Construction at the FHS Career Technical Education (CTE) building is close to completion. They are working to complete the installation of hand railing and the electrical work for the welding booths. FHS is planning to work on staff and student orientation for the building and equipment during the month of September and hopes to have students in the classrooms after fall break. Stay tuned for information regarding a Grand Opening—it will be announced soon. Go Flashes! Above, is the agriculture building. Inset, the transportation building. Courtesy Fillmore Unified School Website.
Construction at the FHS Career Technical Education (CTE) building is close to completion. They are working to complete the installation of hand railing and the electrical work for the welding booths. FHS is planning to work on staff and student orientation for the building and equipment during the month of September and hopes to have students in the classrooms after fall break. Stay tuned for information regarding a Grand Opening—it will be announced soon. Go Flashes! Above, is the agriculture building. Inset, the transportation building. Courtesy Fillmore Unified School Website.
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On Saturday, September 18th, from 9am to noon, the City of Fillmore along with Fillmore Fire Department participated in Coastal Clean-Up Day. Residents gathered at Shiells Park to help clean the riverbeds and creeks throughout Fillmore. They collected nearly 400 lbs of garbage. A special thank you to all who came out to help. Pictured above is Lani Farr, Darlene Lopez, Theresa Robledo and Fillmore Parks and Recreation Coordinator Krista Martinez who helped in the clean-up. Photos Courtesy City of Fillmore Facebook Page.
On Saturday, September 18th, from 9am to noon, the City of Fillmore along with Fillmore Fire Department participated in Coastal Clean-Up Day. Residents gathered at Shiells Park to help clean the riverbeds and creeks throughout Fillmore. They collected nearly 400 lbs of garbage. A special thank you to all who came out to help. Pictured above is Lani Farr, Darlene Lopez, Theresa Robledo and Fillmore Parks and Recreation Coordinator Krista Martinez who helped in the clean-up. Photos Courtesy City of Fillmore Facebook Page.
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Ventura County Department of Public Health
Ventura County Department of Public Health

Ventura County Public Health has extended the indoor mask order, requiring all individuals, regardless of vaccination status, to wear face coverings when indoors in public settings, with limited exceptions. The order will continue to be in effect until October 19, 2021 or until it is extended, rescinded, superseded, or amended by the Health Officer. “Our current case rate of 19.3 is still considered widespread community transmission by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the California Department of Public Health,” said Public Health Officer Doctor Robert Levin. “We need to see a continued decrease in the case rate and hospitalizations before safely lifting indoor masking requirements to help prevent future surges.”

The order directs that face coverings must be worn over the mouth and nose – regardless of vaccination status – in all indoor public settings, venues, gatherings, and workplaces, including but not limited to offices, retail stores, restaurants and bars, theaters, family entertainment centers, conference and event centers, and government offices serving the public.

Individuals, businesses, venue operators, hosts, and others responsible for the operation of indoor public settings must:
• Require all patrons to wear face coverings for all indoor settings, regardless of their vaccination status; and
• Post clearly visible and easy-to-read signage at all entry points for indoor settings to communicate the masking requirements to all patrons. Signage is provided by Ventura County Public Health at www.vcrecovers.org.

This health order aims to reduce community transmission of COVID-19. Health officials are concerned by the substantial levels of increased community transmission, especially among unvaccinated people. In part, this is due to the widespread COVID-19 Delta variant, which is substantially more transmissible than previous forms of the virus. Recent information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also indicates that even fully vaccinated individuals can in some cases spread the Delta variant to others, and so indoor use of face coverings provides an important added layer of protection.

