Looking to stay cool in the hot weather, the Cooling Center is open at the Fillmore Active Adult Center, 533 Santa Clara Street, Fillmore (805) 524-3030, and Fillmore Library, 502 Second Street, Fillmore (805) 524-3355.

 


 
Traffic accident, Friday, August 30, at approximately 7:35 a.m. The Chief of Police has informed Fillmore City Council that speed or use of a mobile device had no factor in this collision. This accident occurred on Edgewood. Residents of the neighborhood respectfully ask that everyone who lives near, travels in or around, or drops off their children at any of the nearby schools take extra care and be patient at this location. Also, if you’re traveling eastbound on Edgewood early in the morning, wear some protective eyewear—the sun from that direction is blinding and can inhibit your ability to drive safely.
Traffic accident, Friday, August 30, at approximately 7:35 a.m. The Chief of Police has informed Fillmore City Council that speed or use of a mobile device had no factor in this collision. This accident occurred on Edgewood. Residents of the neighborhood respectfully ask that everyone who lives near, travels in or around, or drops off their children at any of the nearby schools take extra care and be patient at this location. Also, if you’re traveling eastbound on Edgewood early in the morning, wear some protective eyewear—the sun from that direction is blinding and can inhibit your ability to drive safely.
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DON’T FORGET... Join us this Saturday, September 7th for the City of Fillmore’s Emergency Preparedness Day in Central Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. See emergency personnel and their vehicles, talk to real life heroes who respond to emergencies throughout Ventura County! We hope to see you this Saturday in Fillmore. Check out the FB Event link to get updates as they become available about this event: https://bit.ly/2lyDL8G. Courtesy City of Fillmore Instagram page.
DON’T FORGET... Join us this Saturday, September 7th for the City of Fillmore’s Emergency Preparedness Day in Central Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. See emergency personnel and their vehicles, talk to real life heroes who respond to emergencies throughout Ventura County! We hope to see you this Saturday in Fillmore. Check out the FB Event link to get updates as they become available about this event: https://bit.ly/2lyDL8G. Courtesy City of Fillmore Instagram page.
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On August 3rd the Nosotroz Car Club presented athlete participants of Fillmore Youth Football & Cheer with a generous check donation of $1800 from a barbecue dinner fundraiser which was held back on June 29th, 2019. Funds will be used by the organization to ensure the safest of equipment for its participants as well as field fees for practicing and hosting of local games. The Fillmore Raiders Youth Football & Cheer would like to express their overwhelming appreciation for the continuous support of the Nosotroz Car Club. Additional recognition and appreciation to our local restaurants for their donations/contributions: El Pescador, Brenda’s Casamia, La Fondita and La Michoacana. Pictured above is the Nosotroz Club with some the Fillmore Raiders Youth Football and Cheer participants. Photo courtesy Crystal Gurrola, information courtesy Fillmore Raiders Youth Football and Cheer.
On August 3rd the Nosotroz Car Club presented athlete participants of Fillmore Youth Football & Cheer with a generous check donation of $1800 from a barbecue dinner fundraiser which was held back on June 29th, 2019. Funds will be used by the organization to ensure the safest of equipment for its participants as well as field fees for practicing and hosting of local games. The Fillmore Raiders Youth Football & Cheer would like to express their overwhelming appreciation for the continuous support of the Nosotroz Car Club. Additional recognition and appreciation to our local restaurants for their donations/contributions: El Pescador, Brenda’s Casamia, La Fondita and La Michoacana. Pictured above is the Nosotroz Club with some the Fillmore Raiders Youth Football and Cheer participants. Photo courtesy Crystal Gurrola, information courtesy Fillmore Raiders Youth Football and Cheer.
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Photo of the Week: "Baldwin #14 gets a drink at the Loose Caboose" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7DMKII, manual mode, Tamron 16-300mm lens @16mm. Exposure; ISO 500, aperture f/11, 1/400 second shutter speed.
Photo of the Week: "Baldwin #14 gets a drink at the Loose Caboose" by Bob Crum. Photo data: Canon 7DMKII, manual mode, Tamron 16-300mm lens @16mm. Exposure; ISO 500, aperture f/11, 1/400 second shutter speed.
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The Magic Sauce
Bob Crum
Bob Crum

Some readers are charmingly curious. Larry M. suspected that there's more to photographic style than camera settings as discussed in the previous column. He asked: Besides camera settings, how is "style" implemented? The question presents a conundrum: Photographic style is as elusive to describe as balance, gravity and the taste of lasagna.

Let's make lasagna. I carefully layer the noodles, sauce, meat, minced garlic, whole milk ricotta and sliced mozzarella. After baking at 400Âş for 40 minutes, and cooled, I anxiously take the first bite. Ah! Now, let me describe the scrumptious flavor. HA! My brain tells me it tastes good, but it's impossible to articulate what my tongue's sensory taste buds tell my brain!

