Mike Pace was recognized for his years of service to the Fillmore Unified School District. He will be leaving the district at the end of November. School Board President Virginia De la Piedra presented the plaque.
Mike Pace was recognized for his years of service to the Fillmore Unified School District. He will be leaving the district at the end of November. School Board President Virginia De la Piedra presented the plaque.
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Hello Fillmore and all of you from this great little town. I want to tell of the play I saw Sunday the 15th of November; The Rainmaker, at the Fillmore High School Drama room. It was written by N. Richard Nash and directed by Mr. Josh Overton, the Drama Teacher at Fillmore High School.

This year’s Drama Club play is one of the best I have seen at any level. The actors on stage were great. The crew did an awesome job with lighting, sound, mak up, and sets. The crew was Assistant Director and Sound Connie Quintana, Stage Manager Jose Rodriguez, Assistant Stage Manager Sean Riley, Lights Grailing Lowe-MacMahon, Props Kassie Chambers, Lisa Munoz, Jessica Givan, Set Crew Josh Baez and Gabby Munoz, Set Construction Josh Overton, Tim Overton, Benjamin Bradshaw, Shelly Schwarz, and the F.H.S. Drama Students. Without these great people there could never be a show.

The play is set in the early 1900’s, at a ranch that is in need of rain. The Curry Family is suffering because their cattle are dying off and are worried they will lose the ranch. Dillon Galarza plays the father H.C. Curry. He works hard to keep his family together. Blake Palacio plays the smart and serious son Noah Curry. He is the one who oversees the business of the ranch. Israel Brooks plays Jimmy Curry, the fun loving son who will make you laugh till it hurts. Rachel Rivera plays Lizzie Curry, the Daughter who will win your heart. Fatima Bazurto plays the Sheriff of the town, and she does a great job of it. Trysten Riddle plays File, the shy Deputy Sheriff who needs to move on in life. And last but not least Nicholas Posada plays Bill Starbuck, The Rainmaker, the con artist with a big heart.

I do not want to give the whole play away, and I won’t! What I am asking you to do is this, go see the play. It is only $7. Most of you can find that in the sofa at home or you saved up because you boycotted Starbucks for a day because of the red cups. This will be better than any movie you will see this year, except maybe Star Wars. If Mr. Overton had their budget it could be better than that too.

The actors will blow you away with their talents and love for the arts. Mr. Overton dreams of one day having a building to showcase the arts in Fillmore; a building where people can put on a play, where the High School Bands can play, where an artist can show their art. This town is filled with so many talented people, young and old, we should be able to make this happen.

The Rainmaker will have three more shows for you Fillmore; Friday November 20th, Saturday the 21st both at seven p.m. and closing day is Sunday the 22nd at 2 p.m. The play will be at the Drama Room on 2nd Street at Fillmore High School. Tickets are only $7 each for two hours of live entertainment. You can get your tickets at Fillmore High School in advance or if you are lucky at the door. Seating is comfortable and limited, so if I was you, I would get my tickets now.

So Fillmore come out and be a part of this great play. Let the actors entertain you. Get away from the hustle and bustle of life. Do not forget to bring a couple of dollars for a soda, and some candy at the snack bar. It is something that you will enjoy and you will be helping out the Drama Program of Fillmore High School. This show was so good that right after the play was over it was raining in Fillmore on Sunday, and you all know we needed that. Aw the magic of Theater! Enjoy Fillmore!!

 


 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) and three other Hispanic-Serving Institutions in California will share a $750,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to encourage women to enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers.

Over the next five years, CI; University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB); University of California, Merced; and San Diego State University will use the grant to establish the Center for Research, Excellence and Diversity in Team Science (CREDITS), a research and training program designed to encourage more women, especially women of color, to enter STEM disciplines.

To that end, CI and the three other founding members of the initiative will organize what are known as “team science retreats” that target female faculty members and researchers with a special focus on minority women who do not have enough representation in the STEM disciplines. “Team science” is defined as interdisciplinary, collaborative research among two or more scientists.

Beginning in January of 2016, representatives from the four universities will get together to work out the details of the team science retreats. The group of representatives will also create workshops that will study the elements that diversity brings to collaborative scientific research.

