The Mt. Vista School Readers and Writers of the Month are as follows: 2nd Grade: Aurora Arellano, Gary Boon,
Isaac Cervantes, Mia Barron, Abe DeLa Cruz and Kara Albanez.
The Mt. Vista School Readers and Writers of the Month are as follows: 2nd Grade: Aurora Arellano, Gary Boon, Isaac Cervantes, Mia Barron, Abe DeLa Cruz and Kara Albanez.
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3rd Grade: Diego Rivera, Adrian Fuentes, Justin Contreras, Salvador Estrada, David Recendez, Sofia Avalos, Aleena Sanchez and Alexa Martinez.
3rd Grade: Diego Rivera, Adrian Fuentes, Justin Contreras, Salvador Estrada, David Recendez, Sofia Avalos, Aleena Sanchez and Alexa Martinez.
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4th Grade: Leslie Ortiz, Juan Zaragoza, Caleb Munoz, Emma Boon, Aliyah Lefferts and Nuviah Vega (not pictured).
4th Grade: Leslie Ortiz, Juan Zaragoza, Caleb Munoz, Emma Boon, Aliyah Lefferts and Nuviah Vega (not pictured).
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5th Grade: Jazmin Aguirre, Jonathan Castillo, Diego Alcaraz, Jeanette Kirkpatrick, Alex Huchin, Ricardo Vasquez, Ana Romero and Isabella Minjares.
5th Grade: Jazmin Aguirre, Jonathan Castillo, Diego Alcaraz, Jeanette Kirkpatrick, Alex Huchin, Ricardo Vasquez, Ana Romero and Isabella Minjares.
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Camarillo, CA - Slime, banana pianos and the ever-popular screaming Gummi bears will be among more than 80 exploding, oozing, glowing and just plain fascinating hands-on science activities at CSU Channel Islands (CI)’s Seventh Annual Science Carnival.

Kids from kindergarten through eighth grade and their families are welcome to the free Halloween-themed Science Carnival, although Professor of Chemistry Philip Hampton, Ph.D., who organizes the carnival every year, says he has a broad definition of “kid.”

“I’m a kid myself,” he said. “We welcome ‘kids’ from one to 100 years old.”

This year’s Science Carnival will be held Saturday, Oct. 24 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Thurgood Marshall Elementary School at 2900 Thurgood Marshall Drive in Oxnard. Attendance at the event has increased more than tenfold since it began in 2009 with about 250 people in attendance. Hampton started the carnival with the help of two students.

Last year, 3,200 children and adult “kids” showed up to see the mirth and magic behind science.

“I just want kids to see the fun in science,” Hampton said. “I just want them to engage in a night of science and say ‘Hey! I think I can do science!’”

The first carnival had 30 displays compared with this year, which will boast 83 demonstrations.

Like Disneyland, this year’s carnival has themed areas including: Imagination Zone; Tomorrowland; Wonderland; Carnival Zone; Launch Zone; Discovery Zone; Pyro Zone and the Sensation Zone.

Each themed area will house science demonstrations consistent with the name. For example, Imagination Zone will offer kids the chance to make their own lip balm, perfume and the ever-popular “make your own slime” station.

And yes, parents, your junior scientists get to take the slime home with them.

“It’s one of the kids’ favorite things,” Hampton said. “It’s kind of disgusting and that’s exactly what kids like in science.”

Another crowd-pleaser will be the Pyro Zone, where various experiments explode safely onstage, including self-carving pumpkins that explode into Jack-o-Lanterns and the Propane Mamba, which involves bubbles that catch fire on volunteers’ hands when the bubbles are ignited.

The Pyro Zone is also where guests will see the combustion of sucrose, better-known as the Screaming Gummi Bear.

The Science Carnival has also enjoyed new partners and more collaboration each year. This year the carnival welcomes the Gull Wings Children’s Museum, First Five of Ventura County, and the Discovery Center. .

Beneath all the slime and explosions is a purpose, Hampton said. Exposing students to the wonders of science aligns with the Ventura County STEM Regional Network’s goals.
VC STEM is a leadership hub for businesses, schools, parent organizations and many other entities interested in attracting students to STEM careers and making STEM education the best it can be in Ventura County.

