Help for educators seeking professional development

Independent Travel Study class provides a personalized academic program based on actual or virtual trip
A free seminar called Independent Travel Study for Educators at CLU (California Lutheran University) on five Thursdays from March 1,to March 31 from 7:00pm to 8:00pm. The seminar addresses how educators can obtain professional development or salary advancement units through independent travel study by taking actual or virtual trips using the computer.

Discussions include Education Code 44579 requirements and tax deductions under the current law H.R. 3838. Presented by Dr. Lynnette Shifman, a teacher with over 40 years in the field of education.

Those not able to attend the seminar can obtain seminar information by emailing Dr. Lynnette Shifman: teacher_continue_ed@yahoo.com.

For additional information, contact the CLU web site: http://www.callutheran.edu/education/programs/cpe or email: teacher_continue_ed@yahoo.com ( Free seminar and information provided)

 

Class of 1952’s 65th Class Reunion. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/10/class-of-1952-65th-...

Class of 1957’s 60th Class Reunion. Elkins Ranch, Friday, June 9th from 5 to 10pm. For further information call Mike and Judy Hope at 805-524-0363. If no answer, please leave a detailed message with your questions. The next day, June 10th, the class of '57 is invited to the 104th Alumni Dinner. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1957-60th-...

Class of 1962’s 55th Class Reunion. Class of ’62 reunion questions can be answered by calling Maria “Diaz” Kilgore at 805-647-6274. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1962-55th-...

Class of 1967’s 50th Class Reunion. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1967-50th-...

Class of 1972’s 45th Class Reunion. All inquires for the class of ‘72’s reunion can be answered by calling or emailing Kim Ramsey Murphy at 832-437-5013 murphy75@sbcglobal.net) or Patsy Tripp Murphy 805-524-5958 fillmoreflashesgirl72@gmail.com For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1972-45th-...

Class of 1977’s 40th Class Reunion. Contact person for the 40th reunion is “Mr. Make It Happen” RayMel Lloyd 805-816-3324 raymel_jodie@msn.com For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1977-40th-...

Class of 1982’s 35th Class Reunion. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1982-35th-...

Class of 1987’s 30th Class Reunion. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1987-30th-...

Class of 1992’s 25th Class Reunion. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1992-25th-...

Class of 1997’s 20th Class Reunion. For more information and to reserve your tickets, click here: http://www.fillmorehighalumni.com/reunions/2017/4/12/class-of-1997-20th-...


 
Jack O’Connell and CI President Richard Rush
Jack O’Connell and CI President Richard Rush

Camarillo, CA. - Former State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Jack O’Connell, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters (L.H.D.) from CSU Channel Islands (CI) during their Commencement ceremony scheduled for Saturday, May 21, at 9 a.m.

“We are extremely pleased to present Jack with an honorary doctorate degree during our upcoming Commencement ceremony,” stated President Richard R. Rush. “We would not be here today, providing a top-notch education to thousands of students throughout our region and state, were it not for Jack’s authoring the legislation that helped establish this university.”

O’Connell played an important role in the creation of CSU Channel Islands and in supporting its growth and development. In 1997, O’Connell authored SB 623, which approved the transfer of the former Camarillo State Hospital to the California State University system. In 1998, O’Connell’s second senate bill, SB 1923, was approved by Governor Pete Wilson to facilitate the financing and support of the transition for the 23rd and newest campus of the California State University system. O’Connell’s subsequent support of the University during the following budget process enabled CI to begin building the academic infrastructure that led to the University’s opening in 2002.

Jack O’Connell said, “I am deeply flattered to be recognized with this honorary degree from CSU Channel Islands. As a product of the California State University system, I feel like I have come full circle in my educational and service career – working for the great state of California and Ventura County. By providing a foundation for students seeking a public, higher education, it will enable them to successfully contribute to our state.

"CSU Channel Islands is so fortunate to have the visionary leadership of Dr. Rush and his remarkable team who have worked hard to make CI the institution it is today."

In 2003, a variety of materials from O’Connell’s tenure in the State Senate and Assembly legislative period were donated to CSU Channel Islands’ John Spoor Broome Library to initiate an archival collection. Most recently, he supplied documents related to his recent position as State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Some of his collection is partially opened to the public now with complete processing of the documentation expected by 2014.

