Live video stream of 2019 Fillmore High Graduation Ceremony begins tonight at approximately 7:00 p.m. local time.

Instructions for watching the graduation live stream:

Point your web browser to http://www.fillmoreusd.org/stream/

It will take you to a District webpage entitled "Video Streams Fillmore Video Production"

Under "Fillmore Video Production," click on “YouTube Channel”

Direct YouTube link is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Txj3EQcM63Y

 


 
On May 27 at 8:30 p.m., a solo vehicle crash ended with it driving into an embankment at Old Telegraph Road and Grand Avenue. The vehicle was found 100-feet off the road, with the driver trapped inside. She was extricated by 8:50 p.m., and taken to the Ventura County Medical Center. Her condition has not been released. Old Telegraph Road was closed in both directions between Grand Avenue and C Street. Photo courtesy Ventura County News Crew.
On May 27 at 8:30 p.m., a solo vehicle crash ended with it driving into an embankment at Old Telegraph Road and Grand Avenue. The vehicle was found 100-feet off the road, with the driver trapped inside. She was extricated by 8:50 p.m., and taken to the Ventura County Medical Center. Her condition has not been released. Old Telegraph Road was closed in both directions between Grand Avenue and C Street. Photo courtesy Ventura County News Crew.
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(l-r, top to bottom row) Jorge Acevedo (FHS Alumni Scholarship), Aalyiah Alfaro (FHS Alumni Scholarship), Mireya Avila Mejia (FHS Alumni Scholarship), Fatima Bazurto (Wm. Brisby Memorial Scholarship), Wendy Carrillo Garcia (FHS Alumni Scholarship), James Chandler (Steve & Patricia Baum Memorial Scholarship), Cecilia Cisneros (Scanlin Scholarship/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Sergio Contreras (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Daniel Cruz Enciso (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Abraham Santa Rosa (FHS Alumni Scholarship) (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Gabriel Gonzalez (Dr. Jack Crandall Scholarship), Katherine Johnson (Terry McGuire Memorial Scholarship), Erik Magana FHS Alumni Scholarship), Damian Meza (Susan Knight Scholarship), Ariana Schieferle (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship) (John Lemley Memorial Scholarship), Jerry  Tovar (Dr. Jack Crandall Scholarship), Matthew Van De Mheen (Susan Knight Scholarship), Alexis Van Why (John Lemley Memorial Scholarship), Antonio Villalobos (Scanlin/Balden Scholarship).
(l-r, top to bottom row) Jorge Acevedo (FHS Alumni Scholarship), Aalyiah Alfaro (FHS Alumni Scholarship), Mireya Avila Mejia (FHS Alumni Scholarship), Fatima Bazurto (Wm. Brisby Memorial Scholarship), Wendy Carrillo Garcia (FHS Alumni Scholarship), James Chandler (Steve & Patricia Baum Memorial Scholarship), Cecilia Cisneros (Scanlin Scholarship/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Sergio Contreras (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Daniel Cruz Enciso (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Abraham Santa Rosa (FHS Alumni Scholarship) (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship), Gabriel Gonzalez (Dr. Jack Crandall Scholarship), Katherine Johnson (Terry McGuire Memorial Scholarship), Erik Magana FHS Alumni Scholarship), Damian Meza (Susan Knight Scholarship), Ariana Schieferle (Scanlin/Balden Athletic Scholarship) (John Lemley Memorial Scholarship), Jerry Tovar (Dr. Jack Crandall Scholarship), Matthew Van De Mheen (Susan Knight Scholarship), Alexis Van Why (John Lemley Memorial Scholarship), Antonio Villalobos (Scanlin/Balden Scholarship).
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Tickets Still Available But Going Fast...

The 106th Annual Fillmore High Alumni Dinner event will take place at the Fillmore-Piru Veterans Memorial Building on Saturday, June 8th.

One of the highlights of the event is the awarding of scholarships to each Alumni Association’s scholar recipient.

Dinner is catered by the award winning DJ’s Catering. The menu includes grilled Angus sirloin beef, roasted chicken breast with wild mushrooms (in Porcini Béchamel) served with field greens and vegetable salad, potatoes Mousseline, three cheese macaroni & cheese, and an assortment of freshly baked rolls with butter. Dessert menu includes choice of warm peach or apple cobbler (with McConnell’s of Santa Barbara vanilla bean ice cream).

