Graduation Ticket Distribution, Budget Cuts
Fillmore Unified School District
Fillmore Unified School District

FILLMORE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT SPECIAL MEETING OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2011
5:30 P.M. – CLOSED SESSION 6:30 P.M. – SPECIAL BOARD MEETING 627 SESPE AVENUE, FILLMORE, CALIFORNIA

AGENDA
5:30 p.m.
I. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
II. ROLL CALL
III. PUBLIC COMMENT ON CLOSED SESSION AND NONAGENDA ITEMS,
PETITIONS
This is the time and place to address the Board. State law prohibits the Board from acting on issues not included on the agenda; however, requests may be made for discussion of specific topics at subsequent meetings.
IV. CLOSED SESSION
The Board of Education will meet from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. to consider matters appropriate for Closed Session in accordance with Government Code Sections 3549.1, 54956.7 through 54957.7 and Education Code Section 35146. If the Board does not complete Closed Session discussions at this time, the Board may adjourn to Closed Session at the end of the regular meeting. DISCLOSURE OF ITEM(S) TO BE DISCUSSED IN CLOSED SESSION Labor/Negotiations (Government Code 54957.6)
o Update; Direction to District Negotiators (Jeff Sweeney, Mike Bush, Todd Schieferle, Margaret Chidester) for negotiations with the Fillmore Unified Teachers Association (FUTA), the California School Employees Association (CSEA), Confidential Employees, and District Administration. Personnel Matters (Government Code 54957)
o Hiring, Evaluating, Discipline, or Dismissal Public Employee Performance Evaluation: Superintendent (The Board and
Superintendent meet periodically to provide feedback to one another concerning
the achievement of goals.)
In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Superintendent's Office at (805) 524-6038. Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the district to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting. [In accordance with Government Code 54961 and Board Bylaw 9320(a).]

6:30 P.M.
V. RECONVENE TO OPEN SESSION Any Action From Closed Session
VI. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
VII. CLARIFICATION OF AGENDA AND TIME ALLOCATIONS FOR DISCUSSION ITEMS
VIII. PUBLIC COMMENT ON AGENDA ITEMS AND NONAGENDA ITEMS
This is the time and place to address the school board on any items on the open session agenda. State law prohibits the Board from acting on issues not included on the agenda; however, requests may be made for discussion of specific topics at subsequent meetings.
6:45 P.M.
IX. ACTION ITEM
1. Approve Recommendation for Ticket Distribution CONTINUED »

 


 
 


 
Last week Fillmore Middle School celebrated Earth Day. Above, five students show how you can Reduce, Reuse,
and Recycle, and they also offered cupcakes.
Last week Fillmore Middle School celebrated Earth Day. Above, five students show how you can Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle, and they also offered cupcakes.
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A robot made out of plastic bottles.
A robot made out of plastic bottles.
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Starts April 29th

Jumping rope is possibly the most beneficial exercise a person can do! The 6th graders at Fillmore Middle School are having a Jump-A-Thon on Friday, April 29th, after CST testing. Students are raising money through flat donations between now and April 29th. Money earned will go to new PE equipment such as: basketballs, footballs, soccer balls, and jump ropes; for our 6th grade students. If you are interested in donating or helping out, please contact Fillmore Middle School at 524-6070, e-mail hatwood@fillmore.k12.ca.us, or simply send a check to 543 “A” St. PO Box 697 Fillmore, Ca 93016. Any and all help is greatly appreciated! Thank you!

 


 

Today, the following comment was submitted via email to all School Board Members, and to the Fillmore Unified Teachers Association (FUTA) and the Fillmore chapter of California School Employees Association (CSEA),

FUSD Board Members, FUTA and CSEA Presidents,

I wanted to make this statement at tonight’s board meeting but business is taking me out of town. It’s regarding a proposal for the budget cuts that I believe all parties should seriously consider. I’m hoping one or more board members will ask Mike Bush to run a few scenarios with actual numbers to see what it looks like. Even if you don’t fully agree with or see challenges to the proposal, I believe it’s necessary to consider all options.

Thank you and here is the statement:

April 19th, 2011

My name is Scott Duckett.