O’Connell was born in Glen Cove, New York. In 1958, he moved with his family to Southern California, where he attended public schools. O’Connell grew up in Oxnard and graduated from Oxnard High School. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from California State University, Fullerton and earned his secondary teaching credential from California State University, Long Beach. O’Connell returned to his high school alma mater to teach government classes.

His political career began with his election to the Santa Barbara County School Board. Starting in 1982, he served six terms in the California Assembly representing the Central Coast-based 35th district and was then elected to two terms in the State Senate, serving the 18th district. He was elected as State Superintendent of Public Instruction in 2002 and overwhelmingly re-elected in 2006.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 


 
Concerns, Issues regarding Building/Inspection, Safety, Fire, to be brought before State Politicians

I have been contacted by someone with contacts at the State level who "will be speaking with the Politicians in Sacramento" in the coming weeks and specifically wants to hear from residents, parents, students, staff of FUSD on
any issues regarding Building, Safety, Fire etc within FUSD.

If you have any concerns regarding issues at any site, or with building/inspection etc.
Please write something up, indicate which site and please be specific about the problem or issue.

We need this info by the end of this week.
Please email to schoolmatters@fillmoregazette.com
or post as a comment here. I can only accept comments with names so that I can verify the issue, and contact you if necessary. If you send an email and indicate that you wish to remain anonymous that is fine.

Happy Monday, Kim

 


 
Paula Phillips, from Right Road Kids, came to speak to the students about what a good citizen is and how being a good citizen can help not only the students, but others around them in their community.
Paula Phillips, from Right Road Kids, came to speak to the students about what a good citizen is and how being a good citizen can help not only the students, but others around them in their community.
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Paula Phillips, from Right Road Kids, spoke to San Cayetano students about what they should do when faced with a challenge and how teamwork can help them reach their goals.
Paula Phillips, from Right Road Kids, spoke to San Cayetano students about what they should do when faced with a challenge and how teamwork can help them reach their goals.
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On Monday, February 7, 2011, San Cayetano School recognized good citizenship and character at their Peacebuilder Assembly. Paula Phillips, from Right Road Kids, came to speak to the students about what a good citizen is and how being a good citizen can help not only the students, but others around them in their community. She spoke to the students about what they should do when faced with a challenge and how teamwork can help them reach their goals. Paula continued the Peacebuilder challenge to the students for them to think of a way individually, or as a class to find a new way to be a Peacebuilder in their lives. Paula told the students she would be excited to hear about and see what they had come up with in May when she comes back to visit San Cayetano for the Peacebuilder Celebration of Service. ASB President, Cali Wyand, assisted Paula in handing out the Peacebuilder Awards. The Peacebuilders for February are: Joseph Cervantes, Alexis Andrade, Rosalyn Diaz, Jose Suarez, Austin Gunter, Leslie Garcia, Dulce Rodriguez, Diego Ruiz, Bryan Sanchez, Jessica Nava, Joe Rivas, Amie Sanchez, Brianna Sanchez, Robert McElroy, Melia Galindo, Priscilla Almanza, Kasey Crawford, Antonio Villalobos, Kiana Valenzuela, and Erika Garza. At the primary grade assembly, Cali then announced to the students that John Paul Pet is sponsoring the San Cayetano Character Counts Award of a $100.00 savings bond. Violet Padilla, from Mrs. Fluke’s class, was chosen by the kindergarten teachers as a model of outstanding behavior and kindness to the other students. She was recognized with a certificate and the savings bond will be ordered and mailed to her. To conclude the assembly, the students were reminded to turn in their Perfect Attendance tickets. Each month all students who come to school, each day, on time, are given an orange raffle ticket. The students place their tickets in a box and one ticket is drawn. The student whose ticket is drawn is given a backpack full of supplies. Each month, the tickets will be put into a larger box that will be kept until the end of the year. In June, Mrs. Marholin, the principal, will draw from the tickets to give away two new bicycles. Julia Pace won the Perfect Attendance Award.

 


 
California State University Channel Islands
California State University Channel Islands

Camarillo, CA. - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will present a symposium and week of programs entitled Facing Our Bodies that will run from Feb. 21-25. The series, created by Dennis Downey, Associate Professor of Sociology, is scheduled to bring awareness to National Eating Disorder Awareness Week, and will feature single speaker and panel programs dealing primarily with maintaining a healthy body image. The symposium and programs are free and open to the public.

On Thursday, Feb. 24 from 3-4:45 p.m., in the John Spoor Broome Library, an interdisciplinary panel discussion will be presented focusing on women’s bodies, women’s experiences related to their bodies, and the social dynamics that shape those experiences, “Women and the Body: An Interdisciplinary Symposium.”