This year, the carnival is drawing in volunteers from some of the science and teaching academies in the Oxnard Union High School District.

The Science Carnival is funded in part through CI’s Project ACCESO, a U.S. Department of Education Hispanic-Serving Institution grant that promotes STEM learning. Funding also comes from the California Los Padres Section of the American Chemical Society.

Free parking is available at the elementary school and at nearby Oxnard High School but is somewhat limited. We encourage you to come early and look for message signs with information about parking. Kids are encouraged to wear their Halloween costumes! Food truck on site.

For more: http://www.csuci.edu/sciencecarnival.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 


 

The Fillmore High School Parent Teacher Organization will meet on, Wednesday, October 21, 2015 at 6:30 PM at the high school, front office Conference Room. Please join us and have a say in the future of your child’s high school experience.

Board meetings are one hour and we stick to the Agenda. Public Comment allows anyone three minutes to voice opinions or offer suggestions for the board to take under consideration. We’d love to hear from you.

Parental involvement is an important aspect to your children’s success in school. Becoming a PTO volunteer or board member is a great way to be involved! We are currently accepting nominations for PTO Secretary. If you or someone you know might be interested, please submit your nominations at or prior to the PTO meeting on October 21, 2015.

You may submit written nominations to board members, Mike Van De Mheen, Danielle Quintana, Debbie Galarza, or Rosa Garcia or to Anna Morielli or Barbara Lemons in the high school office prior to the meeting. Written nominations should include the nominee’s name and contact information so that we can verify candidacy.

For further information, please visit our Facebook page at: Fillmore High PTO

 

Click here https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07H9SHK55 to get your free eBook today.


 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will host a celebration of the official launch of the Ventura County STEM Regional Network beginning at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23 at the CI Boating Center at the Channel Islands Harbor.

“This is sort of a coming-out party for our VC STEM network,” explained VC STEM Planning Director Philip Hampton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry at CI. “We’ve spent almost a year planning. Now we move from the ideation stage to the action stage.”

The VC STEM Network is a leadership hub for regional companies, universities, government agencies, parks, schools, museums and a host of other local organizations working together to improve educational outcomes in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) for all students throughout Ventura County.

VC STEM was made possible by a $75,000 grant awarded at the end of 2014 by the Amgen Foundation, the charitable arm of the Thousand Oaks biotechnology company.

Hampton put together the grant proposal and has since headed a steering committee that put together another grant to further benefit the network.

VC STEM was launched under the Ventura County P-20 Council, a group of like-minded partners from education, business, parent organizations and other community agencies interested in making Ventura County’s educational system the best it can be. The P-20 Council is chaired by CI President Richard R. Rush.

Legislators, educators and P-20 councilmembers are among those invited to the VC STEM launch, which will begin with demonstrations of partnerships including crowd-pleasing exhibits from Hampton’s popular Science Carnival, which is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 24 at Thurgood Marshall Elementary School in Oxnard.

“I may bring the banana piano or maybe have Oreos or saltines dipped in liquid nitrogen,” Hampton said.

When the VC STEM network gets down to work, members will concentrate on three areas: 1) Early STEM learning; 2) STEM expanded learning; and 3) STEM professional learning for educators.

Early STEM will involve a look at how to stimulate kids’ interest in science from birth to Grade 3, and ways to introduce math at an early age.

STEM expanded learning is about science outside of the classroom, which may include science or technology clubs kids attend after school.

“It’s a powerful area where you can introduce science in an informal setting,” Hampton said. “Like computers and 3-D printing.”

The third area of concentration will concern ways to get professional STEM training for kindergarten through third grade teachers who would like to feel more comfortable teaching science and math to elementary school students.

The VC STEM Regional Network is part of a larger nationwide initiative known as the STEM Learning Ecosystems Initiative, a countrywide campaign devoted to creating STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning opportunities for students from pre-school to college.

This fall, Ventura County was named as a “STEM Learning Ecosystem,” which means the area was chosen as one of 27 regions considered ideal to pilot the national STEM initiative.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA -When they’re in the fourth grade, 66 percent of girls say they like math. By the time they enter college, the number drops to 18 percent.

Women hold fewer than 25 percent of the STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Math) jobs in the U.S. And only 18 percent of the engineers in the country are women.