I’m speaking tonight as a private citizen concerned about the budget cuts. At a recent board meeting, both board members and cabinet members requested that any ideas regarding budget cuts be brought forward. In response to that, I’d like to make a proposal. The proposal has been heard by at least one board member; however I want to make sure it’s heard by all board members and union leadership, and has an opportunity to be publically vetted. Before I tell you what the proposal is, I’d like to first tell you the top three reasons why this proposal should be considered.

The first reason to adopt this proposal is NOT ONE SERVICE TO ONE STUDENT WILL BE LOST. Not one athletic program, not one classroom, not one thing students enjoy now will be lost. The repeated goal of board members to keep the cuts as far as away from the students as possible will be realized.

The second reason to adopt this proposal is NOT A SINGLE DISTRICT EMPLOYEE WILL LOSE THEIR JOB. Nobody. Not one person. All layoff notices would be rescinded.

And the third reason to adopt this proposal is IT’S FAIR TO ALL DISTRICT EMPLOYEES. No one individual or group caused the budget cuts, and under this proposal, no one individual or group will be forced to take more cuts or lose their job. In other words, all cuts are equal across the entire district.

Here’s the proposal. Every district employee, from the Superintendent on down, takes an equal percentage salary cut. The exact percentage everyone takes depends on the size of the budget gap. I didn’t have actual numbers to work with, so I made some estimates. If salaries and benefits make up roughly 90% of the district’s $30 million dollar budget, that’s approximately $27 million in salaries and benefits. If everyone district wide took a 3% salary cut, the district would save $810,000. If everyone took a 5% cut, the district would save 1.3 Million. If everyone took a 7% cut, the district would save nearly $2 million dollars, and so on.

I understand this proposal is unique, and will come with its own unique set of challenges. But I believe going through another round of “budget cuts business as usual” will only result in the painful process where seeing now and that we’ve all witnessed over the past few years. It’s a process that results in cuts that are often unfair to individuals and groups within the district, it results in valued district employees losing their jobs, and ends with cuts being made that directly affect students.

Thank you.

 


 
Sessions will cover legal and practical responses
Mindy Puopolo
Mindy Puopolo

THOUSAND OAKS, CA. - A workshop on domestic violence and child abuse will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, May 6, at California Lutheran University.

Responses to Victimization: A Workshop Exploring Legal and Practical Responses to Family Violence and Victimization will be held in Lundring Events Center on the Thousand Oaks campus.

Ventura County District Attorney Greg Totten will give the keynote address at the luncheon.

Participants can choose five of 10 sessions to attend. Mindy Puopolo and Morris Eagle with CLU’s graduate psychology program will discuss the psychology behind domestic violence and Michael Gerson, an assistant professor of psychology at CLU, will cover the psychology behind child abuse. Catherine Duggan, director of the Ventura County District Attorney’s Office Victims’ Assistance Program, will talk about victims’ rights, and Sean Schoneman will make a presentation on Casa Pacifica’s work with abused and at-risk youth. Other topics will include community support for victims and the role of law enforcement in and the prosecution and investigation of domestic violence and child abuse.

The Partnership for Safe Families and Communities of Ventura County and CLU’s Criminal Justice and Legal Studies Department, Center for Equality and Justice, and Community Counseling & Parent-Child Study Center are sponsoring the workshop. CLU launched an Intimate Partner Violence Prevention Program in September.

Lundring Events Center is in the Gilbert Sports and Fitness Center, which is north of Olsen Road near Mountclef Boulevard.

The $40 registration fee includes continental breakfast, lunch, materials and a certificate of completion. Qualifying participants will receive continuing education units.

The deadline to register is Friday, April 29. To register, go to http://www.callutheran.edu/vvworkshop. For more information, contact Robert Meadows at (805) 493-3484 or Schannae Lucas at (805) 493-3391.

 


 
"Your childs education and the State budget" Michelle Kolbeck

Tonight FUSD School Board will meet and is slated to vote on graduation requirements. That is how they have listed the item on their agenda that has the potential to cut programs, reduce class requirements for graduation and combine programs. FUSD is grappling with the same budget issues as other districts although I think that FUSD has one large hurdle that it still has to overcome, a general lack of accountability and transparency. Over the past year the School Board has heard from several parents bringing issues ranging from concerns over special services, to the lack of parent involvement. School Board members have attended school site council meetings regarding issues of accountability and lack of clarity. If the District wants the community to understand the situation, they need to work harder and better at creating a welcoming environment for community members to be involved (you need not have a child in the District to be a stakeholder or to get involved) and for demonstrating accountability when mistakes are made.

