FILLMORE City Council
5/7 71.43%
Vote Count Percent
- 1. JAMEY BROOKS 1,048 - 14.50%
- 2. GAYLE WASHBURN 1,046 - 14.47%
- 3. OMERO MARTINEZ 993 - 13.74%
- M. CECILIA CUEVAS 969 13.41%
- STEVE CONAWAY 939 12.99%
- NORRIS ''RED DOG'' PENNINGTON 808 11.18%
- MARCOZ HERNANDEZ SR. 742 10.27%
- ROYCE DAVIS JR. 668 9.24%
WRITE-IN 15 0.21%
Total 7,228 100.00%

FILLMORE Unified SD - Gov Brd Mem.
25/27 92.59%
Vote Count Percent
- 1. JOHN GARNICA 1,831 - 30.93%
- 2. VIRGINIA A. DE LA PIEDRA 1,732 - 29.26%
- JOHN HOLLADAY 1,506 - 25.44%
- MARK A. AUSTIN 831 - 14.04%
WRITE-IN 20 - 0.34%
Total 5,920 100.00%

FILLMORE City Clerk
5/7 71.43%
Vote Count Percent
- 1. CLAY WESTLING 1,458 - 52.22%
- SHIRLEY J. SPITLER 1,313 47.03%
WRITE-IN 21 0.75%
Total 2,792 100.00%

FILLMORE City Treasurer
5/7 71.43%
Vote Count Percent
- 1. NORMA E. GUTIERREZ 1,232 - 43.56%
- ANGELICA RICHARDSON 843 29.81%
- GRACE M. DONAHUE 737 26.06%
WRITE-IN 16 0.57%
Total 2,828 100.00%

Measure H City of Fillmore North Specific Plan Ref
5/7 71.43%
Vote Count Percent
YES 1,530 -59.28%
NO 1,051 - 40.72%
Total 2,581 100.00%

Measure I City of Fillmore General Plan Amendment
5/7 71.43%
Vote Count Percent
YES 1,534 - 56.25%
NO 1,193 - 43.75%
Total 2,727 100.00%

Measure M Piru Cemetary Maint.
12/12 100.00%
Vote Count Percent
YES 299 - 86.67%
NO 46 13.33%
Total 345 100.00%

 


 

FILLMORE City Council
1/7 14.29%
Vote Count Percent
- OMERO MARTINEZ 194 - 8.33%
- GAYLE WASHBURN 401 - 17.21%
- MARCOZ HERNANDEZ SR. 189 - 8.11%
- ROYCE DAVIS JR. 239 - 10.26%
- STEVE CONAWAY 303 - 13.00%
- M. CECILIA CUEVAS 269 - 11.55%
- NORRIS ''RED DOG'' PENNINGTON 346 - 14.85%
- JAMEY BROOKS 386 - 16.57%
WRITE-IN 3 - 0.13%
Total 2,330 100.00%

FILLMORE Unified SD - Gov Brd Mem.
18/27 66.67%
Vote Count Percent
- JOHN HOLLADAY 436 - 25.97%
- MARK A. AUSTIN 262 - 15.60%
- VIRGINIA A. DE LA PIEDRA 478 - 28.47%
- JOHN GARNICA 500 - 29.78%
WRITE-IN 3 - 0.18%
Total 1,679 - 100.00%

FILLMORE City Clerk
1/7 14.29%
Vote Count Percent
- CLAY WESTLING 432 - 50.06%
- SHIRLEY J. SPITLER 430 - 49.83%
WRITE-IN 1 - 0.12%
Total 863 100.00%

FILLMORE City Treasurer
1/7 14.29%
Vote Count Percent
- ANGELICA RICHARDSON 285 - 33.22%
- GRACE M. DONAHUE 307 - 35.78%
- NORMA E. GUTIERREZ 264 - 30.77%
WRITE-IN 2 - 0.23%
Total 858 100.00%

Measure H City of Fillmore North Specific Plan Ref
1/7 14.29%
Vote Count Percent
YES 470 - 62.75%
NO 279 - 37.25%
Total 749 100.00%

Measure I City of Fillmore General Plan Amendment
1/7 14.29%
Vote Count Percent
YES 476 - 58.62%
NO 336 - 41.38%
Total 812 100.00%

 


 

Happy Election Day!

For up to the minute election results, please visit us online right here starting tonight at approximately 8pm.