The group of university representatives will also create training programs for women and people of color on how to be team leaders, how to create effective teams, and how to be good team members.

The NSF grant places UCSB at the helm of the cooperative project as the university already conducts team science retreats within the University of California (UC) system.

“The idea is to take a program that has been successful at one institution and scale it to meet the needs of different types of institutions,” said lead principal investigator Barbara Endemano Walker, a director of research development at UCSB’s Office of Research. “So we took the UC team science retreat model that we already developed in the UC system and added our sister Cal State universities to the mix, this time focusing on Hispanic-Serving Institutions.”

Co-Principal Investigator and Director of Hispanic-Serving Institution Initiatives, Amanda Quintero, Ph.D. said the project is a natural fit with CI because it promotes diversity and collaboration in STEM research.

“The UC-CSU team science retreats will provide our female faculty in STEM disciplines with opportunities to build professional networks in their disciplines and build strong research collaborations through cross-institutional partnerships,” she said.

CI Dean of Arts & Sciences Karen Carey, Ph.D., said the CI campus is rich with potential STEM candidates.

“On our campus we’re 65 percent women,” Carey said. “Women are the ones who are going to school. And as a Hispanic-Serving Institution, the women here are predominately Hispanic. We know they can do it. We just have to encourage and help them be successful.” Carey believes this grant will help close gender and ethnic disparities in STEM occupations in the state, a trend she hopes to ultimately see across the nation.

“The project has strong potential to make lasting change not just in the lives of the faculty members who participate, but in the institutions and STEM disciplines themselves as it creates systemic change that will support women in STEM for many years to come,” Carey said.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 


 

The Fillmore High School Band and Colorguard, aka the Flashes Regiment, took first place in the 2A Green division in all three categories (band, colorguard and percussion) at the Simi Valley High School Field Competition on Sat. Oct. 24. It was a hot and windy day with twenty three bands participating in the competition. Field show competitive divisions are determined by the number of musicians in each group.

Our Fillmore students start learning their field show in the summer before the school year begins. Weeks are spent learning the complex field moves that accompany the music. Every effort is made to perfect the details and create a theme-based show. This year the show is entitled “Wild” and features music and colorguard costuming to match. Some spectators are not familiar with theme-based field shows since the most commonly seen shows are college football bands that tend to focus on school themes. Field show competitions feature shows that are based on creative musical and visual details. Students are judged not only on their precision and execution of details but also on their ability to convey the theme of their show to the audience. The judging panel consists of three music judges, two visual, one percussion and one colorguard. Each judge provides a critique of the group’s show which can last between seven and eleven minutes. The judges provide written and recorded detailed comments for each band to analyze and further improve their show. The Flashes Regiment will participate at the Oxnard High School Field Tournament on Nov. 7 and the Granada Hills Charter High School Field Competition on Nov. 12.

 


 

 


 
Program has awarded $20 million to 1,000 students

THOUSAND OAKS, CA - California Lutheran University is expanding its popular Public Price Promise program to match the costs of a sixth University of California campus. The scholarship program provides a private school education at a public school price.

The Public Price Promise scholarship now will be available to freshmen and transfer students entering Cal Lutheran in the 2016-2017 year who were also accepted to UC Irvine. The program will continue to be available to Cal Lutheran students who were also admitted to UC San Diego, UCLA, UC Santa Barbara, UC Davis or UC Berkeley.

These students can attend Cal Lutheran for the cost of attending a UC. For the 2015-2016 year, the value of the scholarship is $23,424. The amount is slightly more than the difference in the tuition, fees, books and living expenses for full-time residential students attending Cal Lutheran, which is currently $57,641, and the average price of attending the UC colleges, which is $34,218. The 2016-2017 scholarship award amount will be announced in spring after the universities have set their tuition and fees.

Since the program’s inception in 2008, 1118 students have received more than $20 million in scholarships. The number of students entering Cal Lutheran under the program each year has increased more than sixfold from 2008. This fall, 152 new Public Price Promise scholarship recipients began classes.

