A vigil for George Floyd was held on June 5th at 7pm in front of the Fillmore Police Station. Participants brought flowers and candles, and held signs expressing different sentiments. A few people took turns speaking about racism and Mr. Floyd’s life. Fillmore City Council Member Manuel Minjares stopped by to speak to the protestors as well.
A vigil for George Floyd was held on June 5th at 7pm in front of the Fillmore Police Station. Participants brought flowers and candles, and held signs expressing different sentiments. A few people took turns speaking about racism and Mr. Floyd’s life. Fillmore City Council Member Manuel Minjares stopped by to speak to the protestors as well.
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On Tuesday evening, June 9th, Fillmore Sheriffs, K9, Copter 9 and Ventura County Station 27 were called out on a shooting west of Fillmore at Atmore Road and Hwy 126. One man was found with a gunshot wound and transported to an area hospital in stable condition. The search for the suspect continued into Wednesday.
On Tuesday evening, June 9th, Fillmore Sheriffs, K9, Copter 9 and Ventura County Station 27 were called out on a shooting west of Fillmore at Atmore Road and Hwy 126. One man was found with a gunshot wound and transported to an area hospital in stable condition. The search for the suspect continued into Wednesday.
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Police Search for Suspect Near Fillmore

On Tuesday, June 9th law enforcement came out in full force with helicopter, K-9 and SWAT. Officers responded to reports of a shooting at 6:30pm on West Telegraph Road (SR126) near Atmore Road. Deputies found one man injured; he was transported to an area hospital. According to reports the shooter was travelling south bound on Telegraph near the agricultural fields. Helicopters were then called in to search the surrounding Fillmore area for the suspect at 7:40pm. The suspect is assumed to be armed and as of Wednesday afternoon still at large.

 


 
On June 4th Fillmore High held a Graduation Procession to celebrate the accomplishments of the Class of 2020. Approximately 230 graduates drove in vehicles with their families into a decorated school parking lot complete with buses, a stage, flowers, and an American flag displayed on top of a Fillmore fire truck. Each graduate walked across the graduation stage and posed for their graduation photo with diploma in hand while their families cheered. A video of the entire Graduation Procession can be found on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIROP_M2-s8
On June 4th Fillmore High held a Graduation Procession to celebrate the accomplishments of the Class of 2020. Approximately 230 graduates drove in vehicles with their families into a decorated school parking lot complete with buses, a stage, flowers, and an American flag displayed on top of a Fillmore fire truck. Each graduate walked across the graduation stage and posed for their graduation photo with diploma in hand while their families cheered. A video of the entire Graduation Procession can be found on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIROP_M2-s8
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Joe Dye, circa 1870. Photos Courtesy Natural Historical Museum of Los Angeles.
Joe Dye, circa 1870. Photos Courtesy Natural Historical Museum of Los Angeles.
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Ventura Signal Volume V Number 24, 2 October 1875.
Ventura Signal Volume V Number 24, 2 October 1875.
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Thomas Robert Bard
Thomas Robert Bard
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Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum

If you have been reading the last few stories from the Fillmore Historical Museum, you will have noticed that names keep recurring. This article will be no different. This shouldn’t be surprising since in the 1870’s and early 1880’s there were only a few hundred people in the Sespe/Cienega area (Fillmore didn’t yet exist). They were neighbors and business partners. They might be friends one month and bitter enemies the next, usually because of water or mineral rights.

Most sources agree that it was Thomas Bard who brought in the first successful drilled well on Thomas Scott’s property in Ojai in 1867. He was sent to this area as a representative of Scott, acting Assistant Secretary of War under President Lincoln, and who was also president of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Mr. Scott had approximately 350,000 acres in California at that time. Bard would continue to act as Mr. Scott and/or Pennsylvania Railroad’s agent for many years. The Ventura County Signal, October 2, 1875, included an advertisement offering for sale the California Petroleum Company’s (owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad) interest in 7,080 acres of Rancho Ojai “on which there are two flowing oil wells, many natural springs of Petroleum and large deposits of Asphaltum.” The agent for the California Petroleum Company was T. R. Bard of Hueneme.

