At approximately 1:00 p.m. Tuesday, an eighteen-wheel tractor-trailer (identified belonging to JSA Soil) carrying a load of sawdust, drove into the rear of another tractor-trailer on Hwy.126 across from Taco Bell. Substantial damage was done to both parties.
At approximately 1:00 p.m. Tuesday, an eighteen-wheel tractor-trailer (identified belonging to JSA Soil) carrying a load of sawdust, drove into the rear of another tractor-trailer on Hwy.126 across from Taco Bell. Substantial damage was done to both parties.
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FUTA Vice President Delivers Statement
2016 Ventura County Fair Fillmore FFA Participants were also recognized for their participation at this past years Ventura County Fair. Photo by Bob Crum.
2016 Ventura County Fair Fillmore FFA Participants were also recognized for their participation at this past years Ventura County Fair. Photo by Bob Crum.
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At Tuesday night’s School Board meeting, Fillmore Unified recognized Rio Vista’s District Staff as heros for taking action during a flood that occurred at Rio Vista Elementary School. Photo by Bob Crum.
At Tuesday night’s School Board meeting, Fillmore Unified recognized Rio Vista’s District Staff as heros for taking action during a flood that occurred at Rio Vista Elementary School. Photo by Bob Crum.
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Brian Ricards. Photo by Bob Crum.
Brian Ricards. Photo by Bob Crum.
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Brian Ricards Statemant:

In the field of education the phrase ‘It’s all for the students’ is often thrown around. It sounds good to the ear and it looks good on paper as well. However when the educators of Fillmore High School step into our classrooms, we often ask ourselves “Is it REALLY all for the students?” And if it is “all for the students,” how do these current conditions of our classrooms benefit the education of these students?

Currently there are 4 teachers at the high school who have class sizes that exceed the 34 student average per class for a total of over 170 students in 5 periods. Our contract states that these teachers will receive $250 for each student, each semester for classrooms that exceed the 170 mark. However, this does not address the daily overcrowding in the classroom which takes away from student learning. In addition to overcrowded classrooms, the lack of resources available to teachers who conduct laboratory activities and projects for over 170 students often leads to costs that far outweigh our compensation. We often have to pay for supplies out of pocket for class activities because our departments have no money to spend on anything that cannot be purchased at Office Depot. For example: having an AP Biology class with 38 students can be extremely costly and time consuming for the teacher to ensure that the students are getting an AP quality education. Also, there are currently 9 periods of classroom instruction at the high school that have student numbers that exceed the 37 students per period cap allowed by our contract. This is a blatant contract violation with no compensation given to the affected teachers. A computer lab with 30 functioning computers becomes much less effective when there are 39 students enrolled in the class. On top of these contract violations, 5 teachers have class size discrepancies of 10 or more students between periods of the same class; another blatant contract violation. When educators such as ourselves live through these conditions every day in the classroom we know that these conditions severely impede the learning of our students. How can having 39 students in a single class be “all for the students?” FUTA has met with the administration at the high school and they have informed us that “This is the best that we can do”.

So I guess the real question we have for the school board and the administration is when will the educational rhetoric match up with the everyday conditions of our classrooms? Because right now there is a huge discrepancy between what is being said in public and what is going on daily in our classrooms. These conditions have existed for many years at the high school with staff members being scared to speak up for fear of retaliation from administrators. Those days are over. So when we see a violation of our teaching contract, especially a violation as important as class size, we will be forced to file a grievance in order to protect our members and most importantly to protect our students if these contract violations are not remedied as soon as possible.

It’s time to back up the educational rhetoric with educational action. Please assist the teachers of Fillmore High School in allowing us to teach in classrooms which create positive learning environments that students need and deserve in order to become productive contributors to our society.