The symposium will be followed with a presentation from 5-6 p.m. by Justine J. Reel, a member of the Department of Health Education & Promotion at the University of Utah. Reel will present: "An Organic Approach to Positive Body Image: Empowering the Soul and Rejecting an Eating Disordered Society." Reel is the co-author of Hidden Faces of Eating Disorders, as well as numerous articles and chapters addressing issues related to distorted body image and eating disorders.

For a complete list of programs being offered visit: https://events.csuci.edu/wv3/wv3_servlet/urd/run/wv_event.DayList?evdt=2...

Limited parking is available on campus. A daily permit is $6. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road parking lot in Camarillo with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the VISTA Bus to the campus; the fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

For additional information contact Dennis Downey, Associate Professor of Sociology, at CSU Channel Islands at 805-437-3315 or dennis.downey@csuci.edu.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 


 

Camarillo, CA. - The CSU Council on Ocean Affairs, Science and Technology (COAST), which deals with marine and coastal research and education, is introducing the new COAST Geospatial Research, Education and Technology Network, headed by CI’s Christopher Cogan, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science & Resource Management together with Corey Garza, Assistant Professor of Science and Environmental Policy at CSU Monterey Bay.

The COAST Geospatial network is one of six networks being established to engage faculty and students across the CSU system to facilitate specific areas of coastal management. The Geospatial Network is currently assembling a team of CSU faculty interested in geospatial research and teaching as it pertains to ecosystem-based management of the coastal zone.

The focus of the group will be to study the fragile environment where the ocean and the land meet, to study the various ecosystems that make up that environment, to understand how they are integrated and to find a way to guide management efforts such as coastal and marine spatial planning, and coastal zoning. Designed as a CSU system-wide team, Network activities span the entire California coast from Humboldt and Del Norte Counties in the north to San Diego County in the south. By inviting participants from the 23 CSU campuses who share interest in this area of study, the network will be able to have the widest selection of academic talent, resources and assets.

The team will be interdisciplinary, involving experts from a variety of academic disciplines so not only will the environmental science area be represented but public policy as well. Another aspect of the Network will be to improve teaching methods and research in the field. The group will be seeking out projects that are relevant to the skills of the team.

As Cogan explained, “Due to our coastal location and common interests, here at CI we have had the advantage of close working relationships with many state and federal agencies. The Navy, the Park Service and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement are all ongoing partners as we deal with coastal management education and research. The Geospatial Network activity is another example of our long range commitment to these partners.” He added that the team will look to “improve coastal management and policy, through better understanding the biodiversity of all of the terrestrial and marine ecosystems involved in this fragile environment.”

Cogan said that another important benefit of the network will be to graduate students who are knowledgeable in this field and will be a resource to companies, agencies, and research facilities involved in California’s coastal management.

For contact information or additional material on the COAST Geospatial Research, Education and Technology Network,visit: http://www.calstate.edu/coast/GREAT/

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 
PIRU SCHOOL, 3811 CENTER STREET, PIRU, CALIFORNIA
Fillmore Unified School District
Fillmore Unified School District

FILLMORE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 2011
6:30 P.M. - REGULAR MEETING APPROXIMATELY 8:45 P.M. – CLOSED SESSION PIRU SCHOOL, 3811 CENTER STREET, PIRU, CALIFORNIA

AGENDA
The public may review or request a copy of support materials provided to the Board Members where the word materials appears.
6:30 p.m.
A. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
B. ROLL CALL
C. CLARIFICATION OF AGENDA AND TIME ALLOCATIONS FOR DISCUSSION ITEMS
D. PUBLIC COMMENT ON AGENDA ITEMS AND NONAGENDA ITEMS, PETITIONS
This is the time and place to address the school board. State law prohibits the Board from acting on issues not included on the agenda; however, requests may be made for discussion of specific topics at subsequent meetings.
E. PUBLIC HEARING AND ACTION ON INITIAL PROPOSALS FOR BARGAINING OF FUTA AND FUSD/FUSD AND FUTA
1. Public Hearing on Initial Proposal of the Fillmore Unified Teachers Association, CTA, NEA for Successor Contract Commencing July 1, 2011 (Materials)
2. Board Action to Receive Initial Proposal of the Fillmore Unified Teachers Association, CTA, NEA for a Successor Contract Commencing July 1, 2011
3. Public Hearing on CONTINUED »

 
CLU dean co-authored national study
George J. Petersen
George J. Petersen

THOUSAND OAKS, CA. - The dean of California Lutheran University’s School of Education and a panel of superintendents will discuss new research on the jobs of those leading public school districts at 6 p.m. Thursday, March 10.