More information about COVID-19 available at: www.venturacountyrecovers.org

 


 
 


 
On Thursday, September 23rd from 5pm to 9pm is Fillmore’s Blue & White Night, which will take place at 2nd Street and Central Avenue. In preparation for Homecoming & Blue & White is where the students showcase their floats in the Homecoming Parade, which will begin Thursday at 6pm. This year’s theme is Beats By Flash. Homecoming game will take place Friday, September 24th, Varsity begins 7pm. Photo courtesy Angel Esquivel-AE News.
On Thursday, September 23rd from 5pm to 9pm is Fillmore’s Blue & White Night, which will take place at 2nd Street and Central Avenue. In preparation for Homecoming & Blue & White is where the students showcase their floats in the Homecoming Parade, which will begin Thursday at 6pm. This year’s theme is Beats By Flash. Homecoming game will take place Friday, September 24th, Varsity begins 7pm. Photo courtesy Angel Esquivel-AE News.
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"The Monsters Without" film to premiere at Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival.
"The Monsters Without" film to premiere at Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival.
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Fillmore High School graduates Randal Kamradt, Andrew Reilley, and Nicholas Medina are set to premiere their exciting new film The Monsters Without this October at the prestigious Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. An action-packed adventure through the Philippines featuring terrifying and amazing creatures from Filipino Mythology, The Monsters Without is the latest film from writer/director Kamradt (Faraway). The film features an international cast led by Jake Macapagal (Metro Manila, Watch List) including Reilley in a supporting role as Richard, an inventor, and Medina as voice of the monstrous villain Nameless.

The story is about a scrappy international team of scientists and mercenaries called P.H.A.S.E. who resolve to keep man and monster-kind safe.

Kamradt and Reilley traveled with a small team to the Philippines in 2017 and shot the film on location for 28 days. The complex shoot included filming in the beautiful Hindang Caves, working with dozens of extras, and extensive monster make-up. Reilley played multiple roles, not only appearing as Richard but also undergoing a complete make-up transformation to appear as The Kafir, a legendary creature. Once filming was completed, Medina contributed his vocal performance as the main villain.

A lengthy post-production process followed, as Kamradt created over 100 visual effects shots for the film. This included adding new computer-generated creatures and augmenting many of the real locations with otherworldly additions. During post-production, Kamradt also became Fillmore High School and Middle School's Video Production teacher, hoping to share his expertise with students and contribute to the town that raised him.

The Monsters Without is a thrilling love letter to genre cinema and the beautiful Philippines islands. The film will premiere on October 1st, 2021 at the Regal LA Live theater as part of the 37th Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. For more information visit http://www.themonsterswithout.com

 


 
Frank Erskine circa 1906. Frank came to Fillmore from Vermont in 1913 and later formed the Fillmore Citrus Protective District. Photos Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum. 


Frank Erskine c 1965
Caricature of Fillmore Herald editor Hamilton Riggs at the Artists' Barn

Above is a newspaper article regarding Fillmore Citrus Association Mexican Band was set to perform on December 11th, 1931 via radio performance. This band was formed back in 1925 along with the Fillmore American Band which both had 20 musicians. Photo Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum More photos online at www.fillmoregazette.com 

Tray made by Frank Erskine in the Museum Collections
Frank Erskine circa 1906. Frank came to Fillmore from Vermont in 1913 and later formed the Fillmore Citrus Protective District. Photos Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum. Frank Erskine c 1965 Caricature of Fillmore Herald editor Hamilton Riggs at the Artists' Barn Above is a newspaper article regarding Fillmore Citrus Association Mexican Band was set to perform on December 11th, 1931 via radio performance. This band was formed back in 1925 along with the Fillmore American Band which both had 20 musicians. Photo Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum More photos online at www.fillmoregazette.com Tray made by Frank Erskine in the Museum Collections
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Newspaper article about Fillmore Citrus Association Mexican Band set to perform on December 11th, 1931 via radio performance. This band was formed in 1925 along with the Fillmore American Band which both had 20 musicians.
Newspaper article about Fillmore Citrus Association Mexican Band set to perform on December 11th, 1931 via radio performance. This band was formed in 1925 along with the Fillmore American Band which both had 20 musicians.
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Tray made by Frank Erskine in the Museum Collections.
Tray made by Frank Erskine in the Museum Collections.
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Frank Erskine circa 1965.
Frank Erskine circa 1965.
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Courtesy Fillmore Historical Museum

You don’t have to serve as mayor or be elected to the city council to have an impact on your community. That’s true today and was true one hundred years ago. In 1913 a young man from Vermont came to Fillmore and was a force for good in the town. His name was Frank Erskine.