Lasagna and photography have much in common. To make a photo, we layer ISO, lens aperture and shutter speed in the camera. However, instead of an oven, we bake (post-process) the photo in the computer with photo editing software programs. Afterward, ah, a scrumptious photo emerges. But I can no more describe the magnificence my eyes see as I can describe the taste of lasagna. But oh how I enjoy both. The photo highlights so delicate. The background bokeh indescribable. Texture, detail and dynamic range so splendid words cannot describe the eye candy I see.

I realize that for many, post-processing, aka photo editing, is something to be avoided like sunbathing in a hail storm. I get it! But make no mistake; photo editing is essential if you desire to improve your photos. There isn't an alternative. No shortcuts. You edit, or you have to accept whatever your camera gives you.

Lest readers perceive that photo editing is a superficial exercise, a few words from George D. Lepp, an Outdoor Photographer magazine columnist. "Post-processing images is an essential element of digital photography. RAW capture (you're shooting in RAW format, aren't you?) [his words] is only the beginning of the process, not yet as good as the image can be - that's why it's called RAW. If you're shooting in JPEG format, you're letting the camera decide a lot about how your image will look."

Lepp added, "Now don't get me wrong: it's not just about 'fixing it' on the computer. I prefer the term 'optimizing.' When you sit down to edit, you still need to start with an image file that has good content and composition and is technically excellent."

A timely note from photographer Kevin Landwer-Johan on contrastly.com: "Know your camera so well you don’t have to think about it every moment you are using it. This will make you a better photographer." Excellent advice, however, that's merely one-half of the requisite for developing a photographic "style." Style is best accomplished in the digital darkroom. Photo editing software, the magic sauce, provides adjustment options for exposure, color and contrast to produce a photo like the scene as seen by the photographer. More importantly, the editing program also empowers the photographer to, ahem, embellish the photo to taste, which if applied consistently, combined with consistent camera settings, becomes the photographers photographic "style!" But perhaps you think photo editing is boring! Or worse, tedious? Au contraire, mon ami! 'Tis creative enjoyment beyond description.

The previous photo of the week of a sea lion was not stylized. Being a jpeg from my Panasonic P&S camera, attempting to apply a style to a jpeg with any photo editor is as useless as applying lipstick on a hippopotamus.

Photo of the week is Baldwin #14 steam engine's tender getting water at the Loose Caboose in Santa Paula Labor Day weekend.

Send comments, questions or suggestions to: focusonphotography@earthlink.net

 


 
[Editor's Note: At $7,000 a year, the City of Fillmore is, once again, providing Spanish translation for Council meetings. Tuesday’s City Council meeting was poorly attended. Two attendees had ear phones on and listened to a translator sitting in the back of the council chamber. This is a particularly wasteful expenditure of city money. It is also a major distraction. Listening to council proceedings from the dais, the translation sounds like an echo. The front TV screen is also dedicated to Spanish viewing or is shut down, like Tuesday’s meeting. This setup has been tried several times over the years. It’s always been a nuisance to cater to a handful of non-English speaking residents (often actually English-speaking). The answer - learn English or come with your own English-speaking friend to assist you. Why should 99 percent of the audience be inconvenienced and distracted!]
[Editor's Note: At $7,000 a year, the City of Fillmore is, once again, providing Spanish translation for Council meetings. Tuesday’s City Council meeting was poorly attended. Two attendees had ear phones on and listened to a translator sitting in the back of the council chamber. This is a particularly wasteful expenditure of city money. It is also a major distraction. Listening to council proceedings from the dais, the translation sounds like an echo. The front TV screen is also dedicated to Spanish viewing or is shut down, like Tuesday’s meeting. This setup has been tried several times over the years. It’s always been a nuisance to cater to a handful of non-English speaking residents (often actually English-speaking). The answer - learn English or come with your own English-speaking friend to assist you. Why should 99 percent of the audience be inconvenienced and distracted!]
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Ventura County Deputy Agriculture Commissioner Andy Calderwood gave a presentation on Ventura's now legal industrial hemp, approved in 2018. He mentioned that George Washington grew hemp on his farm for cordage. The county has approved about 4,000 acres for the production of hemp. Three of four crops can be produced in hot house environments. They can produce 5000 pounds per acre. It has an odor similar to marijuana. Certain oils such as CBD can be derived from this plant.

8-B Planning Commission's recommendations were accepted by the City Council, to wit: 1.Submit comments about amending the Downtown Specific Plan. 2.Direct City Staff to develop a Request Proposal and budget for City Council approval to select a consultant to update the Downtown Specific Plan.