The program was designed to show students who thought they could only afford a public university that an education at a private school with smaller class sizes and lower faculty-student ratios was within reach. It has led other universities to adopt similar programs.

The Public Price Promise is open to all students applying for the traditional undergraduate and Bachelor’s Degree for Professionals programs. It has no income requirements and it is open to out-of-state and international students as well. Students can also receive federal, state and institutional aid based on need to further reduce the cost.

If students make satisfactory academic progress and meet GPA requirements, they can renew the scholarship each year. The award amount increases if the difference in the cost of attending Cal Lutheran and a UC goes up. Students entering as freshmen can renew the scholarship for four years, and transfer students can receive the scholarship for a maximum of two years depending on their grade level at enrollment.

Of the students receiving the Public Price Promise scholarship this year, 33 percent are first-generation college students and 29 percent identify themselves as Latino.

Cal Lutheran is a selective university based in Thousand Oaks, California, with additional locations in Woodland Hills, Westlake Village, Oxnard, Santa Maria and Berkeley. With an enrollment of 4,100 students, Cal Lutheran offers undergraduate and graduate programs through its College of Arts and Sciences, School of Management, Graduate School of Education, Graduate School of Psychology and Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. Members of the Cal Lutheran student body come from across the nation and around the world and represent a diversity of faiths and cultures.

For more information, visit CalLutheran.edu/promise or contact the Office of Undergraduate Admission at 805-493-3135 or admissions@callutheran.edu.

 
 
The Mt. Vista School Readers and Writers of the Month are as follows: 2nd Grade: Aurora Arellano, Gary Boon,
Isaac Cervantes, Mia Barron, Abe DeLa Cruz and Kara Albanez.
The Mt. Vista School Readers and Writers of the Month are as follows: 2nd Grade: Aurora Arellano, Gary Boon, Isaac Cervantes, Mia Barron, Abe DeLa Cruz and Kara Albanez.
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3rd Grade: Diego Rivera, Adrian Fuentes, Justin Contreras, Salvador Estrada, David Recendez, Sofia Avalos, Aleena Sanchez and Alexa Martinez.
3rd Grade: Diego Rivera, Adrian Fuentes, Justin Contreras, Salvador Estrada, David Recendez, Sofia Avalos, Aleena Sanchez and Alexa Martinez.
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4th Grade: Leslie Ortiz, Juan Zaragoza, Caleb Munoz, Emma Boon, Aliyah Lefferts and Nuviah Vega (not pictured).
4th Grade: Leslie Ortiz, Juan Zaragoza, Caleb Munoz, Emma Boon, Aliyah Lefferts and Nuviah Vega (not pictured).
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5th Grade: Jazmin Aguirre, Jonathan Castillo, Diego Alcaraz, Jeanette Kirkpatrick, Alex Huchin, Ricardo Vasquez, Ana Romero and Isabella Minjares.
5th Grade: Jazmin Aguirre, Jonathan Castillo, Diego Alcaraz, Jeanette Kirkpatrick, Alex Huchin, Ricardo Vasquez, Ana Romero and Isabella Minjares.
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Camarillo, CA - Slime, banana pianos and the ever-popular screaming Gummi bears will be among more than 80 exploding, oozing, glowing and just plain fascinating hands-on science activities at CSU Channel Islands (CI)’s Seventh Annual Science Carnival.

Kids from kindergarten through eighth grade and their families are welcome to the free Halloween-themed Science Carnival, although Professor of Chemistry Philip Hampton, Ph.D., who organizes the carnival every year, says he has a broad definition of “kid.”

“I’m a kid myself,” he said. “We welcome ‘kids’ from one to 100 years old.”

This year’s Science Carnival will be held Saturday, Oct. 24 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Thurgood Marshall Elementary School at 2900 Thurgood Marshall Drive in Oxnard. Attendance at the event has increased more than tenfold since it began in 2009 with about 250 people in attendance. Hampton started the carnival with the help of two students.

Last year, 3,200 children and adult “kids” showed up to see the mirth and magic behind science.

“I just want kids to see the fun in science,” Hampton said. “I just want them to engage in a night of science and say ‘Hey! I think I can do science!’”