Thank you for your time.
Brian Ricards - Vice President of FUTA

 


 
20-year-old Isaac Gonzalez of Fillmore was killed in a three-vehicle crash on Hwy. 126. Photo by Sebastian Ramirez.
20-year-old Isaac Gonzalez of Fillmore was killed in a three-vehicle crash on Hwy. 126. Photo by Sebastian Ramirez.
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The Ventura County Medical Examiner's Office has identified the victim of last week's crash on Highway 126 as 20-year-old Isaac Gonzalez, of Fillmore.

Gonzalez died as the result of a 3-car collision that occurred at approximately 4:00 a.m. Friday, west of Fillmore. His vehicle was headed eastbound when he suddenly veered into the westbound lane and collided with the rear of a westbound pickup, according to the CHP.

The CHP said Gonzalez' vehicle then headed towards the north shoulder of the roadway, causing a broadside collision with a second westbound vehicle. He was taken to the Ventura County Medical Center where he was pronounced dead.

The driver of the pickup, his female passenger, and the driver of the second vehicle suffered minor injuries and were treated at the scene. All three vehicles received major damage.

 


 
Joey Herrera
Joey Herrera
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Joey Herrera received his award at Elkins Ranch this past weekend.
Joey Herrera received his award at Elkins Ranch this past weekend.

Local Junior Golfer Joey Herrera recently earned 2015/2016 Ventura County Junior Golfer of the Year Honors. The award was presented at the annual awards barbeque during the first golf tournament for the 2016/2017 VCJGA event calendar. Fittingly this event was at Elkins Ranch Gold Course last weekend. Elkins Ranch has been Joey’s home away from home for the last few years. In a recent Fillmore Gazette article Joey said “My first aspiration is to play golf at USC. This was something I wasn’t sure was possible a couple years ago, but I know now that I can get there if I keep working”. If Joey is unable to get a chance at USC, his next goal would be to play Division 1 golf somewhere in the Western United States.

Joey had 10 top 10 finishes during the 2015/2016 campaign, including 4 wins, a second and a fourth place finish. His low tournament score of the year was the Play it Again Sports Tournament at Olivas Park Golf Links where he shot 68-68 for an 8 under par total of 136. Joeys low round for the year was 65 and had an tournament scoring average of 73.2 Joey would once again like to thank the Elkins Ranch Golf Course and staff, especially Joel Pyron and Colby Hartje. He would also like to thank Tierra Rejada Golf Course and their TRAP program and Saticoy Country Club. Last but certainly not least he would like to thank VCJGA’s Mark Wipf for providing him a platform to play in a competitive environment.

 


 
Ventura County Sheriff's Department
Ventura County Sheriff's Department

On Saturday September 17, 2016, at approximately 9:40 PM, a family member contacted the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office and reported her mother was overdue from a day hike in the area of Sisar canyon. Patrol resources located the hiker’s vehicle on Sisar Road at the trailhead. The Sheriff’s Aviation unit conducted an aerial search of the area using night vision goggles with negative results. The Upper Ojai and Fillmore Search and Rescue teams were activated and conducted a ground search.

On Sunday, September 18, 2016, at approximately 1:00 PM, the lost hiker was located by two people who were hunting in the area. One of the hunters was able to contact Sheriff’s dispatch and report the lost hiker’s location. The Sheriff’s Aviation unit conducted a hoist operation and transported the hiker to a landing zone where she was released to her family. After speaking with hiker, it was determined she made a wrong turn and became lost. The hiker had minor cuts and scratches but was in good spirits.

The hiker is to be commended for contacting a friend prior to hiking about her planned route and return time. This information assisted patrol resources in quickly locating the hiker’s vehicle and establishing a starting point for the search.