There is still room available but reservations are going fast. Purchase your reservations ASAP online at www.fillmorehighalumni.com (click on Events), At the FHS Alumni Store located at 559 Sespe Avenue, or Patterson Hardware located at 362 Central Avenue (open 7 days a week).

Let’s celebrate our alma mater, our community of Fillmore, and our graduating seniors!

 


 
FHS Mother Daughter Banquet 2019
On Thursday, May 23rd at the FHS Mother/Daughter Banquet, the senior class took the time to recognize and thank FUSD Secretary Barbara Lemons (holding flowers) for her years of service to the district. Barbara is retiring after 21 years. Photos courtesy Katrionna Furness.
On Thursday, May 23rd at the FHS Mother/Daughter Banquet, the senior class took the time to recognize and thank FUSD Secretary Barbara Lemons (holding flowers) for her years of service to the district. Barbara is retiring after 21 years. Photos courtesy Katrionna Furness.
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Fillmore High hosted their annual Mother Daughter Banquet for the 2019 Senior class at the Veterans Memorial Building. Mother’s and daughter’s gathered for a pot luck style dinner as well as entertainment by both the students and the moms.
Fillmore High hosted their annual Mother Daughter Banquet for the 2019 Senior class at the Veterans Memorial Building. Mother’s and daughter’s gathered for a pot luck style dinner as well as entertainment by both the students and the moms.
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A radar speed limit sign has been installed at the east end of S.R. 126 in the 200 block of Old Telegraph Road. The speed limit entering the city is 45mph, but quickly drops to 40 then 35mph. Radar signs are an effective and affordable tool to slow drivers down. The signs display the speed of approaching vehicles, making speeding drivers aware that they are exceeding the speed limit. Studies have shown radar signs produce 10-20% reductions in average roadway speeds, along with an increase in compliance with the posted speed limit.
A radar speed limit sign has been installed at the east end of S.R. 126 in the 200 block of Old Telegraph Road. The speed limit entering the city is 45mph, but quickly drops to 40 then 35mph. Radar signs are an effective and affordable tool to slow drivers down. The signs display the speed of approaching vehicles, making speeding drivers aware that they are exceeding the speed limit. Studies have shown radar signs produce 10-20% reductions in average roadway speeds, along with an increase in compliance with the posted speed limit.
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It’s FREE to camp out with us! However, you must pre-register with the Parks and Recreation Department still! Email us to get the registration paperwork at recreation@ci.fillmore.ca.us

Join us as Fillmore, CA partakes in the Great American Campout from June 22nd-23rd at Two Rivers Park! We'll have camp activities throughout the day, a campfire & an evening movie in the park.

This is a FREE event to participate in; we'll have food trucks available for you to purchase treats & meals from.

Bring your own tent, sleeping bags etc. all tents must be secured with weights or sandbags NO STAKES IN THE GROUND. All youth under 18 years old must be registered with an attending adult.

Join us for a family-friendly event to kick-off the summer in Fillmore!

Email recreation@ci.fillmore.ca.us to register!

 
FUSD retirees were recognized at the Board meeting, June 4th. Pictured are a few of this year’s retirees: l-r, Elizabeth Munoz, Joanne Fore, Barbara Lemons, Rosalia Lizarraga, and Joyce Stines. Not pictured Gilda Bricker, Raymond Garcia, Scott Olson, Isabel Ramirez, William Raymond, and James White.
FUSD retirees were recognized at the Board meeting, June 4th. Pictured are a few of this year’s retirees: l-r, Elizabeth Munoz, Joanne Fore, Barbara Lemons, Rosalia Lizarraga, and Joyce Stines. Not pictured Gilda Bricker, Raymond Garcia, Scott Olson, Isabel Ramirez, William Raymond, and James White.
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FUSD Board Meeting Highlights
Fillmore Unified School District
Fillmore Unified School District

Board meeting highlights for the Fillmore Unified School District

Fillmore Adult School 2018-2019 Year in Review
The Governing Board received a presentation on the 2018-2019 Fillmore Adult School Year in Review. Presentation was delivered by Assistant Superintendent, Stefan Cvijanovich and Director, Tom Chan

Proposed 2019-2020 Update to Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP)
The Governing Board received a presentation on the proposed update to the 2019-2020 LCAP. Presentation was delivered by Assistant Superintendent, Micheline G. Miglis.

