Fillmore Fire Department had a wonderful turnout of over 80 individuals who participated in the Hands Only CPR event in front of Vons on the 600 block of Ventura Street Thursday, June 2nd. By teaching community members Hands-Only CPR, more victims of sudden cardiac arrests will have bystander performed CPR and will be more likely to survive. Customers who were approached and invited to participate were instructed on proper steps to Hands Only CPR. They were taught to check for responsiveness: shaking and shouting “Are you okay?”: followed by calling 911 or having someone else do so if the individual is unresponsive and breathing slowly or not at all. Compress: Position on the floor face up. Kneel right next to the person - so your knees touch his/her arm. Place the heel of one hand on the center of the chest at the sternum and the other hand on top of the first. Lock your elbows put your shoulders over the center of the chest and push HARD straight downward - at least 2 inches. Lift your hands off the chest slightly after each compression to allow the chest to fully re-expand. Compress fast at a rate of 100 per minute. Continue until EMS arrives. Don’t stop if the person gasps it is not a sign of recovery - it’s because you are doing a good job with CPR. When you tire switch off with other people. Many people are concerned they might do something wrong, but the only way to make things worse is by doing nothing. Some of the participants had expressed past experiences where this would have been helpful and possibly life saving for their friends and family members. This event proved to be very well received and appreciated by the community. Pictured is Firefighter David Biazon. Photo courtesy Sebastian Ramirez.
Fillmore Fire Department had a wonderful turnout of over 80 individuals who participated in the Hands Only CPR event in front of Vons on the 600 block of Ventura Street Thursday, June 2nd. By teaching community members Hands-Only CPR, more victims of sudden cardiac arrests will have bystander performed CPR and will be more likely to survive. Customers who were approached and invited to participate were instructed on proper steps to Hands Only CPR. They were taught to check for responsiveness: shaking and shouting “Are you okay?”: followed by calling 911 or having someone else do so if the individual is unresponsive and breathing slowly or not at all. Compress: Position on the floor face up. Kneel right next to the person - so your knees touch his/her arm. Place the heel of one hand on the center of the chest at the sternum and the other hand on top of the first. Lock your elbows put your shoulders over the center of the chest and push HARD straight downward - at least 2 inches. Lift your hands off the chest slightly after each compression to allow the chest to fully re-expand. Compress fast at a rate of 100 per minute. Continue until EMS arrives. Don’t stop if the person gasps it is not a sign of recovery - it’s because you are doing a good job with CPR. When you tire switch off with other people. Many people are concerned they might do something wrong, but the only way to make things worse is by doing nothing. Some of the participants had expressed past experiences where this would have been helpful and possibly life saving for their friends and family members. This event proved to be very well received and appreciated by the community. Pictured is Firefighter David Biazon. Photo courtesy Sebastian Ramirez.
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Yard of the Month winners Kevin and Sheryl with Theresa Robledo.
Yard of the Month winners Kevin and Sheryl with Theresa Robledo.
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Theresa Robledo with Civic Pride Vision 2020 presents Yard of the Month to Kevin & Sheryl. Congratulations! “ A little over a year ago my fiancée and I started looking for a home to buy. After many months of looking, our search led us to Fillmore. We were drawn in by the beautiful mountain views and the warm, small-town feel; and, let us not forget … the housing prices. We visited the Bridges track by Williams Homes and fell in love with their model three floor plan, and the bungalow style exterior. After settling on one home, my fiancée, Sheryl, convinced me that we would be happier in a different model three on a specific lot within the track. Well, that lot was to have a farmhouse exterior, and not only that, but a red farmhouse exterior. After realizing we just bought a barn to live in I decided to fully embrace the theme the City was trying to convey. After many months of staring at our new barn and thinking, “what is missing,” it came to me, “this barn needs a windmill!” So the hunt for the perfect windmill began. After many days of research I found the Aermotor Windmill Company. For over 125 years they have been making windmills for ranchers and they are still running strong to this day in San Angelo, Texas. So on the return from a road trip to Texas to visit my parents I swung by their factory. There I picked up the first addition to our little ranch in Fillmore, that beautiful Aermotor 702 in our front yard. The windmill gave the house a great little ranch appeal as it spun around and around and around. However, on one of Fillmore’s amazing evenings while watching the windmill just quietly spinning and turning, it seemed to me like the windmill was lonely; tirelessly looking for a long lost partner to share its life. So, yet another hunt began … the hunt for the perfect tractor! After many months of searching I found it, a 1949 John Deere BN tractor. This little tractor was hidden away in a garage in the outskirts of Barstow, California. It was restored several years ago and very well taken care of. Now, the windmill has a friend with which it can share those amazing evenings. So far, aside from the windmill and the tractor, we have planted over 20 trees on the property, built a custom shed that matches the house, added garden bridges and brick pathways meandering throughout the backyard. We have many years to come and many more projects planned, including another tractor for the backyard garden area, assuming I can get Sheryl to agree. If you ever see an old green tractor putting down Central, it’s just me having fun bringing back a little historic, old-town feel to Fillmore. “ Drive by 357 Edgewood Drive. Thank you Otto & Sons Nursery for the generous gift certificate to Kevin & Sheryl.