The Ventura County Sheriff’s Office would like to remind anyone enjoying the back county to be prepared for even the easiest of hikes. The “Ten Essentials” to take when hiking are Map, GPS, Sunglasses and Sunscreen, Extra Clothing, Flashlight, First-Aid Supplies, Fire Starter, Matches, Knife, and Extra Food and Water. Also file a hiking plan with someone who will be able to contact rescue resources in the event you do not return at your planned time. A hiking plan can be found at www.ojaisar.org

 


 
Two vehicles collided on Highway 126 in front of Carl's Jr. Minor injuries were reported.
Two vehicles collided on Highway 126 in front of Carl's Jr. Minor injuries were reported.
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The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) today announced its Genetic Disease Screening Program (GDSP) will now screen babies for adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurological disease found in about 1 in 20,000 newborn boys.

“This new screening program will save children’s lives,” said CDPH Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith. “Early diagnosis and treatment can halt the progression of the life-threatening form of the disease, which will have a profound impact on California families.”

Screening for adrenoleukodystrophy (pronounced ah-DREE-no-luke-oh-dis-trow-fee) will begin statewide today. CDPH will retroactively screen newborn blood samples that were received by the laboratory on or after February 16 of this year. The Department estimates that up to 100 California babies each year will be referred for follow-up services based on screening results. With early identification, the disease can be monitored before complications develop and appropriate treatment options can be made available to prevent serious and permanent health problems.

Some boys with ALD will develop a progressive, life-threatening form of the disease and can die without medical intervention within a short time after complications are recognized. ALD also causes adrenal gland dysfunction, which is characterized by weight loss, muscle weakness, fatigue, and life-threatening complications. ALD complications typically do not appear until after age 3.

In 2014, Governor Jerry Brown signed Assembly Bill (AB) 1559, which mandated that CDPH add ALD to the state’s newborn screening panel once the disorder was added to the national guidelines for state newborn screening programs. ALD was added to the national guidelines in February 2016.

"For children born with ALD, the difference between an early diagnosis through infant screening and a late diagnosis when symptoms start showing up, could be life and death,” said Dr. Richard Pan, a pediatrician and Senator representing the Sacramento region who authored AB 1559 in 2014. “I applaud CDPH on the launch of their screening program created through AB 1559 and I am thrilled that California children will suffer less and live longer as a result.”

Newborn screening is a public health service provided to all babies in California in order to identify many serious diseases. If not found and treated early, many of the diseases can cause serious and permanent health problems, developmental delay and even death. Since newborn screening began in 1966, more than 14,000 California babies have been found with various diseases and treated.

www.cdph.ca.gov

 


 

The American Red Cross urges eligible donors to give blood and platelets this fall to help restock the shelves following a significant summer shortage to ensure an adequate blood supply for patients in need.

Through the first two weeks of September, the Red Cross is down more than 10,000 donations from what is needed to replenish the blood supply and be prepared for emergencies large and small. Declines in donations can lead to blood shortages and make it difficult to meet patient needs should a disaster or emergency occur.

“September is National Preparedness Month and we urge eligible donors to make an appointment now to give blood or platelets,” said Nick Gehrig, communications director, Red Cross Blood Services. “Whether blood is needed for a chronic condition like sickle cell disease, a routine surgery, a traumatic accident or a large-scale disaster, it’s the blood already on the shelves that helps save lives. Red Cross blood and platelet donors play an important role in helping communities be prepared for all kinds of emergencies.”

Donors of all blood types are needed as blood products continue to be distributed to hospitals almost as quickly as donations come in. To make an appointment to give blood, download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Donors are encouraged to make appointments and complete the RapidPass online health history questionnaire at redcrossblood.org/rapidpass to help reduce wait times.