CSU Channel Islands (CI) is participating in a nationwide effort to interest girls ages 12 to 18 in STEM careers by hosting an “Inspire Her Mind STEM Hackathon” Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Malibu Hall on campus.

The event is possible because of a grant from the Verizon Foundation, which is fueling a nationwide “Inspire Her Mind” STEM campaign.

The “Hackathon” is for girls ages 12 to 18 who will spend the day working with an adult female “role model”—many of whom are on the CI faculty.

According to Martin V. Smith School of Business & Economics Dean William P. Cordeiro, Ph.D., the event will have 10 tables with a computer and adult mentor seated at each table.

“Each table will have a computer and each team will develop a web page,” Cordeiro said. “Instead of having the mentors say ‘It’s important to go into STEM careers,’ they will be creating this project together.” The web page will be designed to interest other girls and young women in STEM careers.

Cordeiro organized the STEM Hackathon in partnership with United Way of Ventura County board member Jesus Torres, who works at Verizon; and Melissa Carlysle, CEO of Socihacks, a company that brings technology events to schools. The group funded the event with a grant from Verizon.

The girls and young women will also learn about “STEAM” careers, which includes “arts” in the STEM lineup.

“You don’t have to have the hard sciences in your background to go into a STEM career,” said Torres, Director of External Affairs for Verizon. “There are opportunities in creative marketing and business that also fall under STEM.”

CI Assistant Professor of Marketing, Susan Andrzejewski, Ph.D., will be showing the girls at her table how to find and appeal to the right target market for their web site, which will include digital arts.

“My background in marketing leads me to appreciate how social media and online graphic systems can be used to reach young women who might be interested in STEM,” Andrzejewski said.

Blackstock Junior High School Principal Tom Beneke is well aware of the statistics when it comes to girls and STEM, which is why he is bussing about 40 seventh and eighth grade girls to Saturday’s event.

“Four out of five of our science teachers are female, so they understand the struggle to get young women in science and technology,” he said. “They understand the importance of encouraging our young women of color and our young women in poverty. Education is a way to advance ourselves, our families and our communities.”

Having come from humble roots in Appalachia herself, Carlysle is especially interested in giving young girls the sort of exposure she got to education and a world outside of her own.

“When you’re a first generation college student, you don’t have a whole lot of resources,” Carlysle said. “In this county in particular, there is a huge need to engage kids and teach them 21st century skills.”

The event is sold out, but if you want to get on the waiting list or on the subscriber list for upcoming events, click on: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/verizons-inspire-her-mind-stemsteam-hackath....

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA - Educators, counselors and others who help high school students who need financial aid will be guided through the application process during a free workshop Saturday, Oct. 17 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at CSU Channel Islands (CI).

Representatives from the California Student Aid Commission will discuss the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which helps low-income high school seniors with money for college.

“There are many changes to FAFSA that are occurring over the next two years,” said Melissa Remotti, Director of Special Projects & Operations for CI’s Office of the President. “New processes will impact millions of students across the U.S. We want to provide our counselors and professionals the tools to help them guide students and families in Ventura County through the application process.”

The workshop is being coordinated through the Ventura County P-20 Council, a network of educators, businesses, parents, community leaders and others interested in improving the educational experience for all Ventura County students from pre-school through college. CI President Richard Rush chairs the council.

Ventura County P-20 Council Project Coordinator Richard Duarte, who is in charge of the event, said this workshop is geared toward teachers, counselors and members of non-profit agencies who help parents or high school seniors to fill out FAFSA forms.

“This workshop is not geared specifically toward parents. It’s not going to be in Spanish,” Duarte said. “But we do plan a site-specific event for parents in the future.”

The workshop will also cover the implications of the DREAM Act, and Cal Grants, state grants that are available to legal residents of California that meet certain eligibility requirements.

Because of the DREAM Act, which created a path to U.S. citizenship for qualified undocumented youth, there are also grants available for students wishing to pursue a college education.

Completing the form correctly, meeting deadlines and providing the necessary letters of recommendation, proof of income and other documentation is critical, Duarte said.
“That deadline is extremely important,” Duarte said. “Also, parents must have access and the ability to go online.”