Frank was born in Williamstown, Vermont in 1879. His parents were farmers, though as Frank would later say, “Farms in Vermont are mostly rocks.” He had five siblings, four of whom died before Frank was 16 years old. His father, Henry Erskine, died when Frank was twenty. His mother, Jane, sold the farm and with his portion of the proceeds, Frank entered collage attending Albany Business College where he eventually taught. He developed one of the first high school business courses that was taught in New York state.

While in Albany, he married Miss Susan Benedict from his hometown. It was her brother-in-law, OrlowGriffen, who suggested Frank come to California to take a position with a fruit growers’ association in Whittier. He and his wife, Susan, made the move to California. In 1913, Frank was told about a struggling fruit growers’ association in a place called Fillmore and decided to make the move to Ventura County.

Erskine was to say that for the first years he battled competition and bugs with red and purple scale threatening the local citrus crops. He and David Felsenthal were instrumental in forming the Fillmore Citrus Protective District and eventually the Fillmore Insectary which focused on biological control of pests.

He left the Citrus Association in 1929 at age 50. Not able to sit idle, he was one of the founding directors of Ramona Savings and Loan and remained a director for 38 years, and vice-president for thirty-six. The purpose of Ramona was to help local families buy homes – even during the Great Depression. One advertisement Frank wrote read, “We will pay withdrawals on demand. We could use additional funds to lend.” The ad was effective because within seven days business transactions doubled.Frank retired from Ramona Savings and Loan in 1966.

Frank had played the cornet in Vermont at churches and other venues. A story has been told that when Frank Erskine first got off the train in Fillmore, he was carrying a cornet case. The first person to see him was C. A. Harmonson (the initials stood for Columbus Arizona) who quickly recruited him to play with the band his family participated in (The Harmonson Rood Orchestra).

One of the things Frank Erskine is most remembered for is his association with local bands. One band he was in would play concerts on Saturday nights on the site of the Masonic Building under the pepper tree. Others in the group included Al Haase, Ken Howard, Lawrence and Sidney Peyton, Clarence Arrasmith, Frank Middlesworth and Bobby Stiles.

His motto, ‘money spent for music is a sound investment” was put to the test. By 1925, he had formed two bands, the Fillmore American Band and the Fillmore Citrus Association Mexican band, each of about twenty musicians.Both bands wore red bow ties with white pants and shirts with suit jackets.The Mexican band “was first laughed at and then complimented when it won top prize at the county contest called the “Esteidfod’ that we used to have in Oxnard,” he said in an interview in 1970.

An advertising card for the bands read, “Fillmore American Band and the Fillmore Citrus Association Mexican Band can provide instrumentation in any number of men from 16 to 50 for music for any occasion.” They were soon in big demand.

Erskine particularly enjoyed combining the two bands. The groups frequently performed together as was noted in a Fillmore Herald article in a June 9, 1927,talking about a series of concerts the combined band would be giving in “front of the old High School.” The Mexican band, led by Manuel Lucero, performed a two-hour broadcast on Radio KMPC in 1931. Lucero also composed a piece called “The Erskine March.”Unfortunately, only the 1st Cornet part has survived but it is both challenging and tuneful. The members of the band also combined their efforts to purchase a cornet for Mr. Erskine – it is on display in the Museum.

He was very active in the Rotary serving as president for the 1937-1938 term.Besides being a musician, he was also an artist, with his caricatures rivaling those of Lawrence Hinckley’s. For the March, 1937 Rotary Ladies’ Night he did an entire pamphlet of “Candid Camera Counterfeits of Prominent Phillmore Personages.” Each Rotary member was lampooned with his own special illustration.

