Courtesy Mark M. Alvarado

I met Lang Martinez in April of 2019. I was employed by the City of Oxnard as a Homeless Services Coordinator. At that time, Martinez was introducing himself during the public comment period at the Oxnard City Council meetings. He was fresh from a drug recovery program. After years of being homeless and addicted to drugs, he was facing another turn at sobriety. It was clear that his comments during the City Council meetings were set up to challenge the City’s efforts for addressing homelessness.
After I resigned from my position in 2019, Martinez and I stayed in contact. Over the last three years I’ve learned more about Lang’s personal journey. He suffers from sexual abuse that was inflicted upon him as a child. Factor in years of smoking crystal meth and cocaine. I now have a better understanding of why he became homeless and a convicted criminal. I also have deeper knowledge of the complexities behind homelessness. Today, the amount of trauma and mental health problems inside chronic homelessness is irreversible in its totality. But on a case-by-case basis with personal determination and the appropriate support, a person can recover.

Lang Martinez has a compelling story to tell. It carries all the elements of a broken life with a ray of light for salvation. Yet, it is a story that yearns for redemption. It also explains and contributes to the why and how of the decisions he makes when advocating for the homeless in Ventura County.

Lang prides himself on being a resident homeless advocate. But with little formal education, Lang can be a bull in a china shop. He can be impulsive, abrasive and vexed.
But these negative traits are often a reflection of the trauma he has endured on the streets and from being in prison. Lang has built an unreasonable reputation. Is it only because he does not accept no for an answer when seeking resources for the homeless? He can often lock horns when people disagree with him. That reputation follows him wherever he goes. To say Lang Martinez is a little rough around the edges is an understatement. But to say he’s compassionate, determined and witty would be just as accurate.

Today, he lives to free himself from the living hell that once coated his life. Understanding Lang is a work in progress. It can be an unnerving experience for anyone on the opposite end of his advocacy. But this is what we get with a survivor like Lang. His social well- being was destroyed as a minor and what’s left of him is trying to recover. He continues to work with a therapist to help him manage his attitude and decision making and he visits with his pastor regularly for spiritual guidance.

Now after finding sobriety for the third time and in an odd and unorthodox manner, Lang Martinez has become an unofficial public figure in Ventura County. His knack for staying involved and showing up, welcomed or not to homeless related activities has been a bit of a show. His activism has exhausted his relationship with some homeless officials. But surely, he has grabbed their attention due to his persistent attitude.

Publicly, he’s been able to publish aspects of his life on the Ventura County based Citizens Journal website. He participated in an Oxnard citywide homeless summit in 2018 and soon after appeared in a homeless documentary produced by students at Cal State Channel Islands. He’s also been interviewed twice on Stop Child Abuse Now Internet Radio, produced by the National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse. Unfortunately, when he was arrested last year, KTLA News published an outdated mugshot of Lang with a report of all the charges he was facing. It’s safe to say a lot of people know about Lang.

I caught up with Lang after KTLA published his arrest. An ex-girlfriend pressed charges against him in December of 2021 for suspicion of felony domestic violence, assault with a deadly weapon, robbery, criminal threats, burglary, and possession of a firearm. On May 4, 2022 the charges were dropped by Judge Rocky Baio in Ventura County Superior Court. Due to his prior criminal record, Martinez was looking at a sentence that would have probably sent him to prison for the rest of his life.The charges were dismissed pursuant to penal code 1385, which allows a judge to dismiss a case “in furtherance of justice.” This outcome is the backdrop that drapes Lang’s recovery and survival for full vindication. The charges could have sunk his sobriety, but his personal conviction won out. He remained sober throughout the entire ordeal. This alone was a victory for Lang.

Days before the case was dropped, Martinez was buying cigarettes for a friend at a Ventura strip mall. As he sat in his car, he closely watched a homeless man dig through a trash can. Martinez could not help but think about the charges against him and his former life as a homeless person strung out on crystal meth. He lived like a pariah, rejected, and wounded to the core.