 


 
Rotary FHS Scholarship Recipients. The Fillmore High School scholarship recipients. Pictures (l-r) are Elizabeth Manzano, Tatem Forsberg, committee member Scott Beylik, Matthew Hammond, Hope Wilcox, Irma Torres, Jessica Manginelli, Maria Perez, Jaqueline Tovar, Luis Landeros, and Andy Klittich committee member.
Rotary FHS Scholarship Recipients. The Fillmore High School scholarship recipients. Pictures (l-r) are Elizabeth Manzano, Tatem Forsberg, committee member Scott Beylik, Matthew Hammond, Hope Wilcox, Irma Torres, Jessica Manginelli, Maria Perez, Jaqueline Tovar, Luis Landeros, and Andy Klittich committee member.
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Rotary Makes Donation To Lifewater. Martha Richardson program chair, presented Rod Thompson of Lifewater with a donation check for $450. Lifewater is a Christian organization that drills wells, educates and trains people in deprived counties, so they will have clean water and healthier lives.
Rotary Makes Donation To Lifewater. Martha Richardson program chair, presented Rod Thompson of Lifewater with a donation check for $450. Lifewater is a Christian organization that drills wells, educates and trains people in deprived counties, so they will have clean water and healthier lives.
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Boy Scouts from Troop 406: James Chandler, Matt Van de Mheen, Jared Fairall, Jr. Escoto, Timmy Vargas, Matt Henschel, and Brett Chandler, Scoutmaster, are shown emptying the flag retirement drop box.
Boy Scouts from Troop 406: James Chandler, Matt Van de Mheen, Jared Fairall, Jr. Escoto, Timmy Vargas, Matt Henschel, and Brett Chandler, Scoutmaster, are shown emptying the flag retirement drop box.
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Do you have an old U.S. flag that has frayed edges and faded colors? Boy Scout Troop 406 has a collection box in front of the Fillmore Fire Station on Sespe where you can deposit that flag and the Boy Scouts will retire it in a dignified ceremony. The Scouts have retired over 200 flags in the last year.

During the ceremony the Senior Patrol Leader reads a script that describes the flag and the meaning of the stripes, stars and blue field they are on. During the reading the flag is ceremoniously folded into a triangle. Then the pledge of allegiance is spoken by all. At the end of the reading the flags are placed into a fire and the Scouts give a solemn salute. In the background, a trumpet plays taps to complete the program.

Celebrate Flag Day on June 14th by flying your flag at home and depositing any damaged flags in the box at the Fillmore Fire Station.

 


 
Members of Bardsdale 4H met at Bardsdale Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon to remove the flags honoring Veterans for Memorial Day. Thanks for helping!
Members of Bardsdale 4H met at Bardsdale Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon to remove the flags honoring Veterans for Memorial Day. Thanks for helping!
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Last week we learned about diaphragmatic breathing. I also informed the reader on how runners use belly breathing for efficient maximum oxygen capacity. I wanted to correct a minor grammatical error just in case there was any confusion. It should have read: “three foot-strikes” and “two foot-strikes.” Having cleared that up what it fundamentally means is that life requires balance in every aspect of it. My personal belief is that the 12th and last precept of balance is the most fundamental to health and well-being. It is the efficiency of maintaining alpha and theta brain wavelengths and reducing frenetic beta brain waves. Belly breathing quickly gets you there.

