The new Board at the Fillmore Senior Center will have their regular scheduled meeting on Monday, Aug. 25 at the Senior Center at 10:00. It is open to the public. New programs and classes will be discussed. The usual Starbuck coffee and treats will be available before the meeting.
Fillmore Senior Citizens are reminded that the local “Dial-a-Ride” bus is available to pick them up and take them to the Senior Center for the noon meal or classes without charge. Transportation can be arranged by calling 524-2319.
The Senior Center needs additional bookcases, magazine racks and comfortable chairs with arms for their lounge area. Seniors need seating that is high, firm and easy for standing. Anyone who has items to donate may call Marie Wren, 524-4044, for pickup.

 


 

Hundreds of Ventura County residents are on the MOVE to end Alzheimer’s disease at the annual Alzheimer’s Association’s Memory Walk. This year there will be two Memory Walks in Ventura County; one in Ventura and the second in Thousand Oaks. The event raises public awareness and funds for the fight against Alzheimer's disease. In 2007 Memory Walk Ventura County residents raised $79,000 for care and support of those affected by the disease and research for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's.

WHEN: Saturday, September 27th ~OR~ Saturday, October 18th
Registration 9:00 am Registration 9:00 am
Walk begins 10:00 am Walk begins 10:00 am

WHERE: Ventura Harbor, Ventura Gardens of the World, Thousand Oaks

HOW: To start a team or make a donation, contact the Alzheimer’s Association www.CentralCoastAlz.org or 805-485-5597.

About the Alzheimer's Association:
Our mission is to provide and enhance care and support for all those affected by Alzheimer’s, to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health and to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; The Alzheimer’s Association, Central Coast Chapter also has offices in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara and serves over 40,000 Alzheimer’s patients and their families every year. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s.

 


 
Bob McCullagh, certified instructor and senior advocate with the SCAN Senior Resource Center, demonstrates a stretch technique at the Fillmore Senior Center.
Bob McCullagh, certified instructor and senior advocate with the SCAN Senior Resource Center, demonstrates a stretch technique at the Fillmore Senior Center.
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Fillmore Senior Center and SCAN Senior Resource Center have teamed up to offer a special 90-minute class to help seniors increase their strength, balance, endurance and agility through a home exercise program. "Senior Stretch at Home" will be held on August 8 at the Fillmore Senior Center at 533 Santa Clara St., Fillmore. A free Stretch Band Kit ($10 value) will be provided to participating seniors.
“Physical activity does not need to be strenuous or time-consuming,” said Bob McCullagh, a certified instructor and senior advocate with the SCAN Senior Resource Center. “My goal is to help people discover simple ways to make activity part of their day and help them reap the health rewards of being more active.”
This class is specifically designed for individuals who don't want to commit to an ongoing exercise class. Participants will gain:
• the motivation needed to get started,
• an understanding of what to do, and
• instruction from a fellow senior uniquely qualified to lead them into a higher level of fitness and health.
Refreshments will be served. Call 658-0365 for more information and to register. Space is limited.
For more than 30 years, SCAN Health Plan has been focusing on the unique needs of people with Medicare and today is the fourth largest non-profit Medicare Advantage plan in the United States. The company currently serves more than 105,000 members in Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Ventura and Kern counties. In Arizona, SCAN offers a health plan for Medicare and Medicaid-eligible individuals and also provides long-term care services to individuals enrolled in the state’s long-term care system in Maricopa County. Further information may be obtained at www.scanhealthplan.com.

 


 

The Fillmore Senior Center is actively looking for someone who may want to volunteer their time by teaching a class. Maybe you can teach one hour a month, or possibly 10 hours a month. You make the decision. Currently a computer class is being taught at the center and it has become so popular, there’s even a waiting list. There’s also an excellent Craft Class being offered weekly. Currently the Center is working on an upcoming beginning Art Class, (Starting out with Water Colors). A local artist will teach the class, and the goal is for each participant to walk away with their artwork in their hand that same day. Keep an eye out for this class, and be sure to sign up right away as we are anticipating a strong turnout for this activity. A Garden Class will be coming in the near future. In the Garden Class we’re looking to help local residents with questions pertaining to their gardening needs here in Fillmore, for example, cutting and pruning Roses, types of fertilizers to use for different plants, separating bulbs, etc. We will inform you well in advance of these classes and how to sign up for them.
So if you have a special hobby and you would be willing to teach a class to the great seniors of this community, please contact Mr. Mark Ortega at 805-856-8949. You also can call the Senior Center and leave a message for him at 805-524-4533.
Remember the seniors of our community deserve the Best!! Please give Mark a call, and come support them.