Here is an editorial in the Ventura county Star written by a Santa Paula Elementary School Board member, it is brief, and doesn't go into much detail, but at least it is a school board member working at communicating with the Board and attempting to communicate with the public and Kolbeck openly encourages the public to volunteer and donate to schools. Districts must reach out, and the public is going to need to see a shift at FUSD to a system that is more welcoming and ready to work with the community.

An excerpt:

"At a recent elementary school board meeting it became apparent that the "state of the state" has finally come to roost in Santa Paula.

Even though the Santa Paula Elementary School District board had pink-slipped a quarter of the teacher staff in March (approximately 50 out of 200), the public had yet to feel the effects of the state of the California budget. This is because nothing really changed as their child still went to the same school, had the same teacher, had the same classmates, etc.

However, during the time allotted for public comments, the SPESD board listened to students, parents, community members and staff about their concerns for programs that may no longer be available to them next year.

Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2011/apr/18/kolbeck-your-childs-education-and...
- vcstar.com

 
Fillmore Unified School District
Fillmore Unified School District

FILLMORE UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT REGULAR MEETING OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION
TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 2011 5:30 P.M. – CLOSED SESSION 6:30 P.M. - REGULAR MEETING 627 SESPE AVENUE, FILLMORE, CALIFORNIA

AGENDA
5:30 p.m.
A. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
B. ROLL CALL
C. PUBLIC COMMENT ON CLOSED SESSION AND NONAGENDA ITEMS, PETITIONS
This is the time and place to address the Board. State law prohibits the Board from acting on issues not included on the agenda; however, requests may be made for discussion of specific topics at subsequent meetings.
D. CLOSED SESSION
The Board of Education will meet from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. to consider matters appropriate for Closed Session in accordance with Government Code Sections 3549.1, 54956.7 through 54957.7 and Education Code Section 35146. If the Board does not complete Closed Session discussions at this time, the Board may adjourn to Closed Session at the end of the regular meeting. DISCLOSURE OF ITEM(S) TO BE DISCUSSED IN CLOSED SESSION School District Pupils (Education Code 35146)
o Expulsion Case Number 10-11-11
o Expulsion Case Number 10-11-12 Labor/Negotiations (Government Code 54957.6)
o Update; Direction to District Negotiators (Jeff Sweeney, Mike Bush, Todd Schieferle, Margaret Chidester) for negotiations with the Fillmore Unified Teachers Association (FUTA), the California School Employees Association (CSEA), Confidential Employees, and District Administration. Personnel Matters (Government Code 54957)
o Hiring, Evaluating, Discipline, Dismissal Public Employee Performance Evaluation: Superintendent (The Board and
Superintendent meet periodically to provide feedback to one another concerning
the achievement of goals.)
In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Superintendent's Office at (805) 524-6038. Notification 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the district to make reasonable arrangements to ensure accessibility to this meeting. [In accordance with Government Code 54961 and Board Bylaw 9320(a).]

6:30 p.m.
E. RECONVENE TO OPEN SESSION Any Action From Closed Session School District Pupils (Education Code 35146)
o Expulsion Case Number 10-11-11
o Expulsion Case Number 10-11-12
F. CALL TO ORDER AND PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG
G. CLARIFICATION OF AGENDA AND TIME ALLOCATIONS FOR DISCUSSION ITEMS
H. PUBLIC COMMENT ON AGENDA ITEMS AND NONAGENDA ITEMS, PETITIONS
This is the time and place to address the school board. State law prohibits the Board from acting on issues not included on the agenda; however, requests may be made for discussion of specific topics at subsequent meetings.
6:45 p.m.
I. STANDING REPORTS 10 minutes Student Representative’s Report 10 minutes Board Members’ Reports 10 minutes Superintendent’s Report
7:15 p.m.
J. ACTION CONTINUED »

 

Camarillo, CA. - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will host the Third Annual Conference on Social Justice in Education, Saturday, April 30, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in CI’s John Spoor Broome Library. The event is free and lunch is provided.