Meditation is the practice of maintaining and or shifting to alpha and theta brain wavelengths ultimately causing transformative body and mind processes that translate to health but ultimately to collective relational transformation. If that sounds farfetched it isn't. If we do not transform our collective neural networks we will go extinct. We have been in an unsustainable socio-economic model for multiple millennia. We exist on a finite planet. Sustainability is necessary for a future. Meditation is an exercise to shift us to a new era of balance.
Scientifically, meditation is about creating new neural networks and overriding the millennia-old brain networks containing the unsustainable neuroses social model. Antecedents have perpetually dumped unworkable futures into subsequent generations as if they are robotic repositories.

Meditation does not require sitting and closing your eyes, although if you become a practitioner then you'll adopt the core practice of quieting the mind and body with eyes closed and body comfortably relaxed. The practice does not require external quietness.

Anywhere and anytime, standing, walking, driving, cycling, running, shopping - all day and night until sleep - on and off - with eyes open focus on your natural nasal breathing process -preferably diaphragmatically, comfortably swelling your belly. The act of focusing on your breathing process temporarily suspends the thought process. During meditation thoughts will push their way into your quietness because your brain is untrained, undisciplined and atrophied. Meditation requires constantly returning to your breathing with no judgment about the interruption due to thought invasion.

All that is required to have personal and social transformation is to want it. Meditation is not about thinking about transformation. It is about wanting a new you and a new humanity by creating new neural networks while resting in the space between thoughts. Think of the space as a clearing in a thicket of weeds.

After you have read this article take the next 30 seconds or 5 minutes and practice. On and off all day and into the night create a new you and a balanced workable future for our children and the unborn.

Paul Benavidez, MFA

 
Harold and Ella McGregor, November 8, 1936
Harold and Ella McGregor, November 8, 1936
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It’s June and a popular time of year for young couples to celebrate weddings. Beginning in June 2016, the Fillmore Historical Museum located at 340 Main St. in Fillmore will have on display a selection of photos and wedding dresses from 1886 through the 1960s. We are grateful for the generosity of our community that these items can be seen and appreciated.

The display includes a century-old hand crocheted wedding dress, a dress worn by both mother and daughter at their weddings, and a 70 year old dress that is modern enough to be found on the fashion runways of today.

Courtesy of Mathias Gonzalez, we include the Hispanic tradition of the father of the groom writing the father of the bride, asking for the bride’s hand in marriage. Pictures of the families and a copy of the letter, written in Spanish and translated into English are on display. We invite you to visit the museum and discover the joys of romance and marriage during the time period since Fillmore’s establishment through the mid-20th century.

This is your hometown museum dedicated to showing how Fillmore and its surrounding communities of Bardsdale, Sespe and Piru grew and developed and celebrated life.

We welcome you all to visit. We are open Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 9 a.m. until noon, and 1 p.m. until 4 p.m., Thursdays from 1-4 and Saturdays from 10:30 until 3 p.m. We offer tours to groups any day by appointment.

We are an all volunteer organization and are always looking for additional helpers to guide tours or work in the collection. If you are interested contact us at the office in the two story bunkhouse building or by phone at 524-0948.

 
Joey Orozco, 20
Joey Orozco, 20

Orozco was part of the Lioneer’s who went to Mount Whitney. Joey attended Pyle’s Boys Camp when he was 13, 14 and 15, and worked there for two years as a camp counselor. Joey is now in Mississippi in the United States Air Force training program. The Fillmore/Piru Pyles Camp Orientation was held on Tuesday, May 31 at Fillmore Unified School District Office Auditorium at 6 pm. Pyles is building healthier and happier generations of productive Americans. R.M. Pyles Boys Camp promotes long-term positive behavioral change for low-income, disadvantaged boys by providing a multi-year wilderness camp experience supplemented by year-round mentoring that builds life and instills the values of hard work, education, and positive choices.

 

On May 11th the Fillmore Women's Service Club held their Installation Dinner at the Genmai Japanese Restaurant on Central Avenue. This is their 52nd year of Service to our Community, and Michele Smith proclaimed this to be a “Fruitfull Year”.