P.S. Don't forget to vote! The Ventura County Recorders Office provides a very easy to use tool to locate exactly where to vote. It can be found at this link. Click here to find out where to vote

 


 
Major Bill Edmonds.
Major Bill Edmonds.

Major Bill Edmonds, a 1989 graduate of Fillmore High is currently taking a course of study at the Naval Post Graduate School in Monterrey. He will graduate in December with a Masters in Military Tactics and Strategy. His Masters thesis is on Profiling Terrorists. Major Edmonds is in Special Forces. He recently returned from a tour in Iraq where he served in Mosul.

Major Edmonds and his wife Cheryl will return to Washington for more intensive study at the
Pentagon. Edmonds graduated from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo of his graduation class. Edmonds has been a Army Ranger, and Airborne Army before his present assignment in Special Forces. He has had tours of duty in Kosovo, and Kuwait as well as assignments in the U.S. At Fillmore High Edmonds was involved in football, wrestling, and as a volunteer for the fire department and forest service.

 


 
At Tuesday night city council meeting Mayor Steve Conaway presented a proclamation to Pearl Lee Broughton, for her invaluable volunteer service to the Senior Center. Pictured (l-r) Annette Cardona, Pearl Lee Broughton, Mayor Steve Conaway, and Lori Nunez.
At Tuesday night city council meeting Mayor Steve Conaway presented a proclamation to Pearl Lee Broughton, for her invaluable volunteer service to the Senior Center. Pictured (l-r) Annette Cardona, Pearl Lee Broughton, Mayor Steve Conaway, and Lori Nunez.
Enlarge Photo

Fillmore City Council met October 28th at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall. The Council honored Pearl Lee Broughton and the employee of the quarter, heard a presentation on Chloride Control, and prioritized improvements to support downtown businesses.

The Council approved a draft of the City's housing element to be submitted on October 29, 2008. There will be a public workshop explaining the housing element and soliciting public comments on the draft on November 18th. The draft will be under review for 60 days after submission. Modifications are expected. The housing element draft is posted on the Fillmore City website (http://www.fillmoreca.com/) in the Planning Department section.
The United Water Conservation District (UW) and the Santa Clarita Sanitation District (SCSD) presented the Chloride Control Concept. Phil Friess, Head of SCSD Technical Services Department, and Dan Detmer, Senior Hydrogeologist at UW, spoke. Friess explained that the Upper Santa Clara River stakeholders had developed a plan to meet the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board's Chloride Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The Alternative Water Resources Management (AWRM) plan was based on TMDL special studies and includes requesting localized adjustments to the Water Quality Objectives.

Studies included an Agricultural Threshold Study, a Threatened and Endangered Species Study, an Anti-degradation Analysis, and a Groundwater Surface Water Interaction Model. The Ag study found that avocados were more sensitive to salt levels than strawberries and nursery crops. Avocados can be damaged if chloride levels reach over 117 milligrams/Liter. Studies showed that threatened and endangered species were less sensitive than avocados. Therefore, the SCSD is requesting Site Specific Objectives (SSO) for water quality in the Upper Santa Clara River area between Piru Creek and the Saugus Water Reclamation Plant (WRP). The Water Quality Objectives call for a chloride limit of 100 mg/L. SCSD, with the support of UW, will request a limit of 150 mg/L in the area between the Ventura/LA County line and the Valencia WRP, and will request a limit of 117-130 mg/L in the area (known as "Reach 4B") between the Ventura/LA County line and Piru Creek. 117 mg/L would be the usual limit and the 130 mg/L would only apply in times of drought, when the State water supply would have higher levels of chloride. Camulos Ranch is the only agricultural site within Reach 4B, and it would be provided with a separate water supply if the 117 mg/L limit was breached. CONTINUED »

 


 
Shown (l-r) are Captain Tim Hagel, Sheriff Bob Brooks, JDRF Official Captain Randy Pentis, Undersheriff Craig Husband, and Sergeant Joe Devorick.
Shown (l-r) are Captain Tim Hagel, Sheriff Bob Brooks, JDRF Official Captain Randy Pentis, Undersheriff Craig Husband, and Sergeant Joe Devorick.
Enlarge Photo

Sheriff Bob Brooks presented a check for $10,000 Thursday morning, Oct. 16th, for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation on behalf of Cops Running For Charity, which is a team of sheriff’s deputies who compete in physical endurance challenges throughout the world to raise money for a variety of medical charities. The presentation took place at the Sheriff’s Dept. Shooting Range in Camarillo.