The first carnival had 30 displays compared with this year, which will boast 83 demonstrations.

Like Disneyland, this year’s carnival has themed areas including: Imagination Zone; Tomorrowland; Wonderland; Carnival Zone; Launch Zone; Discovery Zone; Pyro Zone and the Sensation Zone.

Each themed area will house science demonstrations consistent with the name. For example, Imagination Zone will offer kids the chance to make their own lip balm, perfume and the ever-popular “make your own slime” station.

And yes, parents, your junior scientists get to take the slime home with them.

“It’s one of the kids’ favorite things,” Hampton said. “It’s kind of disgusting and that’s exactly what kids like in science.”

Another crowd-pleaser will be the Pyro Zone, where various experiments explode safely onstage, including self-carving pumpkins that explode into Jack-o-Lanterns and the Propane Mamba, which involves bubbles that catch fire on volunteers’ hands when the bubbles are ignited.

The Pyro Zone is also where guests will see the combustion of sucrose, better-known as the Screaming Gummi Bear.

The Science Carnival has also enjoyed new partners and more collaboration each year. This year the carnival welcomes the Gull Wings Children’s Museum, First Five of Ventura County, and the Discovery Center. .

Beneath all the slime and explosions is a purpose, Hampton said. Exposing students to the wonders of science aligns with the Ventura County STEM Regional Network’s goals.
VC STEM is a leadership hub for businesses, schools, parent organizations and many other entities interested in attracting students to STEM careers and making STEM education the best it can be in Ventura County.

This year, the carnival is drawing in volunteers from some of the science and teaching academies in the Oxnard Union High School District.

The Science Carnival is funded in part through CI’s Project ACCESO, a U.S. Department of Education Hispanic-Serving Institution grant that promotes STEM learning. Funding also comes from the California Los Padres Section of the American Chemical Society.

Free parking is available at the elementary school and at nearby Oxnard High School but is somewhat limited. We encourage you to come early and look for message signs with information about parking. Kids are encouraged to wear their Halloween costumes! Food truck on site.

For more: http://www.csuci.edu/sciencecarnival.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

The Fillmore High School Parent Teacher Organization will meet on, Wednesday, October 21, 2015 at 6:30 PM at the high school, front office Conference Room. Please join us and have a say in the future of your child’s high school experience.

Board meetings are one hour and we stick to the Agenda. Public Comment allows anyone three minutes to voice opinions or offer suggestions for the board to take under consideration. We’d love to hear from you.

Parental involvement is an important aspect to your children’s success in school. Becoming a PTO volunteer or board member is a great way to be involved! We are currently accepting nominations for PTO Secretary. If you or someone you know might be interested, please submit your nominations at or prior to the PTO meeting on October 21, 2015.

You may submit written nominations to board members, Mike Van De Mheen, Danielle Quintana, Debbie Galarza, or Rosa Garcia or to Anna Morielli or Barbara Lemons in the high school office prior to the meeting. Written nominations should include the nominee’s name and contact information so that we can verify candidacy.

For further information, please visit our Facebook page at: Fillmore High PTO

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will host a celebration of the official launch of the Ventura County STEM Regional Network beginning at 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 23 at the CI Boating Center at the Channel Islands Harbor.

“This is sort of a coming-out party for our VC STEM network,” explained VC STEM Planning Director Philip Hampton, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry at CI. “We’ve spent almost a year planning. Now we move from the ideation stage to the action stage.”

The VC STEM Network is a leadership hub for regional companies, universities, government agencies, parks, schools, museums and a host of other local organizations working together to improve educational outcomes in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) for all students throughout Ventura County.

VC STEM was made possible by a $75,000 grant awarded at the end of 2014 by the Amgen Foundation, the charitable arm of the Thousand Oaks biotechnology company.

Hampton put together the grant proposal and has since headed a steering committee that put together another grant to further benefit the network.

VC STEM was launched under the Ventura County P-20 Council, a group of like-minded partners from education, business, parent organizations and other community agencies interested in making Ventura County’s educational system the best it can be. The P-20 Council is chaired by CI President Richard R. Rush.