The theme of the 2011 Conference is, “Making Choices: Crushed, Compliant or Creative?” It will showcase and discuss issues of social justice at work in the community, area schools, and institutions of higher education. Teachers, students, parents, administrators, counselors, youth advocates, activists and paraprofessionals are welcome, as are others connected to public school education in some way that have concerns about equity, access and accountability.

The conference will open with remarks from CI’s President Richard R. Rush, followed by Senior Associate Dean and Director of the School of Education, Dr. Gary Kinsey. Maricruz Hernandez and Oscar Hernandez, principals in the Oxnard High School District, will give the keynote presentation.

A lunch panel featuring Trudy Arriaga (Superintendent, Ventura Unified School District (VUSD), Arcenio Lopez (Mixteco/Indigena Community Organizing Project), Anna Izaguirre (First Steps Infant/Toddler program for Teen Parents, VUSD), Danna Lomax (teacher, VUSD) and Edlyn Pena (professor, CLU), will be followed by afternoon sessions with presentations by local leaders in social justice issues. Attendees will have opportunities to network and share ideas throughout the day.

The program is sponsored by CI’s School of Education, California Institute for Social Business, Martin V. Smith School of Business & Economics, and the Center for Community Engagement. CLU’s Counseling and Guidance Department, Center for Equality and Justice, and Diversity and Education Excellence are also sponsors. Additional sponsors include Ventura County Community Foundation Social Justice Fund, Ventura Unified School District, McCune Foundation, Corwin Press, Sage Press, and Ventura County School Counselors Association.

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is strongly encouraged and available at http://education.csuci.edu/justice-conference/registration.htm. Free parking will be available in designated lots only; once on campus follow the directional parking signs. The full schedule of events can be seen on the same web page in early April. For information about the conference contact Merissa Stith, Events Coordinator at 805-437-8548 or mesissa.stith@csuci.edu.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 
California State University Channel Islands
California State University Channel Islands

Camarillo, CA. - CSU Channel Islands (CI) will host a campus-community Free Electronics Recycling Day at the Sage Hall Parking Lot A2 on Saturday, April 23, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The CSU campuses are partnering with E-Waste, All Green Electronics Recycling, a premier E-Waste recycling company, to celebrate Earth Day by collecting community E-waste during the month of April. CI’s recycling day is free and open to anyone interested in disposing of E-waste in a safe and secure environment. There will be a convenient drive-thru drop off service as well as walk-up donations.

What is E-waste? It is anything with a plug and circuit board and includes items like an outdated laptop, a VCR, monitors, printers, TVs, stereos and other electronic equipment. It is NOT furniture, household hazardous waste or kitchen appliances. E-waste contains heavy metals like lead, mercury, chromium, cadmium, and zinc, which contaminate the soil and water. Improper disposal of E-waste accounts for 70 percent of all heavy metals found in landfills today. A recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency states that the E-waste in landfills will quadruple over the next five years.

Judy Botelho, Director of the Center for Community Engagement at the CSU Office of the Chancellor, said, “It is our hope that the E-waste events taking place on CSU campuses throughout southern and central California will not only provide a service to our local community, but that it will also encourage people to learn more about the ways they can be environmentally responsible on a local and global level.

The event is sponsored by CI’s Center for Community Engagement and partial proceeds from the event will benefit the center.

For information regarding recycling visit www.allgreenrecycling.com and for information on the Free Electronics Recycling Day at CSU Channel Islands contact Pilar Pacheco, Associate Director of the Center for Community Engagement at CSU Channel Islands at 805-437-8851 or pilar.pacheco@csuci.edu.