I asked Lang how he felt after seeing the homeless man digging through the trash can. He became quiet and his breathing became more rapid. It is apparent that he is triggered by his own trauma and experiences. He has lost 37 years of his life due to crime, drug addiction and homelessness.

“I’m him. I’m also his advocate because I can identify with his life. Society is no better than him and we have no right to judge him and I often feel like nobody knows but me.”

Lang’s recovery began eight months before he started speaking at the Oxnard City Council meetings. In the summer of 2017 and in critical condition, he was found in a parking lot in downtown Oxnard by the Oxnard Police Department. He was suffering from exposure, chronic drug abuse and close to death. He was eventually transported to Ventura County Medical Center where his life was saved.

“I used to come to work every morning and see Lang behind my office passed out and foaming at the mouth,” says former downtown Oxnard merchant Ron Freeman. “I seriously thought I would come to work one day and find him dead.”

Martinez speaks with a rough gravel in his throat, he often wonders aloud how his life had shifted and was turned upside down at the age of 17. His parents were still in their teens when he was born. His mother, Anglo, and his father, Chicano, divorced. His mother remarried but Lang did not have a great relationship with his stepfather. It was in 1980, a junior at Westchester High School in West LA, when Martinez entered the world of cocaine trafficking. He was selling cocaine for an employer and it came with a ticket straight into the dark side of Hollywood. Lang says his mother went above and beyond to try and rescue him from the LA drug scene. Unfortunately, she could not save her son. Now 58 years old, the once teenage BMX racer living just miles from the beach, ended up a strung- out street person. He traces his downfall to when he met his drug induced predator, who Martinez says sexually assaulted him as a minor.

According to Martinez, he sold directly to Hollywood stars, nightclubs and specifically at the popular underage dance club, The Odyssey.

“The Odyssey in Hollywood was all about drugs, hustling, sex and violence and it was promoted well,” says Eric Hamm.

Hamm is a 55-year-old survivor of the teenage scene in Hollywood, a former punk rocker who now drives for Uber and cares for his elderly mother in Ventura County.

“I know half a dozen kids who died from being a part of that scene, some just disappeared,” says Hamm.

In the 1980’s, the infamous Odyssey, which burned down in 1985, was considered ground zero for underage drug use and sexual predators. Dr. Lois Lee is the world’s leading expert in rescuing child sex trafficking victims. She is the founder of the LA nonprofit Children of the Night. Since 1979, her organization has saved thousands of teenage lives from prostitution. She says teens were victims of prey at the hands of adult pedophiles. She knows adults had unabated access to underage clubs like the Odyssey. She was in the thick of it, working tirelessly on the streets of Hollywood saving as many children as she could.

“Lang is a survivor. Many of the kids from that period are either dead, had contracted HIV or are in prison,” says Dr. Lee.

According to Dr. Katherine Emerick, a Clinical and Forensic Psychologist in Ventura County, there is a reasonable basis to believe that Martinez was subjected to childhood sexual abuse when he was in his late teens. After meeting and interviewing Martinez, Dr. Emerick concluded in a written certificate of merit, that Martinez’ memory of being sexually assaulted was discovered after intensive regression therapy in 2020.

Martinez says once he turned 18, he was no longer needed as a drug runner and that is when the sexual abuse stopped. However, the madness in his life only intensified.

“In therapy is when I realized what had happened to me, I finally understood what my pain was all about and why I had suffered through multiple drug relapses and incarceration. My pain left me frozen. I have now received the help of professionals and I have a responsibility to help others. I have a story to tell. I am a courageous survivor because I did not let the monsters kill me,” says Martinez.

Now after 41 years of living a broken life. He’s often stuck thinking about his drug abuse, a failed marriage, incarceration and homelessness. Martinez is now in full recovery. He has been sober and off the streets for four years this July. He is committed to his recovery and wants his story to be known. He believes there are more victims like him who have lived in fear, shame and silence.