George J. Petersen will discuss “The American School Superintendent: 2010 Decennial Study” in CLU’s Lundring Events Center. The CLU dean is one of the report’s five authors.

Released in December, the study documented dramatic changes in public school leadership. It revealed that today’s superintendents are more likely to be female, older and drawing a pension while working full time than those 10 years ago. Nearly half are planning to retire in the next five years. The study also reveals the varied challenges faced by superintendents, including the differences between those in charge of small and large school systems.

Other key findings include:

· Their jobs are increasingly diverse as a result of population changes, the explosion of technology, globalization, and increased expectations.
· Minorities become superintendents later and are twice as likely to report discrimination in their pursuit of the job.
· Job satisfaction among superintendents remains very high.

Panel members will then share their experiences and the challenges they face. The superintendents are Jeffrey L. Baarstad of Conejo Valley Unified School District, Julian D. Crocker of the San Luis Obispo County Office of Education, Robert P. Fraisse of Somis Union School District, David Gomez of Santa Paula Unified School District, Stanley C. Mantooth of the Ventura County Office of Education, Ellen Smith of Moorpark Unified School District and Trudy Tuttle-Arriaga of Ventura Unified School District.

Sponsored by American Association of School Administrators, the research is part of a series of studies that has been conducted every 10 years since the 1920s. They are the most cited references in school administration literature.

Petersen is the author or coauthor of two books and more than 100 book chapters, articles, research papers and commissioned reports. Much of his scholarly work has focused on district superintendents and their beliefs, roles and work.

Lundring Events Center is in Gilbert Sports and Fitness Center, which is located north of Olsen Road near Campus Drive on the Thousand Oaks campus.

Admission is free, but reservations are required by March 4. Contact Joan Jedrzejek at jedrzeje@callutheran.edu or (805) 493-3160.

###

 

The Ventura County SELPA announces a public hearing to review the proposed Annual Budget Plan and Program Descriptors/Annual Service Plan for Special Education. The program descriptors list the types of special education services provided in the SELPA. The SELPA includes all school districts and the County Office of Education in Ventura County and the Las Virgenes Unified School District in Los Angeles County. The Public Hearing will be March 7, 2011 at 5:15 p.m. Location: 5100 Adolfo Road, Camarillo, CA 93012. Questions, call (805) 437-1560. For more information about the SELPA visit our website at www.venturacountyselpa.com

 

Applications are available for the Miss Fillmore/Miss Teen Fillmore Pageant. Applications are available in the Office at the Middle School, at Fillmore High Schools Student Store, the Fillmore Chamber of Commerce or by contacting Pageant Director Lori McLain at #524-4432. The Mother/Daughter Tea is scheduled for Wednesday, February 23rd 6:30PM at the Memorial Building. The first practice begins Wednesday, March 2nd.

 
Fillmore Middle School’s Students of the Month.
Fillmore Middle School’s Students of the Month.
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Ms. Dewey’s 4th/5th grade class at San Cayetano reach for their best ideas and programming skills when working with robotics.
Ms. Dewey’s 4th/5th grade class at San Cayetano reach for their best ideas and programming skills when working with robotics.
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Perfect Attendance Winner this month from San Cayetano is Julia Pace, a third grader.
Perfect Attendance Winner this month from San Cayetano is Julia Pace, a third grader.
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California State University Channel Islands
California State University Channel Islands

Camarillo, CA. - Dr. Donald Rodriguez, Associate Professor of Environmental Science & Resource Management at CSU Channel Islands (CI) was invited to Washington, D.C. to speak to the National Parks Foundation regarding the issue of engaging college-age youth with the National Parks Service (NPS). In particular, the group wanted to know how to make the parks relevant to 18 to 25-year-old minority students who had very little history of using the parks for recreation and other outdoor activities.

Rodriguez returned to campus and, with a grant from the Santa Monica Mountains Fund, put together an interdisciplinary research team consisting of himself, Dr. Jose Alamillo, Associate Professor Chicana/o Studies and Dr. Tracylee Clarke, Assistant Professor of Communication. They hired one Hispanic student from each of their respective academic areas (Iliana Espinoza, Jose Tlaxcuapan, and Paul Paredes), to work with the research team throughout the project and to explore minority participation among their peer groups. This work is part of the students’ Capstone projects.