With the growing need for oil many people came to the area looking for petroleum. One of the folks it attracted was Joseph Franklin Dye. Joe Dye, born in 1831, was originally from Kentucky but had moved to Texas with his family (he was one of sixteen children) in the 1840s. He and two of his brothers went west to the California gold fields, but returned empty handed. He then headed to New Mexico and Arizona where he apparently worked as a miner and teamster.

Besides being a wanderer, Joe also soon became known for having a short temper and a hair trigger. In the early 1850s, he got into a dispute in New Mexico with ”Hand Saw” Pete Fantig (who apparently got the nickname because he killed a man by cutting him into pieces with a handsaw) over a card game. This ended with Joe shooting Hand Saw in the neck. Hand Saw survived to be later shot by a gambler in Salt Lake City. A Southern sympathizer, Dye has also been identified as one of the men who rode with the Confederate guerilla group in Southern California headed by John Mason and Jim Henry.

By the time Joe Dye came to the Santa Clara River Valley in the early 1870s, Dye had killed or wounded several men both while serving as a law officer in Los Angeles and while a private citizen. In October 1870 he shot and killed Los Angeles City Marshal William Warren over reward money, but was acquitted.

In the July 4, 1874, Ventura Signal, an announcement was published of the creation of the Piru Mining Company, a partnership made up of Joseph Dye, S. Levy and Charles Holmes all of Los Angeles. The mining partnership only lasted a couple of years, but Dye became familiar with the area north of the Santa Clara River. He filed claims in the Alamo Mountain and Little Sespe areas. By May, 1875, the same paper announced that “Somewhere in the Alamo mountains, Mr. Joe Dye has discovered a flow of fine petroleum, almost pure; so pure that it can be put into a lamp and burned, without refining.” Dye lost little time developing his claim, which brought him into conflict with anyone else filing claims in the same area.

By 1878, Dye was elected chairman of the Little Sespe Petroleum District which was to “bring order” to the claims in the area and oppose any take over by “tenderfeet from Los Angeles”. The District required that to keep a claim, the claimant had to spend at least $200 improving the property and it must have clearly established boundaries. In August, 1884, J. F. Dye, “incorporator of the district” and J. C. Udall “recorder of the district” wrote a letter in the Los Angeles Herald making it clear that the Sespe was not controlled by the Los Angeles capitalists, although they had leased 800 acres from one of the undersigned, undoubtedly Dye. Instead it is the members of the district who controlled the bulk of the resources.

About this time, Dye married and lived in the Sespe with his wife, Francesca (or in another account, Grace), and their daughter, Grace (according to one later newspaper account there was also a baby boy). Things seemed to be going well for Joe Dye. Including all of his mining claims, his net worth was thought to be at this time close to $200,000. He took on a partner, H. J. Crow of Glendale, and hired a local man, Herman Haines, formerly postmaster at Cienega, as help on his claim.

By the fall of 1886, however, Dye was in jail for the murder of Herman Haines. Dye had discovered that his young bride (she was at least 20 years younger than he) was romantically involved with his partner, H. J. Crow, and that Haines and his son acted as intermediaries between the two. Dye confronted his wife and sent her home to her parents. He then fired Haines telling him to keep away from him. Haines took to carrying a Henry rifle with him telling people it was for Joe Dye. For whatever reason, both men found themselves in Morris Cohn’s store/saloon in Santa Paula. Most accounts agree that Haines went for his rifle first but Dye was the better shot and shot longer. The wounded Haines ran out onto Main Street with Dye still shooting. Haines fell in the middle of the street, dying several days later. Dye gave himself up to authorities and was released on $10,000 bail. When he came to trial he was represented by Stephen M. White and Henry T. Gage, later Governor of California, both with known ties to the petroleum industry. Dye was initially convicted and sentenced to 16 years, but a new trial was granted and in November of 1888 he was acquitted, but only after spending fourteen months in jail. [To be continued]