“I must show society that today I have taken responsibility for my life. I made a promise to God that I can forgive myself for the damage I have caused and live a life to help others who suffer from homelessness, drug addiction and other traumatic experiences,” says Martinez.

At the height of his addiction to crystal meth, Martinez caused a major shutdown of a Crescenta Valley neighborhood in January of 2011. According to a report in the Los Angeles Times, he got into a car chase with the California Highway Patrol after stealing power tools from an Orchard Hardware store. As he got away, he caused a car accident and fled on foot into a residential area. This forced law enforcement to shut down a major intersection for three hours. Officers on foot and by helicopter searched for him. He was able to escape after stealing a bike. Two weeks later he was caught and charged for stealing electronics from a Target store in Burbank and was also charged with robbery of the Orchard Hardware store and evading officers in Crescenta Valley.

He atoned for the havoc he caused the community of Crescenta Valley 11 years ago. In 2021, he reached out to the Crescenta Valley News, who also covered the story. They published an apology from Martinez to the people of that community.

“I’m sorry,” he stated. “I’m so sorry when I learned I had hit an elderly couple.” Martinez told the Crescenta Valley News that he did not realize what had happened during both incidents.

Combining through the memory of the havoc he caused in Crescenta Valley with the recent felony domestic violence charges filed against him, Martinez looks at his life with this understanding.

“Looking at the seriousness of the crimes I’ve committed when I was on drugs and the recent false charges against me, I am just putting it all behind me. I now realize that I have become the cause for my future, rather than the effect of my past.”

Today, Martinez’ purpose is being built around his rogue homeless advocacy in Ventura County. He is a staunch believer in mental health, alcohol and drug abuse recovery before providing permanent housing to homeless persons. His strong voice in Ventura County towards supporting the homeless has cemented his name among homeless service providers. He has been persistent, advocating for the lives of those experiencing chronic homelessness and believes that if he can recover, others can too.

As a downtown business owner in Oxnard, Ron Freeman knows first-hand how Martinez’ independent approach has had an impact providing outreach to homeless individuals with results.

“I can’t say that Lang has done anything to help the overall homeless problem in Oxnard, but I can tell you that he has had a significant impact on helping individuals with immediate needs due to their homeless situation,” says Freeman.

Freeman was forced to shut down his office where he provided independent financial services in downtown Oxnard due to the pandemic but has stayed in contact with Martinez.

“I’ve seen Lang help homeless people directly. He knows the resources available and he has helped a lot of people who were in crisis. He would bring homeless folks into my office and ask if he could use the phone to call for help,” says Freeman. “Lang would go into Plaza Park and pull people off the streets and find them help. His peer-to-peer approach can be effective.”

Martinez recently assisted a 49-year-old homeless woman in Oxnard. She was struggling to get off drugs, he helped her to find an emergency shelter. She is now sober and living in a supportive housing environment with resources, and she has also enrolled at Ventura College.

Assisting this Oxnard woman is a fitting example of how Martinez helps others struggling on the streets. But it is his own struggle and journey that will resonate with others who are child victims of sexual abuse. What is contrasting is that success had run deep in his family. Lang is the grandson of Horacio Martinez, who was the pioneering executive director for the leading Los Angeles Spanish newspaper, La Opinion. As well his maternal grandfather, Tom Barrett, who worked for President Roosevelt as a secret service agent in the 1940’s.

Today, Martinez says he often sits alone digging through the trash that still lives inside him. He thinks about the nasty puzzle that represents the life he has lived. He admits that his story is hard to believe. But a person needs just five minutes with him. The level of hurt and trauma he has suffered will come to life. Martinez knows that he is fortunate to be alive. This alone gives him the motivation to try and help others.