After completing the analysis phase of the project in the fall, the full team is currently engaged in compiling culturally responsive outreach activities and creating a template for use with other park staffs. The student team is conducting peer focus groups to ask such questions as, “Are the parks meaningful for you and, if not, why not?” Not only are the parks interested in this kind of data, but also manufacturers of sporting goods and recreational equipment like R.E.I., the Nature Conservancy and the Wilderness Society.

The outdoor community wants to CONTINUED »

 

Camarillo, CA. – The Environmental Science & Resource Management program at CSU Channel Islands (CI) will present a 2011 Spring Lecture Series, a six-part program starting Tuesday, Feb. 8. The lectures are free and open to the public and will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. as follows:

Know Your Fishermen with speaker Stephanie Munz, of Commercial Fisherman of Santa Barbara

· Tuesday, Feb. 8, John Spoor Broome Library, room 1750

Parasites and Ecosystems with speaker Kevin Lafferty of USGS and UC Santa Barbara

· Tuesday, Feb. 22, John Spoor Broome Library, room 1360

Green Tech: Networking and Control Technologies in Energy Saving Applications (co-sponsored with the Martin V. Smith School of Business & Economics) with speaker Chris Stanfield of Echelon Corporation

Tuesday, March 8, John Spoor Broome Library, room 2325

Kitchen Literacy: forgetting and remembering where food comes from with speaker Ann Vileisis, historian and author

· Tuesday, April 5, campus venue to be determined

The Future of World’s Birds in the 21st Century with speaker Cagan Sekercioglu of the University of Utah

· Tuesday, April 19, John Spoor Broome Library, room 1360

Moby-Dick and the Mythology of Oil with speaker Robert Wagner, independent petroleum consultant

· Tuesday, April 26, John Spoor Broome Library, room 1360

To make a reservation for any of the lectures contact Mary Devins at 805-437-3253 or mary.devins@csuci.edu.

Limited parking is available on campus. A daily permit is $6. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road parking lot in Camarillo with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the VISTA Bus to the campus; the fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

# # #

About California State University Channel Islands

CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 
California State University Channel Islands
California State University Channel Islands

Camarillo, CA. - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will commemorate the 2008 killing of 15-year-old gay Oxnard student Lawrence King with a candlelight vigil on Tuesday, February 15, on the CI campus.

The evening’s program will feature a showing of The Laramie Project at 6 p.m. at CI’s John Spoor Broome Library, room 2325. The program is presented by Spectrum, the School of Education, the English program, the Centers for Multicultural Engagement and Community Engagement, Associated Students, Inc., Housing & Residential Education, and Multicultural Programs.

For the second year the student gay/straight alliance, Spectrum, in partnership with Julia Balén, Associate Professor of English, and her English/Gender Studies Class, offers a program to remember Lawrence King. This year they also commemorate the wrongful murder of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old gay student from the University of Wyoming. The Laramie Project, a film of the play by Moises Kaufman, will be shown followed by a discussion. Balén stated that, “The University needs to be a forum for dialogue, a place where challenging issues can be intelligently discussed.”

The discussion, an exploration of how we might end violence and harassment directed at lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in schools and communities, will be followed by a candlelight vigil.

CI emphasizes the issue of civil discourse and what it means in campus life, particularly in light of the current national conversation about civility and democracy. This program considers what respecting differences means.

The program is free and open to the public. For additional information please contact Julia Balen at julia.balen@csuci.edu.

Persons with special needs or conditions who would like to request an accommodation should contact 805-437-3331 or e-mail accommodations@csuci.edu.

Limited parking is available on campus. A daily permit is $6. Free parking is available at the Camarillo Metrolink Station/Lewis Road parking lot in Camarillo with bus service to and from the campus. Riders should board the VISTA Bus to the campus; the fare is $1.25 each way. Buses arrive and depart from the Camarillo Metrolink Station every 30 minutes from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Friday. For exact times, check the schedule at www.goventura.org.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 
Curriculum Audits at Piru and Middle School; Graduation Requirements; Budget Update Etc.

Below are several segments from the January 18, 2011 School Board Meeting. Our goal is to start recording all meetings, and get the videos posted promptly. You'll notice that we've "cut" it up so that you can watch the segments that you're interested in.
Remember the next meeting is February 15th at Piru Elementary School.