Legislators, educators and P-20 councilmembers are among those invited to the VC STEM launch, which will begin with demonstrations of partnerships including crowd-pleasing exhibits from Hampton’s popular Science Carnival, which is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 24 at Thurgood Marshall Elementary School in Oxnard.

“I may bring the banana piano or maybe have Oreos or saltines dipped in liquid nitrogen,” Hampton said.

When the VC STEM network gets down to work, members will concentrate on three areas: 1) Early STEM learning; 2) STEM expanded learning; and 3) STEM professional learning for educators.

Early STEM will involve a look at how to stimulate kids’ interest in science from birth to Grade 3, and ways to introduce math at an early age.

STEM expanded learning is about science outside of the classroom, which may include science or technology clubs kids attend after school.

“It’s a powerful area where you can introduce science in an informal setting,” Hampton said. “Like computers and 3-D printing.”

The third area of concentration will concern ways to get professional STEM training for kindergarten through third grade teachers who would like to feel more comfortable teaching science and math to elementary school students.

The VC STEM Regional Network is part of a larger nationwide initiative known as the STEM Learning Ecosystems Initiative, a countrywide campaign devoted to creating STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning opportunities for students from pre-school to college.

This fall, Ventura County was named as a “STEM Learning Ecosystem,” which means the area was chosen as one of 27 regions considered ideal to pilot the national STEM initiative.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA -When they’re in the fourth grade, 66 percent of girls say they like math. By the time they enter college, the number drops to 18 percent.

Women hold fewer than 25 percent of the STEM (Science, Technology Engineering and Math) jobs in the U.S. And only 18 percent of the engineers in the country are women.

CSU Channel Islands (CI) is participating in a nationwide effort to interest girls ages 12 to 18 in STEM careers by hosting an “Inspire Her Mind STEM Hackathon” Oct. 10 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Malibu Hall on campus.

The event is possible because of a grant from the Verizon Foundation, which is fueling a nationwide “Inspire Her Mind” STEM campaign.

The “Hackathon” is for girls ages 12 to 18 who will spend the day working with an adult female “role model”—many of whom are on the CI faculty.

According to Martin V. Smith School of Business & Economics Dean William P. Cordeiro, Ph.D., the event will have 10 tables with a computer and adult mentor seated at each table.

“Each table will have a computer and each team will develop a web page,” Cordeiro said. “Instead of having the mentors say ‘It’s important to go into STEM careers,’ they will be creating this project together.” The web page will be designed to interest other girls and young women in STEM careers.

Cordeiro organized the STEM Hackathon in partnership with United Way of Ventura County board member Jesus Torres, who works at Verizon; and Melissa Carlysle, CEO of Socihacks, a company that brings technology events to schools. The group funded the event with a grant from Verizon.

The girls and young women will also learn about “STEAM” careers, which includes “arts” in the STEM lineup.

“You don’t have to have the hard sciences in your background to go into a STEM career,” said Torres, Director of External Affairs for Verizon. “There are opportunities in creative marketing and business that also fall under STEM.”

CI Assistant Professor of Marketing, Susan Andrzejewski, Ph.D., will be showing the girls at her table how to find and appeal to the right target market for their web site, which will include digital arts.

“My background in marketing leads me to appreciate how social media and online graphic systems can be used to reach young women who might be interested in STEM,” Andrzejewski said.

Blackstock Junior High School Principal Tom Beneke is well aware of the statistics when it comes to girls and STEM, which is why he is bussing about 40 seventh and eighth grade girls to Saturday’s event.

“Four out of five of our science teachers are female, so they understand the struggle to get young women in science and technology,” he said. “They understand the importance of encouraging our young women of color and our young women in poverty. Education is a way to advance ourselves, our families and our communities.”

Having come from humble roots in Appalachia herself, Carlysle is especially interested in giving young girls the sort of exposure she got to education and a world outside of her own.

“When you’re a first generation college student, you don’t have a whole lot of resources,” Carlysle said. “In this county in particular, there is a huge need to engage kids and teach them 21st century skills.”

The event is sold out, but if you want to get on the waiting list or on the subscriber list for upcoming events, click on: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/verizons-inspire-her-mind-stemsteam-hackath....