Michele conducted the installation of the new board of officers, Susan Banks, President, Glenda DeJarnette, First Vice, Danielle Quintana, Third Vice, Mimi Burns, Fourth Vice, Pam Smith, Recording Secretary and Marilyn Griffin, Treasurer. Unable to attend were Marcia Heerema, Corresponding Secretary and Jeanne Klittich, Parliamentarian.

Our Thanks to Genmai for their good food and service in making this a fun evening for our members.

Any women, 21 years or older are welcome to come visit us, and help make a difference to the lives of people in our community.

 
Debbie Crain Anderson, Class of 71 and wife of Robert (Bob) Anderson, Class of 67 who both grew up in Fillmore and graduated from Fillmore High School presenting Captain Charlie Plumb with the POW bracelet she wore. “What an honor it was to get the opportunity to meet Captain Plumb. Such an honor. I got the bracelet when we were stationed on Guam when Robert was in the Marine Corps. We had just come from the Philippines. I got a bracelet. I wore it, never taking it off until one night we were watching the news. They were covering a flight of released POW’s. As each one walked off the plane their name was called. We got to see Captain Charles Plumb walk off that plane. It was as beautiful and heartwarming then as it was today to get to give him the bracelet that I had not taken off since the day I got it. Our men and women who have served and who serve now, those who suffered in POW camps, our MIA’s, those who have come home missing limbs, those who have returned home and those who did not make it home - they are the heroes. They have all paid the ultimate sacrifice. Thank you to them and their families. Let us NEVER FORGET.”
Debbie Crain Anderson, Class of 71 and wife of Robert (Bob) Anderson, Class of 67 who both grew up in Fillmore and graduated from Fillmore High School presenting Captain Charlie Plumb with the POW bracelet she wore. “What an honor it was to get the opportunity to meet Captain Plumb. Such an honor. I got the bracelet when we were stationed on Guam when Robert was in the Marine Corps. We had just come from the Philippines. I got a bracelet. I wore it, never taking it off until one night we were watching the news. They were covering a flight of released POW’s. As each one walked off the plane their name was called. We got to see Captain Charles Plumb walk off that plane. It was as beautiful and heartwarming then as it was today to get to give him the bracelet that I had not taken off since the day I got it. Our men and women who have served and who serve now, those who suffered in POW camps, our MIA’s, those who have come home missing limbs, those who have returned home and those who did not make it home - they are the heroes. They have all paid the ultimate sacrifice. Thank you to them and their families. Let us NEVER FORGET.”
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Andy Klittich, Scott Beylik and Adrian Palazuelos Rotary Scholarship Committee. Ed McFadden not pictured.
Andy Klittich, Scott Beylik and Adrian Palazuelos Rotary Scholarship Committee. Ed McFadden not pictured.
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Scholarship Recipients from the Sierra High School are Ricardo Lomeli and Cristian Torres. Pictured center left Kyle Wilson, President and Rotarian Dave Andersen who related his trip to India via pictures, to the Club.
Scholarship Recipients from the Sierra High School are Ricardo Lomeli and Cristian Torres. Pictured center left Kyle Wilson, President and Rotarian Dave Andersen who related his trip to India via pictures, to the Club.
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Scott Beylik presented a donation check to Matt Van Breemen, ASB Vice President of Sierra High School, and Louis Lomeli.
Scott Beylik presented a donation check to Matt Van Breemen, ASB Vice President of Sierra High School, and Louis Lomeli.
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Ventura County Library is gearing up for Summer Reading 2016--Read for the Win! From June 1 through August 13, kids and teens are invited to join us for a celebration of sports and achievements. Earn prizes for every 5 hours that you read and enter into an end-of-summer grand prize drawing. Check out all the fun-filled activities happening at www.vencolibrary.org. So get on your mark, get set, read!

 

Let's shift gears a bit and learn about the art of breathing. Breathing stands alone in the metabolic system because, although it is regulated by the primitive brainstem and completely involuntary, the individual can override and control the process. But guess what? In doing so there is a host of other involuntary functions that respond to your voluntary breathing, like heart rate.