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 
Brittany Gonzalez, a Senior at FHS, stands along side her amazing display of art work at the FHS Art Show held Tuesday, April 12, 2011.
Brittany Gonzalez, a Senior at FHS, stands along side her amazing display of art work at the FHS Art Show held Tuesday, April 12, 2011.
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Francisco Ortiz, a Junior at FHS, is very proud of his awesome art work on display at the Art Show.
Francisco Ortiz, a Junior at FHS, is very proud of his awesome art work on display at the Art Show.
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The delightful greeters for the FHS Art Show. (l-r) Diana J. Gumber, Senior at FHS, also the artist who drew the picture for the postcard and brochure and Briana Vazquez, a senior at FHS.
The delightful greeters for the FHS Art Show. (l-r) Diana J. Gumber, Senior at FHS, also the artist who drew the picture for the postcard and brochure and Briana Vazquez, a senior at FHS.
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A display of colorful carnival masks.
A display of colorful carnival masks.
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Sara Hansen and Jane David take a moment to view the pictures on display from photo class.
Sara Hansen and Jane David take a moment to view the pictures on display from photo class.
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The Fillmore High School Jazz Band performed for the public during the Art Show.
The Fillmore High School Jazz Band performed for the public during the Art Show.
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Amber Wilmot stops by to take a look at a few pencil drawings.
Amber Wilmot stops by to take a look at a few pencil drawings.
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Angel Rivas is a first grade student at San Cayetano in Mrs. Ferguson’s classroom. He won the award for perfect attendance for March. Congratulations Angel.
Angel Rivas is a first grade student at San Cayetano in Mrs. Ferguson’s classroom. He won the award for perfect attendance for March. Congratulations Angel.
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Professor now teaching counseling psychology at CLU
Jamie E. Banker
Jamie E. Banker

THOUSAND OAKS, CA. - A California Lutheran University professor who helped students and staff after the Virginia Tech massacre on April 16, 2007, will make a presentation on campus violence in commemoration of the anniversary of the tragedy.

Jamie E. Banker will discuss “Campus Violence: Remembrance, Awareness & Response” at 10 a.m. Monday, April 18, in Samuelson Chapel on the Thousand Oaks campus. She will emphasize prevention.

The free event is presented in remembrance of all victims of school shootings, many of which occurred in April.

Banker was a doctoral student and undergraduate instructor at Virginia Tech and a family therapist at the university’s Family Therapy Center at the time of the tragedy. She was on campus on the day of the shootings and assisted students and staff as well as the community in their recovery from the traumatic event.

The incident sparked Banker’s interest in campus violence and school shootings. Since then, she has made presentations at national conferences and published an article on the tragedy. She has also spoken about campus and community violence at medical conferences and residencies and trained potential first responders to this type of crisis.

Banker, a licensed marriage and family therapist, joined the CLU faculty in August. She is currently the director of CLU’s Master of Science in Counseling Psychology Program.

The chapel is located south of Olsen Road near Campus Drive.

For more information, contact Banker at (805) 493-3772 or jbanker@callutheran.edu.

 
California State University Channel Islands
California State University Channel Islands

Camarillo, CA. - CSU Channel Islands is announcing budget cuts in the form of eliminated positions and reduced staff appointments in addition to ongoing operating budget cuts, in the face of $3.8 million in budget reductions for the CI 2011-12 academic year. This cut is part of the $500M reduction in state support to the California State University system, an 18 percent decrease.

“All decisions to reduce the budget are made to minimize the impact to students and instructional programs at CI,” stated President Richard R. Rush. “Covering our campus’ $3.8 million cut is not viable without substantial structural changes in the way we operate. It is heartbreaking to lose people we respect that are part of the CI family.”

Eliminated positions included the Vice President for Advancement responsible for oversight of the areas of donor, alumni, and community relations, as well as communication and marketing; the Athletics Director charged with the development of Intercollegiate Athletics; and the Faculty Development Director responsible for faculty training and support for academic programs.

State limits on expected enrollment growth reduced the Athletic and Recreation Fees students paid toward the development of Intercollegiate Athletics. The campus will continue to build recreation and club sports to transition into an Intercollegiate Athletics program at some point in the future.

Actions to reduce staff appointments included the elimination of 12-month laboratory technician positions. It is anticipated that the positions will be available as 11-month positions. However, CI’s current hiring freeze will remain in place for other vacant positions, as well.

CI does not expect to make further reductions at this time. However, the University does not rule out additional cuts in the future. Governor Jerry Brown has reported that if the sales, vehicle and income taxes are not extended it is likely that the CSU can expect an additional $500M reduction to its budget.

“The people of Ventura County, who fought to build this four-year, public university, know that higher education is the economic engine of the region,” said Rush. “We should not be gutting public higher education; we should be growing it.”