“Lang is a resilient person, but he makes mistakes,” says Bill Murray of the National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse. “He’s always trying to help people and that’s a big part of his recovery.”

From his childhood and up to today, Lang Martinez has faced situations in life the average person would never imagine. The long-term effects of being a crystal meth addict can be debilitating, but he is recovering as a true survivor. He strongly believes his story will set him and other victims of sexual assault free from a living hell wrought with silence, guilt and pain.

“I now realize that this is what I had to go through to get to the other side, a place of healing in order to help others like me,” says Martinez. He says that his life’s journey is just the way it is, that after being lost for so many years, he cannot expect immediate freedom once in recovery.

Sobriety sits at the core of his life today. His ongoing commitment to stay sober and to find a way to circulate his story drives his desire to help others. He believes that if his ongoing advocacy can also reach those who are victims of sexual assault, he could establish a platform for resources and support that links homelessness, drug addiction and incarceration with being a victim of sexual violence. This is Lang’s vision. But he knows it depends on his ability to maintain his recovery.

“It’s a lifelong process, living life on life’s terms is a life struggle and it’s not easy,” says Martinez. “My recovery must believe that God is everything or it is nothing at all. My past will always be a part of me. It is the key but not the lock.”

 


 
On Friday morning to midday, on June 24th, Edison workers had road work signs up at Central Avenue and the Sespe intersection to work on the power lines, (maybe) preparing for the summer heat ahead.
On Friday morning to midday, on June 24th, Edison workers had road work signs up at Central Avenue and the Sespe intersection to work on the power lines, (maybe) preparing for the summer heat ahead.
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Pictured is Rotary President Andy Klittich inducting two new members into the Rotary Club of Fillmore: Carina
Forsythe and Anna Reilley. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
Pictured is Rotary President Andy Klittich inducting two new members into the Rotary Club of Fillmore: Carina Forsythe and Anna Reilley. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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Fillmore Rotarian Cindy Blatt and FHS Interact Club Advisor Jeremiah McMahn introduced six Interact Club members who visited Fillmore Rotary last week. They were Emma Myers, Melissa Higuera, Jimena Cortes, Gabriela Herrera, Brianna Camacho and Nathalia Magana. Interact Clubs bring together young people to develop leadership skills while discovering the power of Service Above Self. The Club plans projects to help their school or community and participates in Rotary projects as will. Rotary Club sponsors, mentors and guides Interactors as they carry out their projects and develop leadership skills. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
Fillmore Rotarian Cindy Blatt and FHS Interact Club Advisor Jeremiah McMahn introduced six Interact Club members who visited Fillmore Rotary last week. They were Emma Myers, Melissa Higuera, Jimena Cortes, Gabriela Herrera, Brianna Camacho and Nathalia Magana. Interact Clubs bring together young people to develop leadership skills while discovering the power of Service Above Self. The Club plans projects to help their school or community and participates in Rotary projects as will. Rotary Club sponsors, mentors and guides Interactors as they carry out their projects and develop leadership skills. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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Join us, the Friends of California Condors Wild & Free and more Ventura County outdoor recreation groups, at Sheills Park in Fillmore, for the first ever Condor Country Nature Fest next Saturday, June 4th from 11:00am to 3:00pm.

Condor Country covers over 10,000 square miles in Southern California, across so many wonderful nature areas that we can all go out and enjoy; and oh, and how many great ways there are to get outdoors and enjoy our environment!

The Condor Country Nature Fest will help connect you to local outdoor recreation and education opportunities in Ventura County
from hunting and fishing to habitat restoration and of course all things Condor. You'll even be able take a shot at archery,
a great non-lead hunting option, with the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

 

On May 18, 2022, Nova Storage received unanimous Planning Commission approval to expand its self-storage facility in Fillmore by 16,500 square feet, or about 60%. The two-story addition will feature at grade entrances on both floors and 14 drive up units. This project will represent Nova’s second expansion in Fillmore.