Future Farmers of America report by Brooke Aguirre and "Students First" award to Janice Schieferle

Curriculum Audit Report from Principals at: Piru Elementary School and Fillmore Middle School:

Student Rep (Sean Chandler) and Board Member Reports:

Discussion on Jeff Sweeney's suggestion to begin to examine graduation requirements:
Graduation Requirements

Budget Update:

 
“The Lottery”
“The Lottery”
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Documentary explores education crisis in U.S.

THOUSAND OAKS, CA. - California Lutheran University will screen a documentary on the efforts of four families to get into a charter school at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 23.

“The Lottery” will be shown in Lundring Events Center on the Thousand Oaks campus as part of the Reel Justice Film Series.

In a country where 58 percent of African American fourth graders are functionally illiterate, “The Lottery” uncovers failures of traditional public schools that cause hundreds of thousands of parents to attempt to flee the system every year.

“The Lottery” follows four of these families from Harlem and the Bronx who have entered their children in a charter school lottery. Out of thousands of hopefuls, only a small minority will win what they see as a chance for a better future.

Directed by Madeleine Sackler and shot by award-winning cinematographer Wolfgang Held, “The Lottery” explores a ferocious debate surrounding the education reform movement. Interviews with politicians and educators explain not only the crisis in public education but also why it is fixable. A call to action to avert a catastrophe in the education of American children, “The Lottery” makes the case that any child can succeed.

The Reel Justice Film Series, which examines the themes of equality and social justice, will continue with “The Stoning of Soraya M.” on March 7, “8: The Mormon Proposition” on March 30, and “Living Downstream” on April 6.

Lundring Events Center is located in Gilbert Sports and Fitness Center, which is north of Olsen Road near Campus Drive.

CLU’s Center for Equality and Justice and Black Student Union are sponsoring the free event. For more information, contact Sam Thomas at sthomas@callutheran.edu or (805) 493-3693.

 
Budget Breakdown and Site Budgets

School Matters Post

Questions received via email:

“How much of the budget is spent on Administrative salaries and compensation?”
- FUSD Teacher

“It may be helpful to show a breakdown of expenses in the District, including books and supplies, facilities [and so on]”. – Concerned Resident

First, I need to make a correction; in a previous blog post I indicated that the budget for FUSD is $35 million. But according to the projected, unaudited budget (I have requested a copy of the audited budget) dated June 2010 for this current school year the total General Fund budget is $30.7 million but remember budgets are fluid and ever changing, and in school districts they are based on how many students sit in classrooms each day, so we really don’t know the years budget, until the year is over. Make sense?

So if we first look at the pie chart included in the Unaudited Budget dated June 2010 the District reports that it spends 86% of its budget on personnel. According to another chart “management” (salaries only, excluding benefits) expenses makes up 6% of the total budget. Compare that to 42% for certificated employees (teachers) or 4% for books and supplies.
When we look at the actual numbers, based on a print out from the District office dated September 2010 here are the actual numbers, these numbers include salary and benefits representing the total cost to the District for each position.

Certificated Non Management Salaries: $12.4 million
Classified Non Management Salaries: 4.5
Management/Supervisor Salaries: 1.9
Employee Benefits 6.7
Books and Supplies 1.3
Operating 2.7
Capital/Other 0.3
Total Expenditures 29.7
Ending Balance 1.0
Total General Fund 30.7

Administrative Salaries, per report from District office dated September 2010.

Salary Total Expense
Superintendent: $144,046 **$180,293***

**Note: the salary was reported to me upon request. But I have been unable to obtain a report on the actual District expense of all of the benefits and compensation for the position of Superintendent. So, this number of Total Expense for the position of Superintendent is an estimate. Here is how I calculated it:
$144,046 salary
+$ 4,000 – car allowance, per contract dated 2006, $400.00 per month. The contract does not specify if this is paid for 12 months, or only for 10 months during the school year. I assumed that it would only be during the school year so I used $400 x 10 months= $4,000.00)
+$1200.00 – per contract the maximum paid annually for Term Life Insurance
+$1,829 MEDI *
+$920 SUI*
+$3,057 WC*
+$14,871 H/W*
+$10,370 STRS & STRSC*
• These are all estimates taken from the District expense for the Asst. Superintendent position, Educational services. I thought these numbers would be somewhat comparable, if a little on the low side.