2019-2020 Proposed Budget, Including Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) Budget Overview for Parents and Proposition 30 Expenditure Plan
The Governing Board received a presentation on the 2019-2020 proposed budget and accompanying components. Presentation was delivered by Assistant Superintendent, Andrea McNeill.

Award Bid for Electrical Yard Infrastructure Update at Fillmore High School
The Governing Board awarded the bid as follows:
Project#: 2019-035
Project Description: Electrical Yard Infrastructure Update at Fillmore High School
Contractor: Scott and Sons Electric
Amount: $1,606,000.00

Personnel Recommendations
The Board approved all personnel recommendations including new hires, promotions, resignations, and leaves.

 
Photo of the Week: "Capturing both feet of the runner in the air a matter of timing. No do-overs for such photos: by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7DMKII camera, manual mode, Tamron 16-300mm lens @151mm. Exposure; ISO 200, aperture f/11, 1/250th of a second shutter speed.
Photo of the Week: "Capturing both feet of the runner in the air a matter of timing. No do-overs for such photos: by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7DMKII camera, manual mode, Tamron 16-300mm lens @151mm. Exposure; ISO 200, aperture f/11, 1/250th of a second shutter speed.
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Boring photo bashed!
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

I won't deny feeling irritable — symptoms of cabin fever from long confinements indoors during weather unfit for even a duck. Don't understand the weather of late but I know that it's not conducive to photography: dismal light and damp environment.

To counter the symptoms, some well-meaning friends suggested that I start a new hobby (no time), try a new recipe (out of garlic), start scrapbooking (not enough scraps), do a puzzle (too puzzling), engage in late spring cleaning (to much like work), spend time reading the Gazette's entertainment section (the whole paper is entertaining ), or plan a summer vacation. That's it! On my bucket list: A cruise up the inland passage to Alaska. Anyway, by the time you read this, the weather will most likely turn delightful again. Moving along...

Ever harbor a thought about a particular subject and not ever needing to mention it until questioned? And, for vindication, wonder if anyone else thinks likewise?

A few years ago, I was asked to speak about my experiences as a photographer to a group of Thousand Oaks artists. I took several photos to show. One image, in particular, I made in August 2012, near Nicholas Pond, Leo Carrillo State Park. The photo: tall, wild, brown and dead grass backlit by the sun making the grass glow beautifully as if every stalk of grass was gold—a favorite photo. One in the audience asked: “Why take a boring photo of brown dead grass?” Nice guy! I paused, took a deep breath, and exhaled slowly. As I glanced around the room, I was thankful for the opportunity to express my passion for photography. Holding the photo, the scene, I explained, was beautiful, blissful in its unique way. After admiring the view a few moments, I made this photo. Look at how the grass glows! Within just a few minutes, the sun set behind the hill eliminating the majestic light. Please note that I made the photo for me! I explained that every time I look at the photo, I could vividly recall the awe and joy I felt at that moment! As I share this photo, I'm sharing a special moment in time and place. Your tastes, sir, may differ, and that's OK. The group applauded, and I continued with my presentation, knowing that the group of artists understood.

When not shooting on assignment, was I the only one who took photos for myself? No. William Neill, a photographer/writer for Outdoor Photographer magazine, recently wrote that a friend asked him: “‘Is my voice original at all, and does it matter?' Neill replied: “That depends on why you're doing your photography and for whom. I like to think that most of us make photographs for ourselves, for the enjoyment of experiencing nature and exploring the landscape, and not to please someone else.”

Vindication! Furthermore, with camera in hand, I've explored, enjoyed and photographed fabulous landscapes and waterscapes in places that I might not usually have even thought about. Montaña de Oro State Park comes to mind. Anyone else been there?

Did I ever mention timing? Making a zesty photo zing is a matter of critical timing. The photo of the week is an example of why the finger on the shutter-release button better be ready! Milliseconds matter. There are no do-overs. Get it or go home empty handed! Note that I'd be hard-pressed to make the photo with, ahem, a cellphone. C’mon folks, you know I had to say that! Happy photoing.

Send suggestions, questions or comments to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 

FILLMORE, California – People across the world can get up-close-and-personal with an endangered California condor chick in real-time through live streaming video of a cliff-side nest in a canyon on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County, California.