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA - Educators, counselors and others who help high school students who need financial aid will be guided through the application process during a free workshop Saturday, Oct. 17 from 8:30 a.m. to noon at CSU Channel Islands (CI).

Representatives from the California Student Aid Commission will discuss the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which helps low-income high school seniors with money for college.

“There are many changes to FAFSA that are occurring over the next two years,” said Melissa Remotti, Director of Special Projects & Operations for CI’s Office of the President. “New processes will impact millions of students across the U.S. We want to provide our counselors and professionals the tools to help them guide students and families in Ventura County through the application process.”

The workshop is being coordinated through the Ventura County P-20 Council, a network of educators, businesses, parents, community leaders and others interested in improving the educational experience for all Ventura County students from pre-school through college. CI President Richard Rush chairs the council.

Ventura County P-20 Council Project Coordinator Richard Duarte, who is in charge of the event, said this workshop is geared toward teachers, counselors and members of non-profit agencies who help parents or high school seniors to fill out FAFSA forms.

“This workshop is not geared specifically toward parents. It’s not going to be in Spanish,” Duarte said. “But we do plan a site-specific event for parents in the future.”

The workshop will also cover the implications of the DREAM Act, and Cal Grants, state grants that are available to legal residents of California that meet certain eligibility requirements.

Because of the DREAM Act, which created a path to U.S. citizenship for qualified undocumented youth, there are also grants available for students wishing to pursue a college education.

Completing the form correctly, meeting deadlines and providing the necessary letters of recommendation, proof of income and other documentation is critical, Duarte said.
“That deadline is extremely important,” Duarte said. “Also, parents must have access and the ability to go online.”

One of the greatest challenges students’ face in higher education is being denied financial help because of a form that was not filled out accurately, Duarte said. He hopes the workshop will demystify the process and clear the way for all deserving high school seniors to pursue higher education.

Parking is free to participants. Follow signage once you enter the campus. To register, visit: http://go.csuci.edu/freefafsaworkshop.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will accept applications from new students for the fall 2016 term during the months of October and November. The application period ends at midnight on Monday, Nov. 30.

High school seniors, community college transfer students and others are advised to apply early and must apply by visiting www.csumentor.edu to complete the online application. CSUMentor also offers detailed information about the CSU system and campuses, admission requirements and financial aid.

CI is one of the fastest-growing universities in the nation and for fall 2016 projects an enrollment of 6,707 students as well as continued growth of approximately 500 new students each year.

The Admissions office is hosting a number of campus preview days for prospective students. Guests will receive information regarding the admission and application process, financial aid, campus life, and can partake in a campus tour. Visit go.csuci.edu/preview for additional details.

Midway between Santa Barbara and Los Angeles and minutes from the Pacific Ocean, CI is nestled in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. Established in 2002 as the newest of the 23 CSUs, CI offers a uniquely friendly, scenic and innovative public campus with 24 undergraduate degree programs, six graduate degrees, and a wide variety of teaching and service credential programs. For more information, visit www.csuci.edu or contact the CI Admissions & Recruitment office at admissions@csuci.edu or 805-437-8520.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI’s Social Media.

 

MOORPARK, CA – Moorpark College President Luis Sanchez has announced the appointment of David Mirisch as the new Executive Director of the Moorpark College Foundation. David Mirisch has helped produce over 2,500 fundraising events for organizations throughout the United States and in seven foreign countries, while in the process raising over $35,000,000. Local organizations for which he has recently worked include Conejo Recreation & Park District, Center4SpecialNeeds, Assisted Home Health & Hospice Foundation, and the Ventura County Animal Services Adoption Center in Camarillo. He is also a member of the Mirisch motion picture family that is well known for producing 72 motion pictures that have garnered 24 Academy Awards in various categories, including three Best Picture Awards. “The Board of Trustees is pleased to have David Mirisch join the Ventura County Community College District and looks forward to working with him as the Moorpark College Foundation continues to support the success of our students,” said District Chancellor Bernard Luskin.