 


 
On June 8th Fillmore celebrated Florine Data’s 103rd birthday in front of City Hall. Pictured above is Florine with some of the Fillmore Firefighters who came out to celebrate with her.
On June 8th Fillmore celebrated Florine Data’s 103rd birthday in front of City Hall. Pictured above is Florine with some of the Fillmore Firefighters who came out to celebrate with her.
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City of Fillmore Fire Department

Before You Sell
- Upon inspection and approval by the Fillmore Fire Chief or his designation officials, fireworks sales may commence beginning June 28" 12:00PM — July 5 12:00PM.
- Inspections will be conducted beginning June 27" by appointment only. To schedule an appointment please contact Fire Chief D. Keith Gurrola at (805) 558-0932.
Inspection Check List – Fire Safety/Egress
- 5 Gallon bucket with water at each point of egress.
- Charged water fire extinguisher at each point of egress, or no less than a 4 lb ABC.
- Clear and open walkway to all points of egress. Area should be kept clear of product and trash.
- DO NOT store cardboard boxes adjacent to the fireworks stand. They ignite easily.
- Dumpsters should be placed a minimum of 50 feet from the fireworks booth. If possible, lock the dumpster.
- All flammable weeds will need to be cleared a minimum of 100 feet from the booth and Storage.
- No parking within 15 feet of any booth.
Inspection Check List Signs
- No smoking signs posted in both English and Spanish on all sides of the booth.
- Minimum age to purchase signs posted on all sides of the booth.
- Post signs provided by Fire Department regarding illegal fireworks.
- Do not place signs within 12 feet of the highway unless you have an encroachment permit issued by Caltrans permitting you to do so.
- Signs will be disposed of with out question by Caltrans if encroaching the right-of-way.
- No flashing signs, strobe lights or any other colored light device shall be place around the booth.
COVID-19 Signs
COVID -19 Prevention (Operators)
- Fireworks sales organization will register with VC Reopens (Ventura County Reopens}
- Complete and implement a COVID Prevention Plan:
- Guidance for employers and employees
- Guidance for customers
- City will coordinate with each Fireworks sales operator in registering at VC Reopens
- Site inspections to ensure COVID Prevention Plan Implemented
- Standardized Plan for uniformity and effectiveness in each operation
- Flyers to be provided for posting on-site on registering
Inspection Check List Information Cards
- Please distribute one information flyer to each individual purchasing fireworks at your booth.
1,000 flyer will be provided to each booth.
- It is anticipated that booths will run out of flyer SO avoid wasteful situations due to the limited quantity.
Inspection Check List Electrical
- All electrical must be hardwired within the booth and enclosed in electrical conduit, unless otherwise approved by the Fire Chief.
- The use of extension cords within the booth is prohibited.
- Items requiring electricity should be plugged directly into a surge protector with out the use of an extension cord.
Inspection Check List On Site Storage
- All storage containers must display a 1.4G explosive placard on all sides of the storage container.
- Storage container doors should not open in the direction of the fireworks stand.
- Storage of fireworks off site is prohibited.
Inspection Check List On Site Security
- Campers for security only should be parked at minimum 50 feet from the fireworks booth.
- The entry/exit door of the camper should face away from the fireworks booth.
Inspection Check List Sales
- Minimum age to purchase fireworks is 16 years old. When in doubt of age, be sure to card! It is a misdemeanor to sell fireworks to a minor and will also result in the closing of your booth.
- Minimum age to sell fireworks is 18 years old.
- All COVID-19 precautions and protocols must in place and followed.
- Parents should NOT bring their children to the firework stands while working shifts, especially due to the current COVID-19 protocols.
- All individuals not working should also refrain from loitering outside the booth entrance.
- No other item may be sold at, near or around your booth. I.E. T-shirts, snow cones, etc.
- No sales gimmicks.
Inspection Check List Discharging Fireworks
- Fireworks may not be discharged within 150 ft of firework stands or storage.
- Used fireworks should be properly disposed of; no closer than 150 ft of fireworks stands or storage.
Operate a Tight Ship…
- Choose your help wisely.
- Be suspicious of strangers who volunteer to work at your booth.
- Obtain thumbprint on all checks accepted as well as drivers license information.
Fraud Detection
- Inspect all bills received to insure they are genuine U.S. Currency.
- Use counterfeit detector pens
- Currency bill scanners such as fraud fighter UV light
- When and if and doubt call. For emergency situations please call 911. For non-emergency incidents, please contact the Fillmore Police department at 909-524-2233. Do not risk your safety for fireworks.
Illegal Fireworks
- The only fireworks permitted for sale/possession/discharge in Fillmore are State Fire Marshall approved “Safe & Sane” fireworks.
- Safe and Sane Fireworks will always display the State Fire Marshall’s Seal directly on the firework or its packaging.
- If your vendor does not provider it, do not sell it.
- Those found in possession, discharging or selling non-approved fireworks will be cited and fined $1,000!
- Ventura County and Fillmore PD are capable of issuing citation for fireworks violations.
- If you see illegal activity occurring with fireworks regardless of the magnitude or severity contact fire officials immediately!
- Report activity to the Fireworks Tip line at (805) 524-1500 ext. 350 or call (805) 558-0932.
Be Safe & Good Luck.