One of the greatest challenges students’ face in higher education is being denied financial help because of a form that was not filled out accurately, Duarte said. He hopes the workshop will demystify the process and clear the way for all deserving high school seniors to pursue higher education.

Parking is free to participants. Follow signage once you enter the campus. To register, visit: http://go.csuci.edu/freefafsaworkshop.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will accept applications from new students for the fall 2016 term during the months of October and November. The application period ends at midnight on Monday, Nov. 30.

High school seniors, community college transfer students and others are advised to apply early and must apply by visiting www.csumentor.edu to complete the online application. CSUMentor also offers detailed information about the CSU system and campuses, admission requirements and financial aid.

CI is one of the fastest-growing universities in the nation and for fall 2016 projects an enrollment of 6,707 students as well as continued growth of approximately 500 new students each year.

The Admissions office is hosting a number of campus preview days for prospective students. Guests will receive information regarding the admission and application process, financial aid, campus life, and can partake in a campus tour. Visit go.csuci.edu/preview for additional details.

Midway between Santa Barbara and Los Angeles and minutes from the Pacific Ocean, CI is nestled in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. Established in 2002 as the newest of the 23 CSUs, CI offers a uniquely friendly, scenic and innovative public campus with 24 undergraduate degree programs, six graduate degrees, and a wide variety of teaching and service credential programs. For more information, visit www.csuci.edu or contact the CI Admissions & Recruitment office at admissions@csuci.edu or 805-437-8520.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

MOORPARK, CA – Moorpark College President Luis Sanchez has announced the appointment of David Mirisch as the new Executive Director of the Moorpark College Foundation. David Mirisch has helped produce over 2,500 fundraising events for organizations throughout the United States and in seven foreign countries, while in the process raising over $35,000,000. Local organizations for which he has recently worked include Conejo Recreation & Park District, Center4SpecialNeeds, Assisted Home Health & Hospice Foundation, and the Ventura County Animal Services Adoption Center in Camarillo. He is also a member of the Mirisch motion picture family that is well known for producing 72 motion pictures that have garnered 24 Academy Awards in various categories, including three Best Picture Awards. “The Board of Trustees is pleased to have David Mirisch join the Ventura County Community College District and looks forward to working with him as the Moorpark College Foundation continues to support the success of our students,” said District Chancellor Bernard Luskin.

 
Cindy Blatt, Martha Richardson and Scott Beylik participated in the Rotary Dictionary Project.
Cindy Blatt, Martha Richardson and Scott Beylik participated in the Rotary Dictionary Project.
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The Rotary Club of Fillmore participated in a Dictionary Project last week. This is a project that has been repeated for about 20 years. Several members visited all five elementary schools, in our district and presented a dictionary to each third grade student and teacher. In total there were 13 classrooms. After presenting the dictionaries the members spent a few minutes pointing out some interesting pages in the book and having the students look them up. They enjoyed the chance to get familiar with their dictionary. The Club also donated a few dictionaries to the Piru School Library, the Boy's & Girls Club and One Step Al A Vez.. 384 dictionaries were handed out this year.

 

 
Fillmore High School Freshmen Orientation included meeting with a Senior mentor. The day also included TRL speaker Derek Emery conducting a training, and Freshman registration. The incoming students were given a tour of the campus and classrooms.
Fillmore High School Freshmen Orientation included meeting with a Senior mentor. The day also included TRL speaker Derek Emery conducting a training, and Freshman registration. The incoming students were given a tour of the campus and classrooms.
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TRL program presented

TRL is our freshmen transition program where seniors and juniors mentor incoming freshmen for the entire year. We have put together a freshmen orientation program that goes beyond one day. At the heart of this program are successful upper classmen who mentors your freshmen, these mentors are called ambassadors. What I found in other freshmen transition programs is that most of their mentors are chosen based on achievements, both academic and athletic, but the freshmen who are mentored are not always that type of student, so it becomes hard for the mentee to connect with the mentor, and follow their actions.

What freshmen desire in a mentor is someone they can connect with, a peer that can lead them and know where they are coming from. To be an ambassador for TRL the student should be a leader that has credible relationships on campus, empowers students to do what’s right, challenges their own attitude, and leads by example. The TRL program gives the advisor and the ambassadors the ownership to customize the program to fit their school needs.