 
Cindy Blatt, Martha Richardson and Scott Beylik participated in the Rotary Dictionary Project.
Cindy Blatt, Martha Richardson and Scott Beylik participated in the Rotary Dictionary Project.
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The Rotary Club of Fillmore participated in a Dictionary Project last week. This is a project that has been repeated for about 20 years. Several members visited all five elementary schools, in our district and presented a dictionary to each third grade student and teacher. In total there were 13 classrooms. After presenting the dictionaries the members spent a few minutes pointing out some interesting pages in the book and having the students look them up. They enjoyed the chance to get familiar with their dictionary. The Club also donated a few dictionaries to the Piru School Library, the Boy's & Girls Club and One Step Al A Vez.. 384 dictionaries were handed out this year.

 

 
Fillmore High School Freshmen Orientation included meeting with a Senior mentor. The day also included TRL speaker Derek Emery conducting a training, and Freshman registration. The incoming students were given a tour of the campus and classrooms.
Fillmore High School Freshmen Orientation included meeting with a Senior mentor. The day also included TRL speaker Derek Emery conducting a training, and Freshman registration. The incoming students were given a tour of the campus and classrooms.
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TRL program presented

TRL is our freshmen transition program where seniors and juniors mentor incoming freshmen for the entire year. We have put together a freshmen orientation program that goes beyond one day. At the heart of this program are successful upper classmen who mentors your freshmen, these mentors are called ambassadors. What I found in other freshmen transition programs is that most of their mentors are chosen based on achievements, both academic and athletic, but the freshmen who are mentored are not always that type of student, so it becomes hard for the mentee to connect with the mentor, and follow their actions.

What freshmen desire in a mentor is someone they can connect with, a peer that can lead them and know where they are coming from. To be an ambassador for TRL the student should be a leader that has credible relationships on campus, empowers students to do what’s right, challenges their own attitude, and leads by example. The TRL program gives the advisor and the ambassadors the ownership to customize the program to fit their school needs.

Keith Hawkins will train your ambassadors and advisor’s for a full day before your freshmen orientation. Most of the training focuses on the ambassador / freshmen relationship and the advisor’s roll as a TRL program director. Your advisor and ambassadors will be given the necessary tools to face the challenging, but rewarding school year. Your freshmen will benefit from having a mentor that will listen, lead, challenge, and help them become successful students at your school.

Derek Emery will be the only one who will conduct your training and TRL day. Keith has been training, organizing, speaking at freshmen orientations across the country for the past 20 years, and is considered one of the most knowledgeable orientation consultant in our country and will exclusively be there to help your freshmen program thrive and create a process that can be life changing for your students.

 

Camarillo, CA - Actress Nicole Brown and U.S. Astronaut Leland Melvin are the keynote speakers at an unprecedented teachers' summit taking place on the CSU Channel Islands (CI) campus July 31.

CI is one of 33 locations across California that will be hosting the "Better Together California Teachers Summit 2015," a one-day opportunity for all PreK through 12 teachers and teacher candidates to network, brainstorm, learn and share classroom practices.

The event is expected to draw about 20,000 teachers and teacher candidates around the state with about 250 gathering at the CI campus. Sixteen of the 33 locations hosting the statewide event are CSU campuses.

"First and foremost it gives teachers a chance to come together and share and have spontaneous conversations about their craft when they're relaxed during the summer," said Dianne Wilson-Graham, Executive Director of the California Physical Education—Health Project. "They'll be listening to other teachers' best practices and inspiring stories."

There are keynote speakers, but largely, the 8 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. conference is going to follow the fluid "EdCamp" model, an educator-specific conference model developed in 2009 by teachers in Philadelphia, Pa.

Unlike a regular conference set up months in advance, this "un-conference" doesn't have an agenda set up until the start of the event.

Instead of one person standing in front of the room and talking for an hour, educators will be encouraged to develop group discussions. Participants will then gravitate toward the session that most interests them.

Organizers have selected certain people to give "EDtalks," which are funny, poignant or informative stories designed to act catalysts for each spontaneous session.

Redwood Middle School teacher Elizabeth Dixon, who earned her Master's degree in Educational Leadership at CI, has been tapped to tell a story about the joy of teaching. She said it was one of the easiest homework assignments she's ever had.