=$180,293.00 Total Expense to the District ESTIMATED. Any additional expenses incurred associated with duties are compensated, as well as any additional costs of an annual physical examination not covered by the health insurance provided.
Salary / Total District Expense
Asst. Superintendent, Educ. Services $125,654 / $156,691
After Schl Prog. Coordinator/Stdnt Services $95,456 / $122,626
Asst. Superintendent, HR Director $96,082 / $123,293
Special Ed Coordinator $89,351 / $112,629
Asst. Superintendent, Fiscal Services $124,452 / $154,483
Director, Budget and Accounting $87,360 / $119,965
Director, Facilities and Construction $81,853 / $113,158
Director of Neighborhood for Learning $55,611 / $83,694
Director of Child Nutrition $70,973 / $98,034
Elem. Principal Piru $80,181 / $91, 836
Elem. Principal San Cayetano $92,259 / $110,800
Elem. Principal Sespe $92,259 / $118,986
Elem. Principal Mountain Vista $92,259 / $105,599
Sierra High Principal $81,119 / $115,315
Fillmore High School Principal $111,785 / $141,014
FHS Asst. Principal $87,054 / $110,036
FHS Asst. Principal $100,984 / $128,838

Sub-Total: $2,243,756
Superintendents Salary & Expenses= $180,293.00
Total: $2,424,049
There are some administrative positions that were not included in the report I received. I will be requesting these reports in the next few months. If there is a position that you are curious about, either request the info from the District office, or let me know. All information on compensation of any employee is a matter of public record.

Site Budgets: I thought this was an easy way view the Districts budget; again this is all based on the unaudited budget dated June 2010.

Site Budgets:

Mountain Vista:
Enrollment Projected: 554
Actual as of January 11, 2011 (per the ConAp): 578

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries; 1,650,414 / 1,555,191
Classified Salaries 101,079 / 101,230
Employee Benefits 506,705 / 530,320
Books and Supplies 33,267 / 16,210
Other Services 158,593 / 117,543
Capital Outlay 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 2,450,058 / 2,320,494

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated /10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 83,953 / 56,945
School Based Coordinated Programs 88,721 / 0
English Language Acq. Program 6,173 / 6,273
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 37,853 / 10,983
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 25,945
Total Expenditures 216,700 / 100,146

Piru:
Enrollment projected: 346
Actual as of January 11, 2011 (per the ConAp): 306

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries: 1,028,231 / 992,526
Classified Salaries: 86,319 / 87,104
Employee Benefits: 330,166 / 341,676
Books and Supplies 18,143 / 18,268
Other Services 81,996 / 64,236
Capital Outlay 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 1,544,855 / 1,503,810

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated /10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 70,254 / 51,079
School Based Coordinated Programs 72,497 / 0
English Language Acq. Program 3,243 / 4,827
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 28,039 / 27,840
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 55,221
Total Expenditures 174,033 / 138,967

San Cayetano:
Enrollment projected: 482
Actual as of January 11, 2011 (per ConAp): 525

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries: 1,411,118 / 1,312,359
Classified Salaries: 106,246 / 110,882
Employee Benefits: 459,975 / 483,695
Books and Supplies 25,361 / 12,446
Other Services 126,971 / 113,693
Capital Outlay 3,750 / 0
Total Expenditures 2,133,421 / 2,033,075

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated /10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 68,486 / 49,218
School Based Coordinated Programs 76,621 / 0
English Language Acq. Program 6,277 / 6,067
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 28,506 / 28,361
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 53,218
Newhall Grant 10,097 / 0
Total Expenditures 189,987 / 136,864

Sespe:
Enrollment Projected: 470
Actual as of January 11, 2011 (per ConAp): 472

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries: 1,449,887 / 1.264,003
Classified Salaries: 115,502 / 114,046
Employee Benefits: 461,931 / 448,316
Books and Supplies 24,834 / 16,941
Other Services 72,658 / 70,975
Capital Outlay 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 2,124,812 / 1,914,281

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated /10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 62,658 / 49,792
School Based Coordinated Programs 79,041 / 0
English Language Acq. Program 7,219 / 7,188
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 31,310 / 31,067
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 53,902
Total Expenditures 180,228 / 141,949

Fillmore Middle School
Projected Enrollment: 766
Actual as of January 11, 2011: 806