About California State University Channel Islands
CSU Channel Islands (CI) is the only four-year, public university in Ventura County and is known for its interdisciplinary, multicultural and international perspectives, and its emphasis on experiential and service learning. CI’s strong academic programs focus on business, sciences, liberal studies, teaching credentials, and innovative master’s degrees. Students benefit from individual attention, up-to-date technology, and classroom instruction augmented by outstanding faculty research.

 

It’s that time of year again…. Fillmore High School Hall of Fame is seeking nominations for our 2011 Inductees. Anyone that would like to submit a name to be nominated please contact Joe Woods at #805-794-7439 or you can mail your nomination to: FHS, Sports Hall of Fame, P.O. Box 697, Fillmore, CA 93016 or contact any of the following committee members, Dick Mosbarger, Class of 1947, John Scoles, Class of 1959, Mike Marostica, Class of 1965, Debbie Basolo-Curnett, Class of 1969, Joe Woods, Class of 1979, Lynn Hasty-Cole, Class of 1985 or Jamie Arundell-Latshaw, Class of 1993. All nominations must be received by no later than June 1, 2011.

 
 
Free public presentations and performances

THOUSAND OAKS, CA. - The Fifth Annual Festival of Scholars at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks will showcase the work of students and faculty from Tuesday, April 26, through Monday, May 2.

Scholarly work by undergraduate and graduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Education and School of Business will be featured in more than 40 free interactive presentations and performances open to the public.

More than 300 faculty-mentored student projects are featured. Topics range from the accuracy of eyewitness testimony, to the effect ginger intake has on exercise recovery time, to the impact of studying abroad on students’ cultural sensitivity and emotional intelligence. One student will share her research on Facebook, which showed that people were less influenced by what people wrote about themselves than what others posted on their walls.

Several students will discuss what they found in recently declassified Central Intelligence Agency documents on the Reagan administration’s role in the Cold War. Collaborating with CIA historians, the students analyzed the correlation between data in CIA reports and the words and actions of President Ronald Reagan and his staff in the 1980s.

School of Education students will review the results of their efforts to develop empathy in students through 16 different service-learning projects at schools throughout Ventura, Los Angeles and Orange counties. Several School of Business students will present the marketing plans they developed to help businesses, ranging from custom painters looking to expand to a Lutheran camp organization facing declining participation. Graduate psychology students will present the latest research on sports concussions, Alzheimer’s disease and autism.

Students in the High Definition Digital Cinema class will screen shorts they filmed and multimedia majors will share stories and characters they created. KUSC radio host Alan Chapman, a composer/lyricist and well-known pre-concert lecturer, will comment on formal papers presented by music students. Recitals, an art and music walk, and a nature tour of the CLU campus are also slated.

Faculty will share their sabbatical projects and alumna Mary Neal Vieten will discuss her work developing a new model for treating military personnel and first responders suffering from stress-related psychological injuries.

CLU’s Office for Undergraduate Research is presenting the festival.

For a complete list of events and projects, go to http://www.callutheran.edu/fos. For more information, contact the Office for Undergraduate Research at or (805) 493-3795.

 
"Rethinking Popular Culture and Media" A Rethinking Schools Publication

First, the Fillmore High School art show is on Tuesday, April 12 6:30-8:30pm at the Veterans Memorial Building. The show is titled "Drawn into the Arts". Who are you going to bring?

Second, I've come across this interesting looking book "Rethinking Popular Culture and Media" Edited by Elizabeth Marshall and Oslem Sensoy. Just reading the summary is thought provoking.

Summary

Rethinking Popular Culture and Media is a provocative collection of articles that begins with the idea that the “popular” in classrooms and in the everyday lives of teachers and students is fundamentally political.

This anthology includes outstanding articles by elementary and secondary public school teachers, scholars, and activists who examine how and what popular toys, books, films, music, and other media “teach.” These thoughtful essays offer strong conceptual critiques and practical pedagogical strategies for educators at every level to engage with the popular.

Rethinking Popular Culture and Media features over 45 articles, divided into 6 sections:

1. Study the Relationship Between Corporations and Schooling
2. Critique How Popular Culture and Media Frame the Parameters of Historical Events and Actors
3. Examine the Connections Between Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality and Social Histories in Popular Culture and Media
4. View and Analyze Representations of Teachers, Students and Schools
5. Take Action for a Just Society
6. Use Popular Culture and Media to Transgress.