The existing storage facility is a conversion of a 1947 fruit packing plant. The new building will incorporate a ‘saw-tooth’ roof feature to tie together the two buildings architecturally. The project will also include upgrades to the adjacent bike path. The expansion is expected to open in Spring 2023.

“Nova Storage would like to thank the Planning Department for their support of this project.” said Andrew Rankin, President of Nova Storage.

About Nova Storage: Headquartered in Mission Hills, California, Nova Storage offers Safe, Clean, Well-Lit and Secure self-storage to over 7,000 tenants. Founded in 1982, Nova is locally owned and operated, with ten locations across Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Ventura Counties.

Nova Storage Fillmore is open for business, and customers can reserve their own secure space by visiting NovaStorage.com or calling (805) 944-1392.

 

Man Arrested for Domestic Violence, ADW, Robbery, Criminal Threats, Burglary & Felon in Possession of a Firearm - 12/12/2021 EDITION FILLMORE GAZETTE

UPDATE: On May 4, 2022 all misdemeanor and felony charges were dropped against Lang Martinez.

 

Where: Fillmore High School Drama Room – right across from the Memorial Building

When: June 1st at 6pm

We are a culturally rich community, but we have been missing a vital part of our artistic core – live theatre. It’s time we pushed for return of this much-loved art form that has been such a vital part of our community – our culture – for decades. It’s time for The Sespe Players.

After a challenging couple of years (due to the pandemic), your local community theatre troupe, The Sespe Players, Inc., are gearing up for the upcoming season. Our first production is in the planning stage and the rest of the performance schedule is yet to be established. We could sure use your input!

On June 1st, at 6pm, The Sespe Players will meet in the Drama Room at Fillmore High School (directly across the street from the Memorial Building). We will be discussing the upcoming jukebox musical (woohoo!), available performance spaces, future productions, and welcoming our new and returning members (YOU!). Every performance troupe needs actors, of course, but we would welcome any and all with the desire to help with set construction, lighting design, costuming, prop handling, directing, stage managing, accounting… you name it, we could use your talents!

 
Fillmore City Council
Fillmore City Council
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All following items approved by unanimous voice vote:
6-C City Council, consistent with the recommendation from the Mayor, appointed Dr. Giselle Teller to fill the position on the Parks and Recreation Commission through June 30, 2026.
6-D The City Council memorialized the authorization to use electronic signatures when allowed by law.
6-E The Contract Services Agreement for 2022-23 Engineering Consultant Services with David Burkhart was approved.
6-F Council approved the second reading to adopt an Ordinance entitled "An Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Fillmore, California, Updating Portions of the City’s Animal Control Regulations in Title 9 of the Fillmore Municipal Code.”
New Business
7-A The attached Second Amendment to the Implementation Agreement for the NPDES Ventura Countywide Stormwater Quality Management Program Implementation Agreement was approved unanimously.
7-B Staff requested the City Council hold a Public Hearing and adopt the attached resolutions approving the Engineer’s Annual Report for FY 2022-23 (“Engineer’s Report”) and ordering the levy and collection of annual assessments for the City of Fillmore Landscape and Lighting District No. 2 (“LLD 2”) and Heritage Valley Landscape and Lighting District 2007-1 (“LLD 2007-1”), respectively. Council approved unanimously.
7-C Staff requested that the City Council conduct a Public Hearing and adopt Resolution No. 22-3884 Confirming the Annual Budget and Ordering the Levy and Collection of Assessments for the Storm Drain Maintenance Assessment Districts for FY 2022/23. Resolution approved unanimously.
7-D Staff requested that the City Council approve the third amendment to the contract with Willdan Engineering Services, Inc. (Willdan) for contract city engineering services. Approved unanimously.
7-E City Council approved a proposal for the preparation of plans, specifications and estimates for the FY2021/22 Annual Street Resurfacing project and authorize the City Manager to issue a task order to Willdan Engineering as authorized under the Third Amendment of the Contract Services Agreement for City Engineering Services. Approved unanimously.
7-F Staff requested that the City Council adopt Resolution Number 22-3889 setting the GANN Appropriation Limit for Fiscal Year 2022-23. Approved unanimously.
7-G Staff recommended that the City Council approve an amendment to Title 16 of the Fillmore Municipal Code (“FMC”) to allow specified circumstances in which the Director of Finance, or in the Director of Finance’s absence, the City Manager can allow payment plans for customers with overdue bills when those customers have household income which is less than 200% of the federal poverty line. Approved unanimously.