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries: 2,238,901 / 2,158,758
Classified Salaries: 187,842 / 187,552
Employee Benefits: 716,065 / 760,320
Books and Supplies 46,031 / 30,244
Other Services 204,652 / 162,682
Capital Outlay 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 3,393,491 / 3,299,556

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated / 10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 128,854 / 79,552
School Based Coordinated Programs 127,523 / 0
English Language Acq. Program 30,340 / 28,689
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 42,836 / 42,622
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 86,103
Total Expenditures 329,553 / 236,966

Sierra High School
Projected enrollment: 60
Actual as of January 11, 2011: 68

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries: 297,187 / 282,896
Classified Salaries: 16,359 / 16,396
Employee Benefits: 111,949 / 118,849
Books and Supplies 10,302 / 4,111
Other Services 30,468 / 21,180
Capital Outlay 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 466,265 / 443,432

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated / 10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 8,119 / 7,467
School Based Coordinated Programs 10,991 / 0
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 4,137 / 2,319
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 7,581
Total Expenditures 23,247 / 17,367

Fillmore High School
Projected Enrollment: 1085
Actual as of January 11, 2011: 1082

Unrestricted General Fund 2009-10 Estimated / 2010-11 Proposed
Certificated Salaries: 3,064,767 / 2,886,396
Classified Salaries: 337,124 / 362,991
Employee Benefits: 1,031,160 / 1,063,312
Books and Supplies 197,562 / 105,209
Other Services 366,900 / 314,871
Capital Outlay 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 4,997,513 / 4,732,779

Restricted General Fund
Expenditures By Program 09-10 Estimated / 10-11 Proposed
Title I Basic Aid 150,020 / 98,725
School Based Coordinated Programs 164,003 / 0
Title II Vocational Education 26,984 / 24,142
Economic Impact Aid-LEP 38,632 / 38,389
Economic Impact Aid-SCE 0 / 106,728
Agricultural Vocational Education 9,979 / 9,939
California High School Exit Exam 0 / 0
Total Expenditures 389,618 / 277,923

So there you are.

Do you think the money is being spent well?

My next step on this is to get job descriptions of each of the administrative positions.

Remember School Matters.
Post comments below, or send questions and comments to:
Schoolmatters@fillmoregazette.com
Fillmore Gazette Attn: School Matters, 408 Orchard Street, Fillmore 93015

Thanks for reading.
Kimberly

 

At last nights School Board meeting Board members Tony Prado, Lucy Rangel ad Dave Wilde all commented on this video that Assist. Superintendent Director of Educational Services Katy Hadley showed at a recent workshop they attended.

The video did float around facebook a while back. Check it out:

***************
So what do you think?
It seems a pretty daunting task to prepare students for jobs that don't even exist yet with technology that will be outdated by the time they graduate from high school.
But what about the idea that instead of preparing students for jobs.... (Ok let's really get outside the box here) public education needs to shift its goal to preparing students to become.... thinkers, problem solvers, and entrepreneurs. To provide them with skills to think on their feet and to meet the demands of whatever is thrown their way. What about preparing students to have the confidence to question the status quo? To imagine that success is not always defined by the amount of money you make or what corporation your work for but by what you contribute to your community or even something as seemingly small as making a child smile.

I was recently listening to an author from India being interviewed about the great progress happening in India. He spoke about how every single successful person he knew in India, who had risen up out of the chaste (or class) of their parents... every single one worked for themselves. They created their own job. This got me thinking, in the US we hear all about job creation, and many expect our governments to seemingly wave a magic wand, or maybe a dollar, and *poof* create hundreds of thousands of jobs. But what about the idea that folks need to start preparing to climb out of that box, to think about filling the needs of their community, and creating their own jobs. Doesnt' work for every single person, but think about even the effect of a small shift. Hummmm.

Look around our world. Egypt. Tunisia. Los Angeles. And sometimes even yes, our own Communities of Fillmore, Piru and all of Ventura County. Public Education needs to shift its goals, challenge students to build their confidence in ways that they can find their passion, their contribution, their voice and take it out into their community in a positive way. It’s beyond jobs. It comes down to do we want kids trained to get an A, B or a C (I think our current system even trains some kids to get D’s and F’s…) or do we want them to be confident enough to fail… and keep going…. and get up again and keep going.

What would they do if they knew they would not fail?

What would they do if there were TRULY no stupid questions?

Maybe they just might solve the world’s problems that we don’t even know exist yet.
Just maybe.