Writers include Wayne Au, Bill Bigelow, Linda Christensen, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ellen Goodman, Herb Kohl, Gregory Michie, Bob Peterson, and Renée Watson.

Praise for the book:

“Rethinking Popular Culture and Media is essential reading for all educators. Its gripping essays are written by teachers courageously helping students of all ages grapple with our media-saturated, commercially driven society. Their passion and experiences provide fodder, hope, and roadmaps for anyone committed to using the classroom to help children think critically and live creatively.”

—Susan Linn, Harvard Medical School, Co-founder and Director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, author of Consuming Kids: the Hostile Takeover of Childhood (New Press).

“This superb collection is based on the editors' belief that popular culture is a place where young people’s identities are both expressed and shaped by forces beyond their control. The starting point of any defense and reaction to this environment is critical reflection. The essays collected here will provide teachers and educators with an invaluable resource to think creatively about their own pedagogical activities in the classroom. Should be required reading for anyone dealing with issues of young people, media and popular culture.”

—Sut Jhally, Professor of Communication, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Founder and Executive Director, Media Education Foundation

Here is a link to more information: http://rethinkingschools.org/ProdDetails.asp?ID=9780942961485

****
And I just had to share this great NYTimes Article about Construction class for kids.

Here is an excerpt:
"After reviewing the plans with the workers, Ms. Winsor, 50, supervised them as they laid out two-by-fours for the front and back walls and then hammered the studs and plates together with three-inch nails. Next, she watched as some of them raised the walls and sheathed them in plywood while others used an electric jigsaw to cut bases for the portico columns. Finally, one of the carpenters used a screw gun to attach a flagpole to the roof and secure the pediment to the freshly painted facade.

At quitting time, the workers removed their protective headphones, put their tools back in their holsters and cleaned up their work stations. Then they gathered up the wooden toys they had made during break and ran to the door to greet their parents.

“Good job today,” Ms. Winsor hollered cheerfully at Oscar Markowitz, a 5-year-old boy with orange hair, flushed cheeks and a big grin, one of a dozen children (including the reporter’s son) participating in a weeklong camp she was holding at Construction Kids, her workshop on Flatbush Avenue. "

Here is a link to the full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/31/garden/31kids.html?_r=1

 
Ruth Ricards, Director of Child Nutrition Services for Fillmore Unified School District, came to
speak to the Character Counts students at San Cayetano Elementary.
Ruth Ricards, Director of Child Nutrition Services for Fillmore Unified School District, came to speak to the Character Counts students at San Cayetano Elementary.
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On Monday, April 4, 2011, San Cayetano School recognized good citizenship and character at their Peacebuilder Assembly for the month of April. Ms. Ruth Ricards, Director of Child Nutrition Services for Fillmore Unified School District, came to speak to the students. Ms. Ricards spoke to the students about how being a good citizen and friend, not only at school, but at home would also help them to make a better life for themselves. She also spoke to the students about the importance of a healthy breakfast and nutrition during our schools STAR testing during April 26 to May 6 will help them do their best on the test! ASB President, Cali Wyand,and Vice President, Lizzie Castaneda assisted Ms.Ricards in handing out the Peacebuilder certificates. The Peacebuilders for April are: Oscar Arriola, Marlene Hernandez, Ashley Vieyra, Angelica Herrera, Donovan Estrada, Anthony Ownbey Seward, Camila Rivas, Matthew Munoz, Rey Laureano, Julieanna Linares, Enrique Felix, Eva Vieyra, David Rodriguiz, Gustavo Granados, Diego Magana, Robert Gonzalez, Arturo Garcia, Jorge Hernandez, and Karina Cisneros . At the upper grade assembly, Cali then announced to the students that John Paul Pet is sponsoring the San Cayetano Character Counts Award of a $100.00 savings bond. Sissy Valenica was chosen by the fifth grade teachers as a model of outstanding behavior, responsibility, and kindness to the other students. She was recognized with a certificate and the savings bond. To conclude the assemblies, Lizzie reminded the students to turn in their Perfect Attendance tickets. Each month all students who come to school, each day, on time, are given an orange raffle ticket. The students place their tickets in a box and one ticket is drawn. The student whose ticket is drawn is given a backpack full of supplies. Each month, the tickets will be put into a larger box that will be kept until the end of the year. In June, Mrs. Marholin, the principal, will draw from the tickets to give away two new bicycles. Angel Rivas, from, Mrs. Ferguson’s class, won the Perfect Attendance Award for April.