8-C Council concluded that electric and natural gas technologies are available to achieve the climate goals and "we should be able to maintain local control and not be forced to use one source of energy over another". Staff's recommendation was approved to maintain local control of energy solutions.

8-D Staff recommended that the City Council: 1. Adopt the attached Resolution 19-3734 authorizing the City Manager to file a claim with the Ventura County Transportation Commission for the allocation of Transportation Development Act Funds for Fiscal Year 2019-20; and2. Approve the attached Budget Adjustment to recognize the actual TDA funding to be received for the FY 2019-20 budget. Council approved Staff's recommendation.

8-E REQUEST FOR DIRECTION REGARDING BILLING ISSUES. This lengthy agenda issue is available on the city's website. It concerns the method city should use to bill different groups for activities.

8-F TOWNE THEATRE. City Council, acting as the Successor Agency Board of Directors, providing comments and direction regarding the RFP for the Towne Theatre. City Council/Successor Agency Board authorized staff to solicit offers from private parties to purchase the Towne Theatre.

 


 
On Monday, August 26th at 9:57 a.m., a collision was reported on Grimes Canyon Road and Bardsdale Avenue. Once on scene crews found a white Ford sedan and a white Chevy pickup truck had collided, leaving the white Chevy truck in a ditch.
On Monday, August 26th at 9:57 a.m., a collision was reported on Grimes Canyon Road and Bardsdale Avenue. Once on scene crews found a white Ford sedan and a white Chevy pickup truck had collided, leaving the white Chevy truck in a ditch.
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Maia Yasmine James, of Palmdale.
Maia Yasmine James, of Palmdale.

District Attorney Gregory D. Totten announced today that Maia Yasmine James (DOB 06/12/97), of Palmdale, was sentenced to eight years in state prison, following her June 21, 2019, convictions for gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated and driving under the influence of alcohol causing injury. James also admitted special allegations that she inflicted great bodily injury, had a blood alcohol content of 0.15 percent or higher and injured additional victims.

On the evening of October 13, 2017, James drove into oncoming traffic on Highway 126 east of Fillmore and struck two vehicles traveling in opposing lanes. The passenger in James’ car was killed. The driver and passenger of the first vehicle James struck were seriously injured. Two occupants of the second vehicle James struck were also injured. Investigation by the California Highway Patrol found that James had a blood alcohol content of 0.258 percent after the collision, more than three times the legal limit, and had consumed more than seven alcoholic drinks.

After James pled guilty to her crimes, and prior to her sentencing, she was arrested and charged with felony driving under the influence of alcohol in San Diego County. Her case in San Diego County is still pending.

###

The Ventura County District Attorney’s Office is the public prosecutor for the county’s 850,000 residents. The office employs approximately 280 employees including attorneys, investigators, victim advocates, and other professional support staff who strive to seek justice, ensure public safety, and protect the rights of crime victims. Follow the Ventura County District Attorney’s Office on Twitter @VenturaDAOffice

 


 
Fillmore Unified School District
Fillmore Unified School District

RESOLUTION NO. 19-20-03 CALLING FOR FULL AND FAIR FUNDING OF CALIFORNIA’S PUBLIC SCHOOLS

WHEREAS, California has the sixth largest economy in the world, and the largest Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of any state in the nation; and

WHEREAS, despite California’s leadership in the global economy, the state falls in the nation’s bottom quintile on nearly every measure of public K-12 school funding and school staffing; and

WHEREAS, California ranks 45th nationally in the percentage of taxable income spent on education, 41st in per-pupil funding, 45th in pupil-teacher ratios and 48th in pupil-staff ratios; and

WHEREAS, K-12 school funding has not substantially increased, on an inflation-adjusted basis, for more than a decade; and

WHEREAS, under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), state funding for K-12 schools has only this year recently returned to levels predating the Great Recession of 2007; and

WHEREAS, the modest revenue increases since the implementation of LCFF have been eroded by rapidly increasing costs for health care, pensions, transportation and utilities; and

WHEREAS, 58 percent of California’s public school students are eligible for free and reduced-price lunch (13 percent above the national average), and 23 percent of California students are English learners, more than twice the national average; and

WHEREAS, California’s investment in public schools is out of alignment with its wealth. its ambitions, its demographics and the demands of a 21st-century education; and

WHEREAS, in 2007, a bipartisan group of California leaders commissioned a report titled Getting Down to Facts, which stated it would take an additional $17 billion annually to meet the State Board of Education achievement targets for K-12 schools; and