Keith Hawkins will train your ambassadors and advisor’s for a full day before your freshmen orientation. Most of the training focuses on the ambassador / freshmen relationship and the advisor’s roll as a TRL program director. Your advisor and ambassadors will be given the necessary tools to face the challenging, but rewarding school year. Your freshmen will benefit from having a mentor that will listen, lead, challenge, and help them become successful students at your school.

Derek Emery will be the only one who will conduct your training and TRL day. Keith has been training, organizing, speaking at freshmen orientations across the country for the past 20 years, and is considered one of the most knowledgeable orientation consultant in our country and will exclusively be there to help your freshmen program thrive and create a process that can be life changing for your students.

 

Camarillo, CA - Actress Nicole Brown and U.S. Astronaut Leland Melvin are the keynote speakers at an unprecedented teachers' summit taking place on the CSU Channel Islands (CI) campus July 31.

CI is one of 33 locations across California that will be hosting the "Better Together California Teachers Summit 2015," a one-day opportunity for all PreK through 12 teachers and teacher candidates to network, brainstorm, learn and share classroom practices.

The event is expected to draw about 20,000 teachers and teacher candidates around the state with about 250 gathering at the CI campus. Sixteen of the 33 locations hosting the statewide event are CSU campuses.

"First and foremost it gives teachers a chance to come together and share and have spontaneous conversations about their craft when they're relaxed during the summer," said Dianne Wilson-Graham, Executive Director of the California Physical Education—Health Project. "They'll be listening to other teachers' best practices and inspiring stories."

There are keynote speakers, but largely, the 8 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. conference is going to follow the fluid "EdCamp" model, an educator-specific conference model developed in 2009 by teachers in Philadelphia, Pa.

Unlike a regular conference set up months in advance, this "un-conference" doesn't have an agenda set up until the start of the event.

Instead of one person standing in front of the room and talking for an hour, educators will be encouraged to develop group discussions. Participants will then gravitate toward the session that most interests them.

Organizers have selected certain people to give "EDtalks," which are funny, poignant or informative stories designed to act catalysts for each spontaneous session.

Redwood Middle School teacher Elizabeth Dixon, who earned her Master's degree in Educational Leadership at CI, has been tapped to tell a story about the joy of teaching. She said it was one of the easiest homework assignments she's ever had.

"Kids are so inspiring, they will try anything," Dixon said of the age group she teaches at the Thousand Oaks middle school. "They are invincible right now, fearless."

Underscoring the talks will be stories about the most effective methods teachers' have used to teach the new California Standards.

"We have all the resources between us to be effective for our students," she said. "To give them enough challenge to unsettle them, but also to give them enough confidence to meet that challenge."

The keynote speakers are both advocates for education.

Nicole Brown, best-known for her role on NBC's "Community," recently joined talk show host Stephen Colbert with an initiative to fund education projects in South Carolina.

Leland Melvin, a football player turned NASA astronaut, exemplifies the galaxy of possibilities for someone with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) education.

Melvin has served as co-chair of the White House task force charged with developing the nation's five-year STEM education plan. He also serves on the International Space Education Board, a global collaboration dedicated to learning about space.

The one-of-a-kind free summit is sponsored by the California State University (CSU) system; the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU); and the New Teacher Center, a national non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening the practice of beginning teachers.

The free conference is almost full, but teachers can register for any remaining spots at www.CATeachersSummit.com and follow #CATeachersSummit for up-to-date information.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) recently received approval from the Western Association for Schools and Colleges (WASC) for its first doctoral program, a Doctorate of Education or Ed.D. WASC is one of six regional college and university accrediting associations in the United States.

CI developed the Collaborative Online Doctorate in Educational Leadership (CODEL) program in partnership with CSU Fresno.

Students wishing to pursue an Ed.D. through the CODEL program, which includes the options of P-12 or higher education leadership, can begin in summer of 2016. The 60-unit program will take three years and include a dissertation.

"This step allows us to keep pace with the needs of our educational community," said CI President Richard R. Rush. "There is significant demand for qualified teachers and administrators in our area. We look forward to the day when we graduate our first cohort of doctoral students."

Associate Professor of Education Kaia Tollefson, Ph.D., one of the co-directors of the new Ed.D. program, is pleased to see a public option for those wishing to pursue doctoral studies in education in Ventura County.