 


 

The Senior Center continues to expand and add additional activities for Fillmore citizens over 55 years of age. The meeting last week reported on an overflowing computer class with a waiting list. The Book club is starting and bingo and puzzles continue. The craft class meets weekly. An art class will soon be started for beginning artists. The time and date will be announced. Anyone who is interested should call the Center and get on the list.
That Board hopes to purchase a used piano to be available for monthly entertainment and activities. A bookcase is needed to start a free circulating library for paperbacks. Additional furniture is needed for the TV corner. A couch and chairs that are firm, set high and have arms would be appreciated. Anyone with suggestions or donations is urged to call the Senior Center.
The Board has scheduled a workshop to discuss the annual budget for 9 a.m. on August 18th with the regular Board Meeting on Aug. 25th. This workshop meeting will be open to the public so everyone in the community understands about the financing for the Center and activities.
The new Board hopes for input from the community to develop the center into a first rate meeting place for seniors. A monthly calendar is available at senior apartments, civic organizations and churches to keep everyone in touch. Personal copies may be picked up at the Senior Center.
The Board needs chairmen to work out details for Social Services, Entertainment, (trips and special events), Activities (more weekly classes), and Health meetings (blood pressure clinic, health fair, Braille and sight help, diabetes support group). Anyone with an interest in these activities should call Board President Loretta Dunehew 524-1969 or Vice-president Marie Wren 524-4044.
With everyone cooperating in Fillmore, the Senior Center expects to better serve the needs of the older citizens in town. Any questions may also be sent to the Center at 524-4533.

 


 

The newly elected Board of Directors of the Fillmore Senior Center will be meeting at 10 a.m. in the Center on August 18th for a workshop with Finance Director Barbara Smith to go over the budget for 2008-2009. This meeting is open to the public but no questions will be taken from the floor.
A copy of the budget is posted at the Center for public information. A copy may be picked up at City Hall also. Anyone who has specific questions should put them in writing and leave at City Hall or give to any Board member to pass along to the Finance Director no later than 5 p.m. on Thursday, August 14th. This workshop is being held to help the new Board members understand the financing for the Center and sponsored activities.

 

Caregivers, friends, and family members are invited to attend a presentation on Understanding Dementia at the Santa Paula Senior Center on Friday, August 15 at 1 PM . Norma Featherson of the Alzheimer’s Association will speak on normal aging, the brain and dementia, and communication. There will also be an opportunity for questions and answers. The River Valley Club will provide respite care; call 525-5808 to make arrangements. The Senior Center is located at 530 W. Main Street. For information call 933-4226 ext. 356

 
A typical party at the Fillmore Senior Center, 1997. “There were a lot of events like this, including a talent show that brought in a large crowd,” said Dorothy Lynch, long time Fillmore resident, now residing in Texas. “We seemed to have gatherings and parties for any ol’ occasion. We once had a Christmas party that included Jim Caldwell playing Santa, with Nancy Bowlin as his helper.” Congratulations to the new Board--they’re off to a great start!
A typical party at the Fillmore Senior Center, 1997. “There were a lot of events like this, including a talent show that brought in a large crowd,” said Dorothy Lynch, long time Fillmore resident, now residing in Texas. “We seemed to have gatherings and parties for any ol’ occasion. We once had a Christmas party that included Jim Caldwell playing Santa, with Nancy Bowlin as his helper.” Congratulations to the new Board--they’re off to a great start!
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Fillmore Senior Center, 1997
Fillmore Senior Center, 1997
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The Senior Center has had a wonderful turn-out for the new computer class. The class is full and is held on Tuesday led by Gayle Washburn and Dave Roegner.
The Senior Center has had a wonderful turn-out for the new computer class. The class is full and is held on Tuesday led by Gayle Washburn and Dave Roegner.
Enlarge Photo
 

Entering the darkened room the first thing noticed is the bed being lit up by the TV hanging from the wall. A closer look you could make out the figure of an old may stretched out under the covers. “We keep the TV on as a means to stimulate his senses,” said the nurses’ aid that accompanied me into the room. “He hasn’t spoken or acknowledged anyone since he has been here. That was six months ago,” the aid added.