 
FUSD Preparing for State Tests

I don't always have space or time to get every item in the articles that are published in the paper, so here are a few items that are of interest that were brought up.

According to FUSD Educational Services Director Katy Hadley FUSD is preparing for the "testing window" which starts next week. This is a block of days based on when the school year begins and ends, usually about 85% of the way into the school year. This is laid out by the State Department of Education. Here is information on the tests and dates: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sa/1011testdates.asp
Hadley indicated that they expect several schools to make "safe harbor" this year, but there is also a 67% proficiency benchmark that schools will feel pressure to reach.

This can be a stressful time for students and families (and school staff) as the schools are assessed based on the scores. Some things that families can do to support students in being well prepared for the tests:

1. Review the letter that will be sent home. It will list dates and information about testing at that school.
2. Talk to students about the importance of the tests, both for themselves and for their school. This is the time to show what they know.
3. Answer any questions students have about testing. For first time test takers, (second grade) it can be a bit scary and they don't want to mess up. Making sure they know what happens during the test can help them be calm and focused. Talk to your teacher and/or principal if you have questions.
4. Have student get to bed early the night before.
5. Wake up in time to have a good breakfast and to not feel rushed.
6. All tests should take place before lunch, so don't schedule any doctors appointments or make other appointments for student on testing mornings (or afternoons for that matter, so they can focus)
7. Encourage students to do their best but find a balance. We don't want students to get so stressed about doing well that they are nervous and distracted.
8. Make sure the child wears comfortable clothing on test day.
9. Keep the family schedule simple around testing time. Maybe less on the daily calendar on test days, so the student can relax before and after testing.

What does your family do to prepare for testing?
Remember (good or bad) part of the score is test taking skills, teachers will cover this in the days leading up to the tests, but students will encounter many different kinds of tests during their educational career (and life for that matter) remind them that one day they'll probably take a drivers test, maybe the SATs to get into college, or law or medical school entrance exams. Developing good test taking skills, and finding what works for them can be helpful. Things like breathing exercises can help to relax some students.

At the School Board meeting last night (April 5) the importance of the testing environment was brought up. John Garnica suggested that the District notify all staff of testing days to ensure that no leaf blowers are being used within earshot of classrooms during testing times (I would hope that it's normal district practice to not use leaf blowers during any classroom instruction... I wonder what the cost of gas for leaf blowers is for the district? Oh dear going off on a tangent again) Mr. Garnica also spoke about covering cheating and being clear with staff that everything is "on the up and up". He referred to a recent article in USA Today (below) regarding irregularities in Washington DC.
Here is a link to the complete article: http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2011-03-28-1Aschooltesting28_CV_N...

Here is an excerpt:
Standardized test scores improved dramatically. In 2006, only 10% of Noyes' students scored "proficient" or "advanced" in math on the standardized tests required by the federal No Child Left Behind law. Two years later, 58% achieved that level. The school showed similar gains in reading.

Because of the remarkable turnaround, the U.S. Department of Education named the school in northeast Washington a National Blue Ribbon School. Noyes was one of 264 public schools nationwide given that award in 2009.

Michelle Rhee, then chancellor of D.C. schools, took a special interest in Noyes. She touted the school, which now serves preschoolers through eighth-graders, as an example of how the sweeping changes she championed could transform even the lowest-performing Washington schools. Twice in three years, she rewarded Noyes' staff for boosting scores: In 2008 and again in 2010, each teacher won an $8,000 bonus, and the principal won $10,000.

A closer look at Noyes, however, raises questions about its test scores from 2006 to 2010. Its proficiency rates rose at a much faster rate than the average for D.C. schools. Then, in 2010, when scores dipped for most of the district's elementary schools, Noyes' proficiency rates fell further than average.

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