California condor chick #980 hatched on April 10. Its parents are nine-year-old female condor #563 and 19-year-old male condor #262. This is the pair’s first nesting attempt together and their first year on the live streaming Condor Cam as a pair. This is female condor #563’s second attempt at raising a chick, and the chick’s father, condor #262, fledged one other chick in the past with a previous mate.

Followers of the California Condor Cam watched a chick hatch live in the wild for the first time in history from another cliff-side nest on Hopper Mountain NWR in 2015. Since then, livestreaming video of California condor chicks have gained worldwide attention – attracting hundreds of thousands of viewers from all over the world.

“Today’s technology allows researchers like us to observe nests in remote locations without having to trek into the backcountry and wait for days, sometimes weeks, at observation blinds for a glimpse of the condors,” says Dr. Estelle Sandhaus, the Santa Barbara Zoo’s director of conservation and science. “With this live stream, the public can share in the thrill of seeing these rare and highly endangered birds care for their chick, and follow its development before it takes its first flight. What was once only seen by a few scientists is now available to anyone with an internet connection.”

In California, wild condors nest, roost or fly in the mountains of Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, Kern, Tulare and Fresno counties, and the western Sierra Nevada Mountains.

The 2018 nesting season was a record-breaking one, with 12 nests in the mountains of Ventura, Santa Barbara and Kern counties. Six of those nests were successful, the most ever in the Southern California flock.

“The success of last year’s nesting season was really monumental for the condor recovery program and a testament to the hard work of all the partners involved in this effort,” said Nicole Weprin, wildlife biologist with the Service’s California Condor Recovery Program. “We’re hopeful for another successful nesting season this year, and thrilled that the public can share in our excitement by watching the Condor Cam.”

The number of California condors dropped dramatically in the mid-20th century, leading the Service to designate the species as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. By 1982 there were only 22 of the iconic birds left in the wild. Today, due to intensive, ongoing captive breeding and recovery efforts led by the Service in conjunction with multiple public and private partners, the California condor population has grown to just under 490 birds worldwide, with more than half of the population flying free.

Today the number one killer of California condors is lead poisoning, caused by condors feeding on carcasses containing lead bullet fragments. Peer-reviewed research shows that lead poisoning is a serious health problem for both wildlife and humans, and the Service is working with partner organizations and the hunting community as it transitions to the use of non-lead ammunition alternatives. Hunters are continuing their proud tradition of wildlife conservation by using these non-lead alternatives.

Another threat specific to condor chicks is “micro trash.” Micro trash are small coin-sized trash items such as, nuts, bolts, washers, copper wire, plastic, bottle caps, glass, and spent ammunition cartridges. Condor parents collect these items and feed them to their chick, which can cause serious problems with the chick’s development. While it is not completely understood why this occurs, many biologists believe that the condor parents mistake these items for pieces of bone and shell which provides a source of calcium if fed to the chick.

Conservation efforts toward the recovery of the California condor are achieved only through partnerships amongst federal and state agencies, together with private landowners and organizations. The Pole Canyon Condor Cam is made possible through access provided by private landowners, and through the financial and technical support of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Santa Barbara Zoo, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the Western Foundation of Vertebrate Zoology, Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, and Friends of California Condors Wild and Free.

"The condor cams are unlike any other offering on the internet. Each year we've streamed from a different site and pair, and the differences among all these nests and individuals have given viewers a unique opportunity to understand more of the richness and variability of the condor's life history,” said Charles Eldermire, Cornell Lab Bird Cams project leader. “That's not just good for viewers—it's good for the condors, too."

To watch the Condor Cam, visit: www.allaboutbirds.org/condors

 

A presentation on the history of winemaking in Ventura County, and wine tasting from a local vintner will highlight “The Days of Wine and Spirits at Rancho Camulos” on Saturday, June 15 at 4:00 PM.

Historian Judy Triem will share her extensive viniculture research. Most people do not realize that between 1850 and 1900 some of the finest wine and brandy in all of California was produced at Rancho Camulos (which was then actually part of Santa Barbara County).

Following the presentation, local vintner, Bruce Freeman of Clos des Amis near Santa Paula will provide wine tastings of his locally grown, locally produced fine wines.

The tastings will be complemented by a delectable charcuterie board.

Spend an afternoon in the beautiful Heritage Valley and support the non-profit Rancho Camulos Museum’s historic education and restoration efforts. Your $30 donation will include Museum membership. Reservations should be made at.URL:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/days-of-wine-spirits-at-rancho-camulos-muse....