"In order for us to be effective in promoting and building the public good, we have to have publicly-supported education at every level of the system," Tollefson said. "Supporting access to excellent educational opportunities for students at every level is fundamental to the public good."

A high quality, online doctoral program at a public university expands access and opportunity, making a doctorate in P-12 and higher education leadership a more feasible and affordable option for qualified applicants, she said.

The new doctoral program adds to the momentum that CI's School of Education has already achieved at the credential and graduate levels of study in Educational Leadership.

Of the most recent cohort of students who graduated from CI's Masters in Education and Administrative Services Credential program in spring 2015, six of 15 have already been offered jobs in school administration in Ventura County. Three are in the Hueneme School District; one is in the Pleasant Valley School District; one is in Fillmore; and one is in Simi Valley.

Tim Rummel, Ph.D., Program Coordinator for the Master's in Educational Leadership, says he believes the success of the program lies in a mix of faculty expertise and lecturers from the educational community who are working with talented and motivated students.

"Exceptional educators are choosing our program and the program has a strong faculty of practicing school administrators who are providing outstanding preparation for school
Leadership," Rummel said.

Merilyn Buchanan, Ph.D., Interim Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Director of the School of Education for the 2015-2016 academic year, will oversee the program's implementation and the launching of its first cohort in June of 2016.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/

 
PHOTOS COURTESY BOB CRUM

 

Camarillo, CA - The public is invited to help CSU Channel Islands (CI) and the City of Camarillo and the Camarillo Chamber of Commerce welcome Special Olympics athletes, coaches and ambassadors set to arrive on the CI campus Tuesday, July 21 at 2:30 p.m.

Camarillo is one of about 100 host cities in Southern California who are treating the 7,000 Special Olympics athletes and their support teams to a taste of Southern California culture before the 2015 Special Olympics World Summer Games, which begin on Saturday, July 25.

“Host towns are important because they help promote awareness and it gives the athletes a chance to adjust to the time change and the climate after flying across the world,” said Maureen Fedail, Director of Host Towns for Special Olympics World Summer Games Los Angeles 2015. “With the Southern California footprint from San Diego to San Luis Obispo, this gives all the Southern California communities a chance to welcome these athletes and partake in this historic, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.”

Camarillo is hosting a total of 96 athletes, coaches and ambassadors from New Zealand and Saudi Arabia from July 21 to July 24. The 96 athletes, ambassadors and coaches from both countries will stay at CI’s residence halls.

“We are delighted and honored to host Special Olympics athletes at CSU Channel Islands,” said CI President Richard R. Rush. “We look forward to supporting these efforts and making friends for a lifetime.”

The four days will be packed with tours, cultural exchanges, good food and warm welcomes as Camarillo takes the world stage.

Three of the events are open to the public: the Arrival Celebration, a Thursday exhibition basketball game, and the Friday Departure Celebration.

The New Zealand athletes will arrive around 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 21. The delegation from Saudi Arabia will arrive later that evening.

The athletes and their delegations will arrive at CI’s Tree House Courtyard on Tuesday afternoon, where the community is invited to welcome the visitors and enjoy cookies and lemonade. Parking is free for the event; follow campus directional signs.

After the welcome celebration from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., the athletes and their delegations will settle into Santa Cruz Village, the residence hall where they will stay with the teams from Saudi Arabia.

At noon on Wednesday, July 22, the athletes will be picked up by Roadrunner Shuttle, one of many businesses offering their services for free for the athletes, and taken to the Camarillo Airport Museum where they will be treated to a lunch and tour of the museum by the Ventura County Ninety-Nines, a chapter of an international organization of women pilots.

After a lunch catered by Scofield Catering and Management, the athletes, coaches and support crews will hear from the Ninety-Nines; Ventura County Director of Airports Todd McNamee; California State Assemblymember Jacqui Irwin; Ventura County Supervisor Kathy Long; and Jason Barnes, a CI alumnus and representative from Congresswoman Julia Brownley’s office.

Then, there will be a fly-by of World War II-era aircraft flown by the Commemorative Air Force SoCal Wing; and demonstrations from the Ventura County Sheriff’s Helicopter Operations and the Ventura County Fire Department.

