of a 7.8 quake. Concerns were raised about the possibility of a catastrophic breach of the Sespe aquifer basin which could destroy Fillmore's fresh water supply. The proposal was said to meet state and federal guidelines.

One concerned resident who spoke against the proposed Seneca fracking extention, referenced a video on the subject of fracking entitled "Blue Gold". Concerned residents are encouraged to attend the meeting in Ventura on October 24.

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The adoption of Ordinance 877 permitting a zoning change to permit structures to be 40 feet in height, or 3 stories, in the residential high density zone was approved unanimously.

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Following discussion, the council also unanimously agreed to take steps to remove the one-third retail requirement in the Central Avenue business district, to improve tourist traffic on that main commercial area.

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It was unanimously agreed that Rotorcraft, a new business to Fillmore, could purchase recycled water from the city at a reduced rate of $2.93 per unit (approximately 700 gals.) for a period of two years. Rotorcraft will begin construction of its plant in the Business Park this month. Considerable weight was given to the fact that this new business will also bring 85 new jobs to the city. Encouraging new companies in the Business Park was noted as the number one goal for the city.

 


 
Fillmore’s USA Gasoline is no more, within a blink of an eye USA Gasoline changed to Arco gas station.
Fillmore’s USA Gasoline is no more, within a blink of an eye USA Gasoline changed to Arco gas station.
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Monday, 10:40am city crews responded to reports of tree down on Cook Drive and Sespe Avenue due to the gusty winds this past week.
Monday, 10:40am city crews responded to reports of tree down on Cook Drive and Sespe Avenue due to the gusty winds this past week.
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Over the weekend Fillmore Fire crews along with Ventura County Fire responded to a traffic collision on Highway 126 and Hopper Canyon Road. Cause of the accident is still under investigation. Photo Courtesy Fillmore Fire Department.
Over the weekend Fillmore Fire crews along with Ventura County Fire responded to a traffic collision on Highway 126 and Hopper Canyon Road. Cause of the accident is still under investigation. Photo Courtesy Fillmore Fire Department.
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Pictured (l-r) standing is Marianne Crane and Lynn Edmonds, then new members Christina Villasenore, Sue Zeider and Janey Munoz, followed by Cathy Krushell and Jane David. Sitting in the front is new member Ellen Dewey. Welcome ladies! Submitted by Jane Daivd.
Pictured (l-r) standing is Marianne Crane and Lynn Edmonds, then new members Christina Villasenore, Sue Zeider and Janey Munoz, followed by Cathy Krushell and Jane David. Sitting in the front is new member Ellen Dewey. Welcome ladies! Submitted by Jane Daivd.
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Submitted by Brian Wilson.

The Fillmore Lions Club, chartered on August 15, 1927, recently celebrated their 90th anniversary.

Members of the Fillmore Lions Club are very visible in the community. Some of the most visible events include the Highway 126 Cleanup, Annual November Enchilada Dinner, Christmas Parade, Fourth of July Fireworks Booth and the May Festival Bingo Booth.

Lions is an International organization of about 1.35 million men and women in 207 countries. In 1925 Helen Keller challenged Lions to become "knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness," the Lions accepted. Today, sight programs remain one of Lions defining causes. For nearly 100 years, Lions Club members Internationally have worked on projects designed to prevent blindness, restore eyesight and improve eye health and eye care for hundreds of millions of people worldwide.

The Fillmore Lions Club is involved in many international and local community service projects. They include; Scholarships for local Fillmore High School Seniors, the Scout Foundation to help maintain the Fillmore Scout House, where the Fillmore Lions also meet on the 1st and 3rd Monday of each month at 7:00 PM, financial assistance to local Fillmore residents and students in need of examinations and if needed eye glasses, Peace Poster Contest for Middle School, students to enter a poster in the District 4-A3 Lions Annual Peace Poster Contest, and the Lions Student Speaker Contest, sponsoring a local Fillmore High School student to enter the District 4-A3.