"Kids are so inspiring, they will try anything," Dixon said of the age group she teaches at the Thousand Oaks middle school. "They are invincible right now, fearless."

Underscoring the talks will be stories about the most effective methods teachers' have used to teach the new California Standards.

"We have all the resources between us to be effective for our students," she said. "To give them enough challenge to unsettle them, but also to give them enough confidence to meet that challenge."

The keynote speakers are both advocates for education.

Nicole Brown, best-known for her role on NBC's "Community," recently joined talk show host Stephen Colbert with an initiative to fund education projects in South Carolina.

Leland Melvin, a football player turned NASA astronaut, exemplifies the galaxy of possibilities for someone with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) education.

Melvin has served as co-chair of the White House task force charged with developing the nation's five-year STEM education plan. He also serves on the International Space Education Board, a global collaboration dedicated to learning about space.

The one-of-a-kind free summit is sponsored by the California State University (CSU) system; the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU); and the New Teacher Center, a national non-profit organization dedicated to strengthening the practice of beginning teachers.

The free conference is almost full, but teachers can register for any remaining spots at www.CATeachersSummit.com and follow #CATeachersSummit for up-to-date information.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/

 

Camarillo, CA - CSU Channel Islands (CI) recently received approval from the Western Association for Schools and Colleges (WASC) for its first doctoral program, a Doctorate of Education or Ed.D. WASC is one of six regional college and university accrediting associations in the United States.

CI developed the Collaborative Online Doctorate in Educational Leadership (CODEL) program in partnership with CSU Fresno.

Students wishing to pursue an Ed.D. through the CODEL program, which includes the options of P-12 or higher education leadership, can begin in summer of 2016. The 60-unit program will take three years and include a dissertation.

"This step allows us to keep pace with the needs of our educational community," said CI President Richard R. Rush. "There is significant demand for qualified teachers and administrators in our area. We look forward to the day when we graduate our first cohort of doctoral students."

Associate Professor of Education Kaia Tollefson, Ph.D., one of the co-directors of the new Ed.D. program, is pleased to see a public option for those wishing to pursue doctoral studies in education in Ventura County.

"In order for us to be effective in promoting and building the public good, we have to have publicly-supported education at every level of the system," Tollefson said. "Supporting access to excellent educational opportunities for students at every level is fundamental to the public good."

A high quality, online doctoral program at a public university expands access and opportunity, making a doctorate in P-12 and higher education leadership a more feasible and affordable option for qualified applicants, she said.

The new doctoral program adds to the momentum that CI's School of Education has already achieved at the credential and graduate levels of study in Educational Leadership.

Of the most recent cohort of students who graduated from CI's Masters in Education and Administrative Services Credential program in spring 2015, six of 15 have already been offered jobs in school administration in Ventura County. Three are in the Hueneme School District; one is in the Pleasant Valley School District; one is in Fillmore; and one is in Simi Valley.

Tim Rummel, Ph.D., Program Coordinator for the Master's in Educational Leadership, says he believes the success of the program lies in a mix of faculty expertise and lecturers from the educational community who are working with talented and motivated students.

"Exceptional educators are choosing our program and the program has a strong faculty of practicing school administrators who are providing outstanding preparation for school
Leadership," Rummel said.

Merilyn Buchanan, Ph.D., Interim Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, and Director of the School of Education for the 2015-2016 academic year, will oversee the program's implementation and the launching of its first cohort in June of 2016.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI's strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master's degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research. CI has been designated by the U.S. Department of Education as a Hispanic-Serving Institution and is committed to serving students of all backgrounds from the region and beyond. Connect with and learn more about CI by visiting CI's Social Media.

The California State University (CSU) will reach a significant milestone of 3 million alumni during commencement in spring 2015 and has launched the world's largest yearbook. The Class of 3 Million online yearbook is an interactive platform where alumni can create a profile and connect with the millions of other alumni from the 23 CSU campuses across the state. Alumni who sign up for the yearbook will also be entered into a special contest to win one of three $10,000 scholarships for a current or future student, sponsored by Herff Jones. For more information about the yearbook and the Class of 3 Million, visit https://classof3million.calstate.edu/