On Wednesday, the Special Olympics athletes will be guests for dinner at the Camarillo Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Because they need to be prepared for the Special Olympics, the athletes will train at the Camarillo Boys & Girls Club all week.

On Thursday, July 23, the athletes will break for an outdoor lunch courtesy of Camarillo’s CMA or “Client-Minded Agents,” an organization of Camarillo real estate agents.

Later that night, the public is invited to a Saudi Arabia versus New Zealand exhibition basketball game. Tipoff is at 7 p.m. at the Camarillo Boys & Girls Club at 1500 Temple Avenue. Parking is free and guests are asked to arrive by 6:30 p.m.

The public is welcome Friday morning, July 24, at the Departure Celebration, scheduled for 10 to 11 a.m. at CI’s Tree House Courtyard.

To attend the public events, visit: http://go.csuci.edu/SO2015

You can keep up with all the Camarillo Host Town events on Facebook’s “Host Town Camarillo” page.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA - The skills of 62 aspiring engineers will be put to the test July 10 at CSU Channel Islands (CI) when the high school students break bridges they constructed out of dry spaghetti.

From 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, July 10, the high school engineers will break their bridges in front of the John Spoor Broome Library on the CI campus to the cheers of family, friends, school and community leaders, and government officials.

The students will also receive awards for the successful completion of the Hueneme High School Academy of Engineering & Design Summer Bridge Programs at CI and Oxnard College. Students going into 11th grade attend pre-engineering classes at Oxnard College and 12th graders study engineering and physics on the CI campus with Associate Professor of Applied Physics Gregory Wood, Ph.D.

The spaghetti bridge project is the culmination of four weeks of university-level engineering instruction for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) students entering 12th grade at Hueneme High School. The ceremony gives the students a chance to show their families the skills they've learned from Wood.

"We're going to add a hook at the bottom of the bridge and hang a basket," said Hueneme High School student Jesus Escalante, 17, of Oxnard. "We're going to add water bottles to the basket and see which bridge can actually stand more."

The Hueneme High School Academy of Engineering & Design Bridge Program at CI is a joint effort of Hueneme High School, CI, and the Ventura County P-20 Council.

"This program gives students a chance to become comfortable in a four-year university environment," said CI President Richard Rush, who chairs the Ventura County P-20 Council. "We hope to encourage those interested in pursuing a degree in science, technology, engineering or math, as companies are in need of individuals with those specific skill sets."

The grant-supported program gives 12th graders a chance to prepare for college-level engineering courses by being part of an engineering academy during the school year, and getting immersed in college-level engineering and physics classes during the Summer Bridge program, which began in June.

"My passion has always been engineering," Escalante said. "I'm excited to go to college. My mom works in a bakery and my dad is a butcher. They're very supportive."

From 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday, the students take hands-on classes and hear from professional engineers. Fridays are for field trips to museums, universities and science-related sites.

"The real value is in the hands-on aspect of the classes. They're doing real world activities led by a university professor," said Richard Duarte, Program Coordinator for the Ventura County P-20 Council. "Many of these students come from homes where they are the first generation to go to college. This gives them an opportunity to attend class and see what college is like."

Wood uses the pasta bridge project and two other assignments to allow students to use basic engineering concepts of force, torque and material properties as they create working designs. "I think if it's an environment that's a bit playful, they'll be willing to take more risks and come up with an innovative design," Wood said.

The teams' first assignment was to design a mousetrap that will trap a ping pong ball and keep it in the enclosure, even when the trap is rattled vigorously.

The second project is an egg drop in which the teams are given one meter of thread, one meter of masking tape, two coffee filters, two sheets of paper and a two-story building.

They are told to build something that will keep an egg from breaking if dropped off a two-story building. The teams had to calculate such things as weight and velocity.

One team fashioned a cone that crumpled when it landed, softening the impact for the egg. Escalante's team had a different idea. "We built a parachute out of the coffee filter," he said.

As with any experiment, there are successes and missteps in the engineering process.

"I get eggs in bulk," Wood said.

The program has been gaining popularity each year with almost twice as many students signing up for this year's program as compared to last year, which had 35 students.