 
The Rotary Club of Fillmore sent three FHS Juniors to RYLA Rotary Youth Leadership Awards camp in Ojai. The goal is Building Tomorrow’s Leaders through Leadership, Citizenship and Personal Development. The three students were (l-r) Jovany Perez, Cecelia Arias and Paola Ruiz. They talked about their experiences, meeting new people and being part of a team and working together. The ropes course was the scariest challenge; they had to rely on their teammates. On Sunday, at closing, Jovany received a Valor Award for helping someone, who was scared, succeed to the end. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
The Rotary Club of Fillmore sent three FHS Juniors to RYLA Rotary Youth Leadership Awards camp in Ojai. The goal is Building Tomorrow’s Leaders through Leadership, Citizenship and Personal Development. The three students were (l-r) Jovany Perez, Cecelia Arias and Paola Ruiz. They talked about their experiences, meeting new people and being part of a team and working together. The ropes course was the scariest challenge; they had to rely on their teammates. On Sunday, at closing, Jovany received a Valor Award for helping someone, who was scared, succeed to the end. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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In observance of the Memorial Day holiday, employees of Santa Clara Valley Disposal will be taking the day off on Monday, May 30. As a result, Fillmore residential customers will have their trash, recycling and yard/organic waste collected on Saturday June 4, one day later than usual.

The regular Friday collection schedule will resume the following week.

Harrison Industries serves the cities and surrounding unincorporated areas of Ventura, Ojai and Camarillo as well as the unincorporated areas of El Rio, Somis, Ojai Valley, the Channel Islands beach communities and the city of Carpinteria as E.J. Harrison & Sons; Fillmore and surrounding unincorporated areas as Santa Clara Valley Disposal; and the unincorporated areas of Newbury Park as Newbury Disposal. For more information, visit www.ejharrison.com

 
The Fillmore Philanthropic, Education, Organization (PEO) Chapter GY presented the 2022 Education Award to Emilia Magdaleno. Also pictured are PEO committee members Carolyn Diaz, Jan Lee, Pat Morris and Joanne King who presented Emilia with her award. Photo courtesy Martha Richardson. “Women Helping Women Reach for the Stars.”
The Fillmore Philanthropic, Education, Organization (PEO) Chapter GY presented the 2022 Education Award to Emilia Magdaleno. Also pictured are PEO committee members Carolyn Diaz, Jan Lee, Pat Morris and Joanne King who presented Emilia with her award. Photo courtesy Martha Richardson. “Women Helping Women Reach for the Stars.”
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(l-r) Rotary President Andy Klittich, District Attorney Erik Nasarenko, and Fillmore Police Chief and Rotarian Garo Kuredjian. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
(l-r) Rotary President Andy Klittich, District Attorney Erik Nasarenko, and Fillmore Police Chief and Rotarian Garo Kuredjian. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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Erik Nasarenko, District Attorney for the County of Ventura, was the Fillmore Rotary speaker last week. He is a Rotarian and Paul Harris Fellow. Before he became the District Attorney he was a prosecutor for domestic violence and sex crimes. Since he became the District Attorney, he has hired 15 prosecutors; one is a Fillmore woman, Twila Atmore, daughter of Clark and Shelley Johnson. One of his goals has been to get grants from the Department of Justice to form a Cold Case Department, to test DNA samples and solve more crimes.