The group recently ran a 35- mile ultra-marathon course across the volcanic landscape in Iceland. In 2007, the team ran a marathon on the steps of China’s Great Wall, and in 2006, they trudged across the dunes of the Sahara Desert in Tunisia in a grueling 70-mile race. Each race has been a physical and mental test for the team. Their focus in each race has been giving back to the communities they serve.

The group has raised thousands of dollars for medical charities, including Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the American Cancer Society, Lou Gehrig’s Disease (ALS), Hospice, and Alzheimer’s.

During Thursday’s event, Sheriff Brooks will also present a $2,500.00 check to ALS on behalf of Detective Sergeant Joe Devorick’s father, who was a sergeant with the Oxnard Police Department and died of ALS two years after his retirement.

The group recently presented a $5,000.00 check to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Members of CRFC will be available at Thursday’s event to answer questions about their unique adventures and to explain their motivation for helping the community.

Officer Preparing Release: Senior Deputy Eric Buschow.

 


 
Part 1
City of Fillmore
City of Fillmore

Southern California was a busy time in the late 1800’s. With the coming of the railroad, and regularly scheduled freight and passenger train service available from Los Angeles to Santa Paula in early 1887, real estate prices boomed and the pioneer spirit prevailed in little villages and settlements nestled in the sheep and cattle country of the magnificent wild mustard covered Santa Clara Valley. Advertisements in the Los Angeles Times, train excursions and barbecues all served to lure Angelinos and others to the developing area.

Our town’s formal beginnings go back to 1887 when visionary, Joseph D. McNab of the Sespe Land and Water Company convinced the Southern Pacific Railroad to establish a stop on the Fillmore site in lieu of the Cienega area site, east of the fish hatchery, Bardsdale, or the Sespe area, west of Sespe Creek. McNab was also instrumental in much of the infant town’s early activities and development, which included laying out the future city’s plans and hiring William Mullholland from Los Angeles to develop a wooden flume system, bringing essential water from upper Sespe Creek. Named in honor of Jerome A. Fillmore, a Southern Pacific General Superintendent, the town’s first street map was recorded in 1888 at the Ventura County Court House. By 1900, Fillmore boasted 150 citizens (Rand McNally Atlas). In 1958, a half century ago, the recorded population had grown to 4,725. Today, approximately 14,000 men, women and children call Fillmore home.

Growth, change and disaster have touched Fillmore through the decades. During Fillmore’s early days, businesses sprung up on either side of the railroad right-of-way near the depot on Main Street, the original main street. The first businesses, all wooden structures, included a rooming house, pool hall, general store, saloon, lumberyard, fruit stand, and barbershop, servicing the needs of rail passengers and residents alike. Dozens of other businesses including a newspaper, theatre, olive oil factory and an inn spread east down Main and along Fillmore Street. Fruit packinghouses, warehouses and corrals for cattle were located east of the depot. The railroad company owned a gravel pit, employing one hundred Chinese laborers loading cars of gravel. They lived in a tent village on the edge of town and traded with local merchants.

The Ventura Free Press applauded Fillmore’s acumen, serving the Santa Clara Valley in 1899 citing numerous service and goods businesses, two churches, grammar school, large public hall, Justice of the Peace, Constable and Deputy Sheriff, three notary publics, and an insurance and real estate agent. Other businesses included The Sespe Land and Water Co., Fillmore Irrigation Co., Sunset Telephone and Telegraph Co., Excelsior Laundry, on site representatives of Wells Fargo and Western Union Telegraph Co., and a stockyard with facilities to ship cattle. CONTINUED »

 

Whose Town Do They Want to Take Back? The Town that Gary Creagle and a few others envisioned in the 1980s? Gary and others wanted the City to grow all the way to Piru, build an airport and allow a gaming casino. Do we want Back the dysfunctional Town that nearly brought Fillmore to financial ruin? The voters threw out Gary and his cronies, and with a new city council under Mayor Delores Day, Roy Payne was hired as city manager and the city began to pick up the pieces. Now Gary wants it all back his way, and he's convinced a few newcomers to see things his way.