WHEREAS, in 2016, a California School Boards Association (CSBA) report, California's Challenge: Adequately Funding Education in the 21st Century, updated the Getting Down to Facts data and determined that, adjusting for inflation, an additional $22 billion to $40 billion annually would be required to provide all public school students with access to a high-quality education; and

WHEREAS, California funds schools at roughly $1,961 per student less than the national average, which translates to approximately $3,462 per student when adjusted for California being a high-cost state; and

WHEREAS, California trails the average of the top 10 states by almost $7,000 in per-pupil funding; and

WHEREAS, in Robles-Wong v. State of California, a group of plaintiffs led by CSBA argued that California’s school funding system violated Article IX of the State Constitution by denying all students access to an education that prepares them for economic security and full participation in our democratic institutions; and

WHEREAS, the California Supreme Court declined to hear the case by a 4-3 margin, prompting Justice
Goodwin H. Liu to write: “It is regrettable that this court, having recognized education as a fundamental right in a landmark decision 45 years ago [Serrano v. Priest (1971) 5 Cal.3d 584], should now decline to address the substantive meaning of that right.”; and

WHEREAS, in order to prepare our students for participation in a democratic society and an increasingly competitive, technology-driven global economy, California must fund schools at a level sufficient to support student success; and
WHEREAS, despite its vast wealth, California has consistently underfunded public education while widening its scope, adding new requirements and raising standards without providing appropriate resources to prepare all students for college, career and civic life; and

WHEREAS, if California is to close opportunity and achievement gaps and create a public school system that offers consistently high levels of education, the State must provide schools with the resources to meet the needs of their specific populations;

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the governing board of the FILLMORE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT urges the State Legislature to fund California public schools at the national average or higher by the year 2020, and at a level that is equal to or above the average of the top 10 states nationally by 2025 and to maintain, at a minimum, this level of funding until otherwise decreed.

Adopted this 20th day of AUGUST, 2019.
Motion made by: Virginia De La Piedra
Second made by: Scott Beylik
List members voting “aye”: Scott Beylik, Kelli Couse, Virginia De La Piedra, Sean Morris, Lucy Rangel
List members voting “no”: 0
List members abstaining: 0
List members not present: 0

FILLMORE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT
Board of Education
Virginia De La Piedra, 08/20/19
Virginia De La Piedra, Clerk

 


 
Starting September 6th at the Santa Paula Art Museum, Gabriel Cardenas of Fillmore will be instructing free weekly individual art projects, murals and more for teens ages 13 – 18 to learn design as well as develop their own artistic style. Photo courtesy Gabriel Cardenas.
Starting September 6th at the Santa Paula Art Museum, Gabriel Cardenas of Fillmore will be instructing free weekly individual art projects, murals and more for teens ages 13 – 18 to learn design as well as develop their own artistic style. Photo courtesy Gabriel Cardenas.

Calling all creative teens! On Friday, September 6, 2019, the Santa Paula Art Museum will launch its new “Teen Art Group,” a free, weekly, hands-on art-making experience for local teens ages 13-18. Teens can join artist in residence Gabriel Cardenas for weekly, individual art projects, learn about design, techniques and materials, and explore their own personal style. The group will also help plan and paint public murals around Santa Paula! All teens and all skill levels are welcome. Participation is free. Teen Art Group will meet at the Santa Paula Art Museum every Friday evening from 4:30pm to 6:30pm starting September 6, 2019. Teens can find and follow the group on Instagram @teenartgroup.

Teen Art Group will be led by painter, musician and “artivist” Gabriel Cardenas. Cardenas is currently a graduate student at Cal State University, Northridge (CSUN) where he is pursuing research in Chicano Art politics and Muralism. Previously, Gabriel exhibited his art in and around Santa Barbara where he received his bachelor’s degree from UCSB. As a teacher and mentor to youth in the community, Gabriel has led various mural installation projects in places such as Ortega Park, La Cumbre Jr. High, Franklin Neighborhood Center, Isla Vista, and Carpinteria. As a Ventura County local, he has painted murals in Santa Paula, Saticoy, Oxnard and participated in art shows and pop-ups in Ventura as well. Gabriel’s hope is to teach, mentor and foster a generation of critical thinkers through the practice of art.

The Santa Paula Art Museum occupies two historic buildings located at 117 N 10th Street and 123 N 10th Street in downtown Santa Paula. The Museum features rotating exhibitions of vintage and contemporary art, creative classes for children and adults, family-friendly events, live musical performances, a gift shop, and more. Regular museum hours are Wednesday through Saturday from 10:00am to 4:00pm, and Sunday from 12:00pm to 4:00pm. Regular admission is $4.00 for adults, $3.00 for seniors, and free for students and museum members. Contact the Museum by calling (805) 525-5554, or by e-mailing info@santapaulaartmuseum.org.