As I approached with my dog, a giant Saint Bernard, I noticed that the old man wasn’t really paying any attention to the TV, but was looking blankly at what could only be described as into infinity. His world was somewhere beyond the here and now.

The aid called out his name but there was no response, just that blank gaze. She once again called out his name and stated that he should look over to the side of his bed as he had a visitor.

I moved forward with the Saint at my side. As we approached the dog placed its head on the bed and gave the old man laying there a gentle nuzzle. You could hear a pin drop as the sound of silence roared deafeningly in the room. The sound of a sheet could be heard rattling as this old hand exited from under the blanket. The hand, weathered with time and age, moved toward the head of the giant dog that still had it head resting on the bed. The hand reached up and placed itself on the top of the dogs head, stroking it ever so gently. “Good dog,” was heard coming from the old man. These were the first words that had been spoken in six month. This was the first time that the man laying in the bed had acknowledged that someone or something was in the room with him.

This is why I got into working with therapy dogs at the convalescent centers and various hospitals. I have been training Saint Bernards for 12 years. My first saint was an AKC champion in obedience. He weighed in at over 230 lbs. My second Saint was being trained in obedience when he developed cancer. Rather than put him through obedience his trainer suggested that I start working him as a therapy dog.

He definitely had the gentle temperament for the job unlike my first dog, Omar, who would have taken your head off outside the show ring. So as Barney went through his various treatments for cancer, twelve operations, 20 rounds of radiation and eight rounds of chemotherapy, he started working in the local convalescent centers and cancer hospitals. After all, what could be better for a cancer patient than to see another patient that was going through much the same treatment they were going through? Barney became certified and the organization he belonged to insured him and all the other dogs and animals belonging to the organization with an insurance policy of $100,000. This was how sure the organization was about the animals they used around hospital and convalescent patients.

Barney served as a therapy dog for over a year and a half when the cancer finally took its toll. Never once did he complain or show any signs of being in any pain. He simply went about doing what he did best, bringing joy and comfort to the sick and elderly.

Just before Barney passed away, Rose came to me as a rescue from the Colorado Prison System. At the prison they have a program that rescues dogs and then has prisoners raise and train them. To get into the program which is a special privilege, a convict has to be on their best behavior. Rose who came into the program at around eight weeks, stayed in the program until she was seven months old. I drove to Colorado and picked her up.

She now serves as Barney did, having become a fully registered therapy dog. Fact is she is so well trained that she has a couple of tricks that seems to bring a chuckle to those at our local convalescent hospital. She has been taught to wave and as she goes from room to room she waves to each patient as she leaves the room.

She has brought joy to those that seldom get to leave the facility as she goes about her duty bringing about somewhat of a feeling of normalcy to those confined to not only the general wards but also to those special patients that are having their minds being eaten away by that dreaded Alzheimer’s. She will go into the room and many will throw their arms around her neck in a bear hug simply because they can relate to an animal where they can’t with a human being. Rose takes the attention in stride, licking and kissing each one as she goes about doing her duty and bringing cheer.

Rose has even gone to the funerals of several of the people that have gotten to know her in life. One service comes to mind. It was at Bardsdale when the family and friends had finished paying their final respects, Rose and I walked quietly to the casket. As I also paid my final respects, you get to know many of the patients as you work with them, Rose sat beside me and raised her paw and waved good-by, her final show of respect for the person that had now passed on to the next life which hopefully will have animals to care for those in death that Rose cared for in life.

 
Alzheimer’s Association to Host Town Hall Meeting on Early Stage Alzheimer’s Disease

More than 5 million people in the United States are currently living with Alzheimer’s; about half of which are in the early stages of the disease when they still retain many abilities and can contribute in the planning of their own care and future. The Alzheimer’s Association is hosting several regional Town Halls across the U.S. to give people living with the disease the opportunity to discuss issues they face and share helpful resources, programs and services.

The goal of this discussion is to give those with Alzheimer’s disease a unique opportunity to share perspectives and connect with others who are living with the disease. This is also an opportunity for the Alzheimer's Association to listen and learn from those who are still able to advocate for themselves. Ultimately, this group will influence future resources, public policy efforts and general awareness about the realities of this disease.