The frugality of the current City Council and city management is not an issue. Our city has lived within its means for many years now. The cost increases for management employees were largely beyond the city council's control; these were due to increases in medical insurance and the PERS retirement fund. It has been a difficult inflationary year for everyone, yet our city continues to operate on a BALANCED BUDGET. Since the recovery from the 1994 quake, the city has steadily built up RESERVES which amount to about 36% of the current operating budget.

With our financial house in order we can soon look forward to a new community swimming pool, new tennis courts and a new 22 acre park. These long-terms visions are coming to reality thanks to the support of the community and the leadership shown by the current city council. Fillmore needs more jobs and services. Santa Paula Hospital has been reopened and we have a new modern urgent care facility and Fillmore's budding business park and the needed jobs it will bring will soon be realized.

Above all, we are saddened by all the negative commentary about our community and our city. We need to start building bridges rather than creating walls of division. The discussion needs to focus on what is right for Fillmore, not who is right.

That is why we five retired Mayors of Fillmore are supporting Steve Conaway, Cecilia Cuevas and Norris Pennington for City Council. Vote November 4!

Sincerely,

Scott Lee, Mike Mc Mahan, Don Gunderson, Roger Campbell and Evaristo Barajas
5 Retired Mayors of the City of Fillmore

 
The home of Linda and Jerry Edmunds.
The home of Linda and Jerry Edmunds.
Enlarge Photo

Linda and Jerry Edmunds had a problem. They were country folks at heart, but they were city dwellers. Linda’s grandparents had a citrus ranch in Bardsdale and after they passed away, the Edmunds bought five acres from the family and decided to make the move to the country. First they built a barn for Jerry’s ranch management business and eventually they began to design a house. The idea of a modular home appealed to them and they ordered one which was delivered on three very long trucks. With extensive planning and vision, Jerry and Linda have transformed a modular home into a beautiful living and entertaining space.
Entering through large gates, a wide driveway leads to the home. The Edmunds have upgraded the interior with granite and tile and the spacious rooms are beautifully decorated. Several Kincaid paintings grace the living room and the family room/kitchen is large and welcoming with a stone fireplace. Three spacious bedrooms, an office, and a laundry area completes the home. In the backyard they have built a large entertainment area with a kitchen, massive stone barbecue and spit and plenty of seating space. It is a perfect gathering place for large groups of friends.
You will be delighted by this lovely home which is one of the four homes featured in the Fillmore Historical Museum Annual Fall Home Tour. The date is Sunday, Nov. 9th from 12:00 to 4:00. The Heritage Valley Fine Arts Sale will take place on the Museum grounds from 11:00 to 4:00 on the same day. Tickets are $20.00 advance sale and $25.00 the day of the tour. They may be purchased through the Museum (524-0948) or at Coffeeboy or Mirage in town, or at any home the day of the tour.

 
Michael Joe Hopper, 38, fled from Sheriff deputies Friday at approximately 10:29. He and an unnamed accomplice were stopped at Super ‘A’ Market when Hopper fled the scene. Deputies apprehended him several blocks away in the 300 block of Del Valle Drive following a foot pursuit. Hopper had to be Tasered when he resisted arrest. He was transported to the hospital for observation before being booked at the main jail. Hopper was charged with vehicle burglary, criminal conspiracy, possession of burglary tools, giving false information to police officers, resisting arrest, being under the influence of a controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Three charges were felonies, five for outstanding warrants, and others were misdemeanors. Reports indicate Hopper also used two aliases. Information on Hopper’s accomplice, who was also arrested at the Super ‘A’ Market parking lot, were not available at press time.
Michael Joe Hopper, 38, fled from Sheriff deputies Friday at approximately 10:29. He and an unnamed accomplice were stopped at Super ‘A’ Market when Hopper fled the scene. Deputies apprehended him several blocks away in the 300 block of Del Valle Drive following a foot pursuit. Hopper had to be Tasered when he resisted arrest. He was transported to the hospital for observation before being booked at the main jail. Hopper was charged with vehicle burglary, criminal conspiracy, possession of burglary tools, giving false information to police officers, resisting arrest, being under the influence of a controlled substance, and possession of drug paraphernalia. Three charges were felonies, five for outstanding warrants, and others were misdemeanors. Reports indicate Hopper also used two aliases. Information on Hopper’s accomplice, who was also arrested at the Super ‘A’ Market parking lot, were not available at press time.
Enlarge Photo