Monies raised by the Fillmore Lions Club through projects such as their Fourth of July Fireworks sales are designated annually to many other organizations within Fillmore: The Fillmore Art Show, Big Brothers and Big Sisters, Boys and Girls Club, Boy Scout House Foundation, Grad Nite Live, Fillmore Pageant, Friends of the Library, Santa Clara Valley Hospice, Fillmore Little League, AYSO, Relay for Life, Fillmore High School athletics, Fillmore Historical Society, and Koats for Kids.

 
Photo of the Week "Brush Creek falls, north of Kernville" by Bob Crum. Photo data: ISO 320, Canon EF-S 15-85 lens @63mm, f/11, 1/80 second.
Photo of the Week "Brush Creek falls, north of Kernville" by Bob Crum. Photo data: ISO 320, Canon EF-S 15-85 lens @63mm, f/11, 1/80 second.
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Overwhelmed!
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

Last week I asked y'all about your preferences, desires and expectations. Get more technical or stay the course i.e. relate photography experiences while imparting tech details.

Hundreds responded. Awesome! Thanks!

Only a few stated they prefer more technical info. Focus stacking... HDR... timelapse etc. However, presenting tech info without illustrations is challenging in a column. But I'll try when logically feasible.

Some unmentionables boldly requested that I reveal my mermaid boudoir photography secrets. If you're one of them, best that you don't hold your breath.

The majority voted for more of the same. I can do that!

Recall last week. I discussed techniques for photographing vibrant fall foliage. To refresh, a polarizing filter reduces – if not eliminates - glare. It also helps to capture the richness of the colors.

Time of day to shoot is important. Richly colored leaves are photographed at their best at dawn. Awakening before the rooster crows is often necessary in order to get to a predetermined location at sunrise for that oh-so rewarding photo. Golden hour at sundown also a great time.

Location is also important. But how does one determine the best location in relation to the sunrise and at the prime time? Hark! I have the answer: The Photographer's Ephemeris.

The Photographer's Ephemeris (TPE) helps plan outdoor photography shoots in natural light. It’s a map-centric sun and moon calculator: see how the light will fall on the land, day or night, for any location on earth.

Created for photographers by a photographer in 2009, TPE is a software tool available for desktop and mobile devices to help you plan outdoor photography shoots to ensure the best possible natural light. You'll find it here: http://photoephemeris.com/.

The Ephemeris is not without a little learning curve but easily learned with a modicum of determination... i.e... you can do it.

I have used the Ephemeris often. For example, to photograph a Brush Creek waterfall north of Kernville. (See photo of the Week) Early morning puts the waterfall in shadow because the sun rises behind it. High noon not the best time. So what is? I can enter the GPS location of the falls into the Ephermeris – or locate it on the Ephermeris map – and follow the arc of the sun throughout the day. Alas, I will discover that I have a 45 minute window as the sun sets in the west but before it dips below the mountains. You see, now I know just how much time I have for a lunch break and a nap and be on scene at exactly the best time. Love it!

The TPE can be used for any scene at any GPS location. Most times I do pre-planning at home with Google Earth and TPE. But I also have TPE on my LG V3 cellphone just in case I discover a great new location along the way. Download TPE and learn it. It's very useful.

When you head for the hills, expect to move around. A compelling image consists of great composition. Don't just take a snapshot (gasp!) and leave. Move around with a creative eye looking for a different perspective. Sometimes moving only a few feet nails a better composition. When I arrive upon a scene, I'll take a moment to scan it and soak it all in before lifting the camera. This provides an opportunity to determine how to best capture the rapture. I'll take several photos from various spots... at least as many as the terrain permits without falling off a cliff... striving to capture the most compelling photograph. Accept the challenge. Go! Enjoy!

Happy photoing!

Send your comments, questions or suggestions to bob@fillmoregazette.com