“This is the first open forum for individuals in the early stages of Alzheimer’s in Ventura County” said Norma Featherston, Area Director, Ventura County. We look forward to this opportunity to not only listen directly to those diagnosed with the disease, but also reach out to them by gaining new information that will help the Alzheimer's Association deliver the best care and support to all those living with the disease.”

For those in the early stages of Alzheimer’s this is our chance to be active participants in the shaping of programs, services and public policy. We are extremely excited to be a part of this platform for change on how society views people with Alzheimer’s and how services can best assist people in the various stages of the disease and their caregivers.

This event, co-sponsored by Senior Concerns, will be moderated by Loretta Redd, Executive Director, Alzheimer’s Association, Central Coast Chapter. The moderator will lead the Town Hall discussions and introduce panelists; a Question and Answer period will follow.

The Town Hall is free of charge, and will be held on July 31, 2008 from 6 to 7:30 PM at Senior Concerns, 401 Hodencamp Road, Thousand Oaks, CA. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call the Alzheimer’s Association at 805 485 5597.

 

Please find attached, the Fillmore Senior Center Bylaws.

 

On Thursday, July 24 the Santa Paula Senior Center will present a special talk, Diabetes Realities. Topics will include an overview of diabetes, nutrients and meal planning, glucose meters, and foot care. There will also be a Question and Answer period. Amani Hishmeh, Diabetes Certified Pharmacist, is the speaker.

The presentation will be at 12:45, after Senior Nutrition Lunch. Call 933-4226 ext 355 to make a lunch reservation. For those 60 and older, there is a suggested donation of $2.25.

For more information call the Santa Paula Senior Center at 933-4226 ext 356. The Senior Center is located at 530 W. Main St.

The Santa Paula Senior Center Presents
DIABETES REALITIES
Thursday, July 24
12:45 p.m.

Topics include:
• Diabetes Overview
• Nutrients and Meal Planning
• Glucose Meters
• Foot Care
• Questions & Answers

Speaker: Amani Hishmeh, Diabetes Certified Pharmacist

Santa Paula Senior Center, 530 W. Main St.
Call 933-4226 ext. 356 for information

 

Fillmore Senior Center invites you all to join their Book of the Month Club. First meeting will be held Tuesday, July 22, 2008 at 10:30am at the Fillmore Senior Center, 533 Santa Clara. For information call Lori 524-4533, Sarah 524-0132, or Geri 524-1591.

 

Summertime is known for its popcorn movies—blockbuster cinema full of explosions, action and larger-than life heroes. A couple hours in a darkened theater can have you at the edge of your seat and feeling like a kid again.

Now, take a closer look at some of the movie heroes flashing across the silver screen this summer. Could it be that your hero’s most challenging nemesis is deciding whether it’s time to retire?

Take this summer’s biggest action hero, Indiana Jones. Harrison Ford—still doing his own stunts—is 66 years old. Before he trots across the globe for another adventure, he may want to apply online for his retirement benefits at www.socialsecurity.gov.

Another box office champ returning this year is Batman. The Dark Knight first appeared in 1939—the same year as Superman—in Detective Comics. That makes both caped crusaders eligible for retirement benefits. Surely there must be computers in the Bat Cave and Fortress of Solitude with access to www.socialsecurity.gov to file online for their benefits.

Other heroes on the screen this summer include The Incredible Hulk and Iron Man. Both are products of the 1960s, like the actors who portray them. They’ll have a while to wait. But it’s never too early to start planning for retirement by visiting www.socialsecurity.gov/planners.

Even though the ladies from Sex and the City may not be ready to retire just yet, they should be planning ahead by going to Social Security’s For Women page at www.socialsecurity.gov/women.

Of course, retirement isn’t what it used to be. The average person preparing for retirement today isn’t getting ready to sit on the porch and lounge away. They’re ready for action.

These days, retirement is the opening of a new chapter—a sequel of sorts. So whether you’re ready to complete that application for benefits or need to do some retirement planning, the place to go is not the silver screen, but the computer screen, at www.socialsecurity.gov.

 

Continuing his commitment to protect California’s seniors, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger today signed SB 1343 by Senator Jim Battin (R-La Quinta), giving seniors and disabled adults the right to have up to two support persons with them when delivering difficult testimony in cases of elder abuse.