Upcoming blood donation opportunities: Ventura County

Camarillo
9/30/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., St Mary Magdalen Church, 25 N Las Posas Rd

Oxnard
10/5/2016: 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Oxnard High School, 3400 W Gonzales Rd

Simi Valley
9/23/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Rancho Santa Suzanna Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave
9/30/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Rancho Santa Suzanna Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave
10/14/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Rancho Santa Suzanna Community Center, 5005-C Los Angeles Ave
10/15/2016: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Simi Valley Rancho Santa Suzanna Community, 5005 E Los Angeles Ave

Thousand Oaks
9/26/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Thousand Oaks Inn, 75 W Thousand Oaks Blvd
10/3/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Thousand Oaks Inn, 75 W Thousand Oaks Blvd
10/7/2016: 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Sage Publication, 2455 Teller Road
10/12/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., Thousand Oaks Inn, 75 W Thousand Oaks Blvd

Ventura
9/27/2016: 1 p.m. - 7 p.m., EP Foster Library, 651 E Main Street
9/29/2016: 8:15 a.m. - 2:15 p.m., Ventura High School, 2 North Catalina

How to donate blood
Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in some states), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

Blood donors can now save time at their next donation by using RapidPass to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, prior to arriving at the blood drive. To get started and learn more, visit redcrossblood.org/RapidPass and follow the instructions on the site.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 


 
Photo by Bob Crum
Fillmore Fire Department held a Memorial for the 15th Anniversary of 911 this past Sunday at 6:30am by flying an American flag attached to the top of the ladder and served refreshments to the community. Photo by Bob Crum.
Fillmore Fire Department held a Memorial for the 15th Anniversary of 911 this past Sunday at 6:30am by flying an American flag attached to the top of the ladder and served refreshments to the community. Photo by Bob Crum.
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Fillmore City Council
Fillmore City Council
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The Fillmore City Council approved the construction and operation of a helicopter maintenance and repair business at Tuesday's meeting.

The applicant, Rotorcraft Support, Inc., submitted an application to develop a private heliport for a maintenance and repair facility for helicopters t be located within the Business Park Master Plan area on property owned by an affiliate of the Applicant. Two companies are proposed to locate at the site: Rotorcraft and The Guardian.

Rotocraft is a maintenance and repair helicopter business with 58 full time employees that will relocate from Van Nuys to Fillmore. The Guardian is a fire helicopter company that is contracted to fight forest fires and has approximately 15 full time employees. The Guardian helicopters will be at fire sites 9 months out of the year. When not attending to fires, the Guardian employees will be in Fillmore training. Both of these businesses would move to the property in Phase 1.

The project is to be constructed in two (2) phases. Phase 1 involves the construction a 67,872 SF hangar, parking spaces, retaining walls, public improvements on River St. and constructing the full width of the D St. extension (from River Street to 460 feet south of River Street). Phase 2 consists of constructing a 45,066 SF hangar for the future undetermined tenant.
The businesses would like to be allowed to operate from 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 7:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays with allowance to perform work on Sundays during times of emergencies.

The project site is 10.52 acres and can accommodate one landing pad with eight (8) helicopter parking areas.

The flight paths will occur along the Santa Clara River with the helicopters approaching the site from a southerly direction. The flight paths will not be over the residential areas of Fillmore. Prior to flying helicopters from the property the applicant is required to obtain approvals from the FAA, Caltrans (the Division of Aeronautics (DOA) and The Airport Land Commission.

The project site is located at the southwest corner of River St. and D St.

To avoid the appearance of large hangars, the applicant selected to locate the building along D St. rather than Rover St. In this way the project complies with the Business Park Master Plan SP-1 as it will not include long monotonous buildings.

The project is providing a 10' concrete bike path on the south side of River St. in compliance with the Business Park Master Plan's requirement for bike paths. This bike path section represents another important part of the future bike path as a link to Two Rivers Park, Santa Clara River Bike Path. This section of the path helps to bridge the connection of the Sespe Creek Bike Path to the Santa Clara River Bike Path.

A noise Study was conducted which determined that the sounds anticipated to be generated by the project are at an acceptable level per the City Zoning Ordinance. Additionally, the Planning Commission recommended that a noise monitor be placed close to the helipad.

Two Rivers Park will be protected by a buffer zone with employees and customer parking along D ST. Also, the flight path is not over the park. Additionally the project includes the construction of a portion of the bike path along River St. which will greatly enhance recreational activity in the community.