The Hueneme High School Academy of Engineering & Design Summer Bridge Program at CI is generously sponsored by The Harriet H. Samuelsson Foundation, Bank of America, and Umpqua Bank.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will receive a $25,000 rebate from the state's Commercial Turf Removal Program after replacing 28,000 square feet of turf with more drought-tolerant landscaping.

Workers began removing turf this week from specific areas in both the north and south parts of the campus.

CI Director of Facility Support Raudel Banuelos said grass that used to extend right up to some of the buildings on campus will be replaced with drought-tolerant plants and landscaping that retains the curb appeal of the campus.

The process is familiar to CI, which has been aggressively searching for ways to conserve water for years.

"We're pretty close to running 100 percent on recycled water," Banuelos said. "Now we're trying to reduce our use of recycled water. We have been doing this a long time. We're ahead of the curve."

According to CSU Energy and Sustainability Analyst Michael Clemson, who oversees conservation efforts on all 23 CSU campuses, CI has cut its potable water use by 40 percent from 2008 to 2013, but facilities and sustainability staff are still working hard to find other ways to cut back.

"We're doing everything we can," Banuelos said. "We want to be good stewards in this drought situation. Now we're evaluating flushing toilets with reclaimed rather than potable water."

In April of 2015, Governor Jerry Brown issued an executive order requiring the State Water Resources Control Board to reduce potable water use by 25 percent through February 2016. This is accomplished through water districts such as Camrosa Water District, which serves the CI campus.

The cost of irrigating one acre of lawn on campus with reclaimed water is $1,427.42 a year. Irrigating one acre of drought-resistant plants for a year will cost $203.98 a year, saving the campus $1,223.44 a year, or almost 86 percent.

While the facilities workers dig up the turf and replace it with colorful, drought-resistant plants, CI Associate Director of Infrastructure & Energy Jose Chanes works to find and apply for rebates through programs such as the Turf Removal Rebate Program and others under websites such as BeWaterWise.com and http://www.water.ca.gov.

Sustainability will always be a foremost consideration as the campus continues to grow.

"We continue to plan for future improvements that go hand-in-hand with our water conservation strategy," Chanes said.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/

 

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - California Lutheran University has received $2.28 million from the estate of an alumna’s parents to advance programs in three fields that were important to the family – ministry, science and education.

Darlene and Wilbert Carlson, Camarillo residents who died in 2013 and 2014 at the ages of 84 and 85, respectively, left $1.4 million to establish an endowed chair in youth and family ministry, $584,700 toward the construction of a new science building, $300,000 for a summer research program in chemistry and $40,000 for an endowed scholarship for aspiring teachers.

The $1.4 million gift provides an endowment to help pay the ongoing cost of a faculty member to lead the youth and family ministry specialization within the theology and Christian leadership degree program. The program, currently led by assistant professor of religion Colleen Windham-Hughes, was launched six years ago in response to demand for professionals to lead church programs. The Carlsons were charter members of Mount Cross Lutheran Church in Camarillo.

The science center donation will help the university eventually build a facility that will connect to the current Ahmanson Science Center. The new building will house additional labs and classrooms for the growing number of students studying biology, chemistry, environmental science and exercise science.

The $300,000 gift will enable Cal Lutheran to reach its goal of raising $1 million to establish an endowed John Stauffer Research Fellows Program in Chemical Sciences. The John Stauffer Charitable Trust pledged a challenge grant of $500,000, and the university has now raised the matching donations required. The endowment will provide fellowships to about 10 students each summer to conduct original research full time for eight weeks with mentoring from faculty. It will also cover travel costs for the students to present their research at professional conferences.

Will Carlson’s focus within the sciences was aerospace engineering. He graduated from the Northrop Institute of Technology and worked his way into upper management in the aerospace industry in the San Diego area. In 1967, he began working at Northrop Corp. in Newbury Park and the family moved to Camarillo. He retired as the manager of manufacturing and engineering in 1988. Darlene Carlson worked for an electronics manufacturing company and an aluminum production shop.

The final $40,000 will expand the Wilbert and Darlene Carlson Scholarship for students preparing to become teachers. The Carlsons established the scholarship in memory of their daughter Dee, who earned a bachelor’s degree from Cal Lutheran in 1978. The adult education administrator died suddenly in 2009 at the age of 52. The couple’s other child died at birth.