Most of us Fillmorians knew about the MayFest Heritage 5K and 10K hosted by the Fillmore Rotary Club. What many of us don’t know is that there is a specific breathing technique for runners. Elite runners are well informed about the most efficient aerobic breathing.

It so happens that the technique I am referring to is precisely the same for meditation. Now you don’t have to breathe any particular way to gain the scientifically proven benefits of meditation. But breathing into the lower diaphragm called “diaphragmatic breathing” is the key to efficiency in running, your health and your well-being.

A primary benefit of meditation is that the meditation practitioner gains greater concentration skills. Why? Because the main goal of meditation is focusing on a particular “thing” and when your mind wanders the practitioner returns to the focused “thing.” The thing I teach students to focus on is their breathing process. The return benefit is that your newly created neuron networks grow your concentration skills. And, when you are voluntarily breathing the process is located in the brain’s cortex. Therefore “diaphragmatic breathing” itself grows new neuronal pathways.

You don’t have to meditate or run to practice behavioral breathing. The practice can be anywhere, anytime. Whether you are a meditation practitioner or runner or not, if you diaphragmatic breathe you become the intermediary of your mind and body. You are in control of the circumstances of your life literally, because you are displacing the autonomic nervous system from its sympathetic excitatory regulation. The result is that you gain an improved immune response to the leading health disorders plaguing contemporary society. There is not enough space for me to detail the wonderful science of diaphragmatic breathing. I do want to close with the runners technique. It’s called “3:2 belly breathing” because the lower lungs are more efficient and ventilated. The runner maintains three-foot strikes on the diaphragmatic inhale consciously swelling the belly and two-foot strikes on the forceful exhale. Besides a greater oxygen vital capacity, the runner's foot strike alternates on each exhale nurturing the art of balance.

Paul Benavidez, MFA

 

This is National Stroke Awareness Month and at this time and throughout the year Community Memorial Health System encourages the community to better understand the risk factors and symptoms of stroke, a leading cause of death and serious long-term disability in the United States.

“Time is crucial in the treatment of stroke, as on average, every 40 seconds someone in the United States has a stroke and roughly every four minutes someone dies from a stroke,” said Stephanie Lara-Jenkins, RN, Stroke Center Coordinator at CMH. “The earlier a stroke is recognized and the patient presents to an emergency department for treatment, the greater chance of recovery.”

Strokes occur when a blood vessel carrying oxygen and vital nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or a blood vessel in the brain ruptures. When this occurs, part of the brain is deprived of blood and oxygen, destroying millions of valuable nerve cells within minutes.

“If you suspect a stroke, remember the word FAST – F-A-S-T,” said Lara-Jenkins. “F is for face - is your face drooping? A is for arms – can you lift both arms? S is for speech – are you slurring your words and T is for time, call 9-1-1 immediately because with stroke, time is brain.”

The primary stroke symptoms include:
• Sudden numbness or weakness on one side of the face or facial drooping
• Sudden numbness or weakness in an arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
• Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech
• Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
• Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
• Sudden severe headache with no known cause

Stroke risk factors include:
• Hypertension
• Atrial Fibrillation
• Diabetes Mellitus
• High Cholesterol
• Inactivity/Obesity
• Coronary Heart Disease
• Excessive Tobacco and/or Alcohol Use
• Blood Disorders, and
• Depression

Stroke is a leading cause of death and serious, long-term disability in the United States. According to the American Stroke Association, approximately 795,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke each year, and 87 percent of these are ischemic strokes. An acute ischemic stroke occurs when an obstruction, such as a blood clot, blocks blood flow to the brain. The obstruction deprives the brain of blood and oxygen, destroying valuable nerve cells in the affected area within minutes. The resulting damage can lead to significant disability including paralysis, speech problems and emotional difficulties.

Treatment to reverse the disabilities caused by stroke may be available if get to the emergency room immediately upon recognition of stroke symptoms. Leading a healthy lifestyle, including lowering risk factors like high blood pressure and weight, can also help reduce the risk of stroke.

Find out if you are at risk of a stroke by attending a free Mini Stroke Screening first Fridays each month from 11am-1pm, by appointment only. For stroke survivors, family and caregivers a Stroke Support Group meets second Wednesdays each month 2-3:15 pm. To take a Stroke Risk Assessment visit www.cmhshealth.org/myhealth or call CMHS’s HealthAware office 805-667-2818.