 
Rotary President Andy Klittich, left, inducted new member Greg Agostinelli into the club last week. Greg is the Arts Commissioner, and is involved locally in music, proposing the Film Festival concept. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
Rotary President Andy Klittich, left, inducted new member Greg Agostinelli into the club last week. Greg is the Arts Commissioner, and is involved locally in music, proposing the Film Festival concept. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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Council Votes 7A - 7E - 4-0
7-D Approved: SECOND READING TO ADOPT ORDINANCE NO. 21-938 UPDATING
FILLMORE MUNICIPAL CODER CHAPTER 15.38 “FIREWORKS”
7-E Approved: Based on the Council approval of the creation of the new Senior Nutrition Aide position in January of this year, staff recommends that Council approve an amendment to the Memorandum of Understanding between the City and IUOE, Local 501 to update Salary Schedule “S” to reflect the inclusion of the Senior Nutrition Aide classification. The full-time Active Adult Senior Nutrition Aide will be paid a range of $16.72/hr. to $22.41/hr. (annual compensation range of $31,518 to $42,237.13). The City met and conferred with IUOE, Local 501 on this proposed amendment to the MOU and they are in agreement and have signed Amendment No. 1.
8-A Vote 3 (yes) 1- (no). RECOMMENDATION
Request: That the City Council:
1. Receive an update regarding the Fillmore Equestrian Center Grading; and
2. Provide comments to staff regarding the proposed revised grading plan to increase the
depth of the fill blanket and creation of an 80 to 100’ wide elevated pad area adjacent to
the westerly levee.
Items 9-A to 9-E. Unanimously Approved. (4-0)
9. NEW BUSINESS
9.A Review of the Engineer’s Report Regarding the Proposed Increase in Assessments for the City of Fillmore Storm Drain Maintenance Districts, Consideration of a Resolution to Initiate the Proceedings and the Intent to Levy the Annual Assessments, and Setting of a Public Hearing Date to Consider This Proposal
Fillmore Storm Drain Assessment District _SR_Final.pdf
9.B Review and Initiation of Proceedings for the Annual Levy the Annual of Assessments for the City of Fillmore Landscape and Lighting District No. 02 and Heritage Valley Landscape and Lighting District 2007-1; Approval of the Engineer’s Report Regarding the Proposed Increased Assessments; and Set the Public Hearing to Consider This
Proposal
FY 2022-23 Staff Report Landscape Lighting Districts_Final.pdf
9.C CITY COUNCIL DISCUSSION OF A LICENSE AGREEMENT WITH THE FILLMORE
UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR THE USE OF THE FILLMORE AQUATIC CENTER
SR - 2022 Aquatic Center Agreement with FUSD_Final.pdf
9.D 510 SANTA CLARA AVENUE PROPERTY UPDATE AND REQUEST FOR AUTHORIZATION TO RECORD A DEED RESTRICTION.
510 Santa Clara Deed Restriction-SR- Final.pdf
9.E CONSIDERATION OF CITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 22-3876, CALLING AND
GIVING NOTICE OF THE NOVEMBER 8, 2022, GENERAL MUNICIPAL ELECTION;
AND RESOLUTION NO. 22-3877, REQUESTING CONSOLIDATION WITH THE
GUBERNATORIAL GENERAL ELECTION BEING CONDUCTED BY THE COUNTY
OF VENTURA THE SAME DAY