“By allowing a friend or family member in the courtroom while giving difficult testimony, elderly and disabled adults will feel more comfortable coming forward and pressing charges to allow justice to be served. This legislation not only protects this vulnerable community but helps to prevent these types of crimes from happening again,” Governor Schwarzenegger said.

In addition to signing this legislation, Governor Schwarzenegger has previously taken steps to protect California's seniors by:

Giving judges additional tools to provide restitution to elders and dependent adults who are victims of financial abuse through signing SB 611 .
Protecting seniors from unscrupulous lenders when they enter into reverse mortgages through enacting SB 1609.
Safeguarding seniors from financial abuse by requiring bank, savings and loan, and credit union employees who suspect elder financial abuse to immediately notify Adult Protective Services, which investigates reports of elder abuse, or law enforcement authorities through signing SB 1018.
Strengthening penalties for misrepresentation of insurance policies that induce a person to take actions that are not in his or her best interest through signing SB 1273. This bill addresses the financial crime in insurance called "twisting and churning," which often targets senior citizens.
Increasing criminal penalties for elder and dependent adult abuse through enacting AB 2611.

 

June 23, 2008
TO: Fillmore Senior Center Board of Directors
FROM: Annette Cardona, Community Services Supervisor
City of Fillmore
SUBJECT: Change of Bylaws for the Fillmore Senior Center

BACKGROUNG: Fillmore Senior Center Board of Directors would like to elect an additional five (5) members to their board on June 23, 2008. At this time the Bylaws read – the directors shall be elected at the first regular meeting of the Board of Directors.

ARTICLE III. DIRECTORS:

Section 3.01. Number. As provided in Article IV of the Articles of Incorporation of the Corporation, the Corporation shall have seven (7) Directors.

Section 3.02. Qualification. The Directors of the Corporation shall be residents of the City of Fillmore and shall be not less than fifty-five (55) years of age at the time of nomination.

Section 3.05. Election. The Directors shall be elected within 60 days of the fiscal year of the Corporation. The candidates receiving the highest number of votes up to the number of Directors shall be eligible for reelection without limitation on the number of terms they many serve, provided they continue to meet the qualifications required by Section 3.02.

RECOMMENDATION: Staff would like to recommend to the Fillmore Senior Center Board of Directors that we change ARTICLE III. Sections 3.01, 3.02, & 3.05 of the Bylaws to elect the new Board of Directors. If the Bylaws are not voted on to be changed then the new board cannot be elected until the July 28, 2008 meeting.

FISCAL IMPACT: None at this time.

CONCUR______________________________
Tom Ristau, City Manager

 
Community Health Nurse Angela Glover, with the VC Health Care Agency, visits the El Dorado Mobile Home Estates once a month to give free healthcare to local seniors. Here she assesses resident Dee Dicey. Included in her mobile services are blood pressure screenings, blood sugar, Health Risk Assessment, BMI Index, Hemo and Cholesterol levels, and bone density checks in the future. Glover is hoping to come into the Fillmore Senior Center soon. She named Braille, weight baring, balance classes, HICAP, Greylaw, Red Cross, and Medicare as just a few agencies and program that could be brought into the center.
Community Health Nurse Angela Glover, with the VC Health Care Agency, visits the El Dorado Mobile Home Estates once a month to give free healthcare to local seniors. Here she assesses resident Dee Dicey. Included in her mobile services are blood pressure screenings, blood sugar, Health Risk Assessment, BMI Index, Hemo and Cholesterol levels, and bone density checks in the future. Glover is hoping to come into the Fillmore Senior Center soon. She named Braille, weight baring, balance classes, HICAP, Greylaw, Red Cross, and Medicare as just a few agencies and program that could be brought into the center.
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Also show is her assistant taking an El Dorado resident’s blood-pressure.
Also show is her assistant taking an El Dorado resident’s blood-pressure.
Enlarge Photo
 

Alzheimer’s Care Consulting will begin at the Senior Center beginning Wednesday June 11th. By appointment only, Please call the Senior Center @ 524-4533. This service will be on the 2nd Wednesday of the month from 11:00-1:00.

 

Come start your day off with a refreshing walk. Beginning June 16th at 8:00 a.m. This will be offered every Monday morning @ 8:00 a.m. Meeting place: Senior Center.