Community Memorial Health System is a not-for-profit health system, which is comprised of Community Memorial Hospital, Ojai Valley Community Hospital, along with the Centers for Family Health serving various communities within and located in Ventura County, California.

 

To Whom It May Concern:

Enclosed you will find an FPPC Complaint that was filed today against Carla Castilla, Candidate for Ventura County Supervisor – Third District. As a former council member, I understand first hand the importance of raising money for a campaign. Early on in the campaign cycle it had been suggested by members of Ms. Castilla’s campaign and the Democratic Party that Carla should be the only endorse candidate because she was the only one managing her finances. As a public servant and an old hand at politics I decided to review Ms. Castilla’s fillings when they were posted in February and monitored them since. What I discovered are the discrepancies listed in this complaint. I am sharing this with you the media because I feel the public needs to be aware of the manner in which Ms. Castilla and others have been misleading members of our community in making them believe Carla was being a good custodian of her campaign finances, therefore a “chosen” candidate.

As a political leader and elected official, we have a responsibility to our constituents, to manage their money with their best and highest interest in the forefront. We must be transparent and honest with the public. They need to know that they can count on their elected officials, that they have integrity and respect the public and their interests. Carla’s decision to handle her expenses in this manner suggests that she will go to great lengths to get elected including deceive the public. It is in the public interests to learn this truth.

If you are interested in discussing the complaint and the details around it, please feel free to contact me at 805-290-8217.

Sincerely,

Laurie Zuniga
Former Councilmember City of Fillmore

***

Tuesday, May 11 2016

Fair Political Practice Commission
428 J Street, Suite 620
Sacramento, CA 95814

To Whom It May Concern:

Enclosed you will find my complaint against Carla Castilla - Candidate for Ventura County Supervisor, Third District. I have included a complete complaint that includes the following:

1.) A complete complaint

2.) Identified person(s) who have violated the Act. A list of specific provisions I believe the person(s) violated, and the dates on which the violation(s) occurred.

3.) Description of the facts constituting the alleged violation and evidence to support the complaint.

4.) Official signature

Sincerely,
Laura Zuniga

***

***

 
Fillmore FFA held its 4th Annual May Festival Pancake Breakfast Saturday, May 21st from 7:00 - 9:30am at the Fillmore Veterans Memorial Bldg. Many Fillmore residents came to enjoy the breakfast. Photos courtesy Bob Crum.
Fillmore FFA held its 4th Annual May Festival Pancake Breakfast Saturday, May 21st from 7:00 - 9:30am at the Fillmore Veterans Memorial Bldg. Many Fillmore residents came to enjoy the breakfast. Photos courtesy Bob Crum.
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The volunteers and staff who made the FFA Pancake Breakfast a success.
The volunteers and staff who made the FFA Pancake Breakfast a success.
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Rattelsnake season is here and so are the snakes, like this one spotted in Bardsdale. Clear weeds and clutter away from your yard and be aware.
Rattelsnake season is here and so are the snakes, like this one spotted in Bardsdale. Clear weeds and clutter away from your yard and be aware.
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The Fillmore Photography Club for beginners and enthusiasts conducted by photojournalist and digital art photographer Bob Crum. Mini workshops, monthly shooting assignments and photo critiques. Two requirements: A camera and a desire to have fun shooting photos. Watch this space for further details.

 
Presley McLain age 9, a 3rd grader at San Cayetano Elementary, raised $3,038 to be donated to the American Cancer Society.
Presley McLain age 9, a 3rd grader at San Cayetano Elementary, raised $3,038 to be donated to the American Cancer Society.
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Monday, May 16th marked the kick off for the 2016 American Cancer Society’s Fillmore/Piru Relay for Life. It was a beautiful evening at Elkins Golf Course with 27 of the 29 registered teams represented. There was good food, great company and lots of helpful information discussed. The 2016 Relay is scheduled for Saturday, September 24 beginning
at 9:00 AM through Sunday, September 25, 9:00 AM at Shiells Park. If you would like information on registering a team you can contact Faith Lugo, 805-990-8736. Please plan on joining the event in September to help raise money for a wonderful cause.