 
Last week Fillmore Rotary Club President Andy Klittich welcomed their District Governor, Dana Moldovan. She was originally from Romania and joined the Rotary Club of Westlake Village in 2002. Her slogan this year is “Think Different” which is what we have had to do during the pandemic. Many clubs met on Zoom and the Rotary International Convention was virtual, but there was still leadership training, fellowship and plans for the new normal. Moldovan congratulated the Fillmore Club for winning the Silver Club Award for last year. She was also happy to hear about how the Club is supporting Fillmore youth through scholarships, dictionaries, water safety, Interact Club, RYLA, etc. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
Last week Fillmore Rotary Club President Andy Klittich welcomed their District Governor, Dana Moldovan. She was originally from Romania and joined the Rotary Club of Westlake Village in 2002. Her slogan this year is “Think Different” which is what we have had to do during the pandemic. Many clubs met on Zoom and the Rotary International Convention was virtual, but there was still leadership training, fellowship and plans for the new normal. Moldovan congratulated the Fillmore Club for winning the Silver Club Award for last year. She was also happy to hear about how the Club is supporting Fillmore youth through scholarships, dictionaries, water safety, Interact Club, RYLA, etc. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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On Wednesday, April 6, Rotary Club President Andy Klittich (right) welcomed guest speaker Jeffrey Lambert, Chief Operating Officer of the Ventura County Community Foundation, a nonprofit center. The organization represents donors who want to give back to the community and invests money so yearly donations can be made. They provide funds to other non-profits to help them grow, give scholarships to change kid’s lives, have caregivers who navigate hospitals to help people, and they help the Early Childhood Preschool facilities in Santa Paula with funding. This is only a small example of what they do. For more info: VCCF.org. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
On Wednesday, April 6, Rotary Club President Andy Klittich (right) welcomed guest speaker Jeffrey Lambert, Chief Operating Officer of the Ventura County Community Foundation, a nonprofit center. The organization represents donors who want to give back to the community and invests money so yearly donations can be made. They provide funds to other non-profits to help them grow, give scholarships to change kid’s lives, have caregivers who navigate hospitals to help people, and they help the Early Childhood Preschool facilities in Santa Paula with funding. This is only a small example of what they do. For more info: VCCF.org. Photo credit Rotarian Martha Richardson.
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S.T.E.M. Friday! A Marshmallow Engineering Challenge was held at the Piru Boys & Girls Club. The activities keep the fun and learning going for all to enjoy. Photos courtesy https://www.facebook.com/bgclubscv.
S.T.E.M. Friday! A Marshmallow Engineering Challenge was held at the Piru Boys & Girls Club. The activities keep the fun and learning going for all to enjoy. Photos courtesy https://www.facebook.com/bgclubscv.
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(l-r) Santa Clara Valley Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year, Gonzalo Garcia Jr. with SCVBGC CEO Jan Marholin.
(l-r) Santa Clara Valley Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year, Gonzalo Garcia Jr. with SCVBGC CEO Jan Marholin.
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March 2022

Congratulations to our Youth of the Year representative Gonzalo Garcia Jr.

Youth of the Year is our signature effort to foster a new generation of leaders, communicators and goal setting young adults to prepare them to meet the challenges of adolescence and adulthood.

Gonzalo from our Fillmore Clubhouse was picked because he has the signature qualities of a leader. He excels as a good communicator, problem solver, and a motivator. Gonzalo also had stellar letters of recommendation commending his extraordinary efforts to be a positive role model for anyone around him.

Join us in congratulating Gonzalo for his achievements and for being an agent of change. We are proud to have him represent the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley and we look forward to watch him achieve his goals.

 
Friday Robotics Fun! Students put together Mechanical Engineering Rovers & Vehicles as part of Robotics Day this past Friday at the Boys and Girls Club in both Fillmore and Piru Clubhouses. Pictured are two kids looking over directions as the work to put together their robot vehicles. Photos courtesy https://www.facebook.com/bgclubscv
Friday Robotics Fun! Students put together Mechanical Engineering Rovers & Vehicles as part of Robotics Day this past Friday at the Boys and Girls Club in both Fillmore and Piru Clubhouses. Pictured are two kids looking over directions as the work to put together their robot vehicles. Photos courtesy https://www.facebook.com/bgclubscv
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