 


 
Thank you to the Ventura County Credit Union for your awesome donation of $2,000 to the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley, stated CEO Jan Marholin. The funds will be used for summer programs. Pictured are Melissa Miller, Community Development Manager for VCCU, and Tina Estes, Vice President of Marketing for VCCU, and Jan Marholin, CEO. Photo courtesy Boys & Girls Club of SCV.
Thank you to the Ventura County Credit Union for your awesome donation of $2,000 to the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley, stated CEO Jan Marholin. The funds will be used for summer programs. Pictured are Melissa Miller, Community Development Manager for VCCU, and Tina Estes, Vice President of Marketing for VCCU, and Jan Marholin, CEO. Photo courtesy Boys & Girls Club of SCV.
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Photo of the Week: "Blue Dodge truck at the Bodie ghost town" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7DMKII camera, Av mode, with Canon EF-S 15-85mm lens with polarizer filter. Exposure; ISO 640, aperture f/11, 1/250sec shutter speed.
Photo of the Week: "Blue Dodge truck at the Bodie ghost town" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7DMKII camera, Av mode, with Canon EF-S 15-85mm lens with polarizer filter. Exposure; ISO 640, aperture f/11, 1/250sec shutter speed.
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You aim. You fire. You ZINK it!
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

We all know the delight of sniffing a new car's aroma, the cherished smell of plastic, leather, carpeting and rubber wafting in the air filling our giddy nostrils.

Why can't photographers enjoy the pleasure of sniffing a special aroma of a new camera? The last time I bought a new camera, I slowly opened the box, lifted the camera gently, removed the protective wrap surrounding the camera and what do I smell? A Chinese shipping port!

Speaking of cameras, Canon is back leading a charge featuring a different technology. The camera is Canon's new Ivy Cliq. The Cliq uses a technology called zink which is short for zero ink. It produces more traditional type prints but automatically and in 30 seconds. If you experienced Polaroid at some time in your life, you could relate to the Ivy Cliq.

Wired dot com wrote, "In keeping with the legacy of Polaroids, Canon's Cliq is not going to churn out museum-quality, crystal-clear prints. Still, it's undeniably fun to use and the results will likely be good enough for many people. If you're looking for an easy way to share those selfies or group portraits in the real world, the Cliq delivers.

It's super simple. There's no focusing, no worrying about exposure. You aim. You fire. You print. This is the perfect camera for phonetographers!

Back to wired: "You press the shutter button and 30 seconds later your image prints. It has no screen, no preview. There is a mirror next to the lens to help you frame selfies, but on the back there are just two buttons: one to choose your image dimensions (either 2 x 3 or 2 x 2 inches) and one to reprint the last image, which is handy when you're sharing photos with friends." (Two buttons!)