In retirement he took up marquetry, carefully creating designs on trays and other items from small pieces of wood. We have several examples of his detailed work in the Museum collection.

Perhaps one of the least known of his activities was being Santa Claus to Fillmore’s children. Widowed three times, he had no children of his own. For twenty years (probably with the collusion of fellow Rotarian and Postmaster J K L Schwartz) he answered the children’s letters to Santa Claus. He was a friendly, but practical Santa. When a chimney-less child expressed concern that Santa would not visit him, Santa replied, “I dislike chimneys – all that soot in a place too narrow for me. I come in the front door like any other welcome guest.” To a child with an extensive wish list, “If I brought you all that stuff this year, you’d have nothing for next year. You divide that list up and expect to find maybe one-fourth of it, after I call on you this year.”

Frank Erskine died in 1978 having just turned 99 years old. He was the last of his family and left no survivors, but did leave a large legacy to the community.

 
On Saturday, September 11th, Fillmore City Fire Department hosted a memorial ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. They gathered at 6:30am and promptly raised the American flag at 6:55am, followed by a countywide radio broadcast remembrance. Refreshments were served afterwards for those who attended the memorial. Photos courtesy Angel Esquivel—AE News.
On Saturday, September 11th, Fillmore City Fire Department hosted a memorial ceremony marking the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001. They gathered at 6:30am and promptly raised the American flag at 6:55am, followed by a countywide radio broadcast remembrance. Refreshments were served afterwards for those who attended the memorial. Photos courtesy Angel Esquivel—AE News.
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Voters at Saint Francis Church.
Voters at Saint Francis Church.
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On Tuesday, September 14th at Saint Francis Catholic Church, members of the community lined up outside the polling station to vote in the 2021 Gubernatorial Recall Election. As for results, California voted NO on recalling California Governor Gavin Newsom who received 63.9% of the votes. For information visit https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/
2021/09/14/us/elections/results-california-recall.html

 
The Dye Scholarship Foundation Day Cornhole Tournament took place on Monday, September 6th and was a huge success, raising over $10,000. Pictured (l-r) are Dustin Parkins, Sandy Dye, Jerry Lopez and Lucio Pertile. Dustin and Lucio took first place in this year’s tournament.
The Dye Scholarship Foundation Day Cornhole Tournament took place on Monday, September 6th and was a huge success, raising over $10,000. Pictured (l-r) are Dustin Parkins, Sandy Dye, Jerry Lopez and Lucio Pertile. Dustin and Lucio took first place in this year’s tournament.
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The Dye Scholarship Foundation (DSF) raised over $10,000 at its Labor Day Cornhole Tournament and Games event. The cornhole tournament was run by Jerry Lopez and his crew from Bag Habits of Simi Valley. The first place team in the hotly contested tournament were Lucio Pertile and Dustin Parkins from Ventura. Second and Third place went to the teams from Bakersfield, Tyler Valverde and Andrea Baca, and from Simi Valley, Samantha Ohmie and Art Newcomb.

Community volunteer groups included the Ventura County Search and Rescue Team 1 from Fillmore who brought out their Command Post for tours and demos, and Girl Scout Troop 65105 from Santa Paula, who provided games and activities for the younger kids. Pepsico was a major sponsor, donating 650 beverages to the event, and sponsoring their team, Chris Cartee and David Gomez as tournament players. The Ventura County Deputy Sheriff's Association and the Ventura Sheriff's Foundation both provided team sponsorships. Local businesses donated gift certificates which were raffled off, or used as prizes, including Lazy Dog, Lure, Wood Ranch, Islands, Target, Vons, Panera, Presto Pasta and Smart & Final. If you missed it, don't worry, as we are already planning for next year, and the good news is you have a whole year to practice your cornhole skills!

The DSF is a 501(c)(3) non-profit providing scholarships to Ventura County students pursuing vocational career education. 100% of all donations are awarded to recipients with no administrative fees withheld.

https://dyescholarshipfoundation.givingfuel.com/dye