"The Ivy Cliq holds 10 Zink papers and the refill packs are small enough that you can throw a few in your pocket and you won't even notice them.

¬It does optionally store your images to a MicroSD card (64 GB max, like this one) so you can download and edit them using the desktop software of your choice. Just know that the Cliq has a 5-megapixel camera so they're not the kind of photos you can blow up bigger than 2 x 3 inches. If you bought your phone in the last few years, it likely captures better images than the Cliq.
There's one big gotcha: You can't take pictures without printing. The Cliq requires printing. But the whole point of the Cliq is to print and share in the moment.

The Cliq comes in red, blue, or yellow. It's slightly thicker than a deck of cards and small enough to squeeze into most pockets. It's a little tight in the pocket of your jeans, but considering that it's a printer inside a camera, it's remarkably compact.

There's also a Cliq+ model, which adds eight LED lights around the lens for better selfie lighting, shoots 8-megapixel images, and has built-in Bluetooth wireless support so you can print images you've taken with your phone, making it something of a hybrid camera/printer.

With a 5mp sensor, the Cliq won't produce stellar photos. Still, it's undeniably fun to use and the results will likely be good enough for many people. If you're looking for an easy way to share those selfies or group portraits, the Cliq delivers. As a bonus, Zink images are also stickers. Great for sticker lovers! And only $89.00 on Amazon! Ivy Cliq+ $129.00. The Cliq+ is a better value IMO."

Photo of the week is from the archives: Dodge blue truck at ghost town Bodie. Happy photoing.

Send comments, questions or suggestions to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 
On Thursday, May 28th Post Commander James Mills, Fillmore VFW Post #9637, awarded checks to two Fillmore High
School students, Erin Overton (left) and Natalie Parish (right). It is the First Annual Veterans of Foreign Wars Post
#9637 Scholarship. Photos courtesy Fillmore VFW Post #9637.
On Thursday, May 28th Post Commander James Mills, Fillmore VFW Post #9637, awarded checks to two Fillmore High School students, Erin Overton (left) and Natalie Parish (right). It is the First Annual Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #9637 Scholarship. Photos courtesy Fillmore VFW Post #9637.
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Erin Overton
Erin Overton
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Natalie Parish
Natalie Parish
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Courtesy Fillmore VFW Post #9637

The First Annual Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #9637 scholarships awarded to Fillmore High School Students, Erin Overton and Natalie Parish. We are Happy to share the future goals of Miss. Overton as she will be attending Santa Cruz University in the fall. Her plans for the future include a career in Children’s Book publishing, and guiding the future of our youth here in Fillmore.

Miss. Parish will be attending Moorpark Community College for the fall where she plans to earn a degree in agricultural communications. After her transfer to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo to continue her education so she may use her agricultural degree to assist farmers across America.

The Fillmore Veterans of Foreign Wars Post # 9637 Post Commander James Mills presented the checks May 28, 2020 to the recipients with the VFW’s warmest wishes for a bright new future.

 
A controlled burn will be executed in Fillmore on Thursday, June 4th from noon to 5pm. The Ventura County Fire Department is planning to do a live fire training near the Water Reclamation Plant on west River Street. A total of 2.8 acres has been approved for the burn by the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (CAL). Both CAL and Ventura County Fire will be participating. Residents should be aware that they may see smoke, flames or even helicopters and other equipment between Sespe Creek, the Santa Clara River, and Highway 126. Above is a photo of a live fire training that took place last year in Fillmore.
A controlled burn will be executed in Fillmore on Thursday, June 4th from noon to 5pm. The Ventura County Fire Department is planning to do a live fire training near the Water Reclamation Plant on west River Street. A total of 2.8 acres has been approved for the burn by the Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (CAL). Both CAL and Ventura County Fire will be participating. Residents should be aware that they may see smoke, flames or even helicopters and other equipment between Sespe Creek, the Santa Clara River, and Highway 126. Above is a photo of a live fire training that took place last year in Fillmore.
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