Above, Law enforcement turned out for Tuesday’s Police Storefront Christmas. Sheriff Geoff Dean is pictured far left, (r-l) Deputy Leo Vazquez, Community Resource Officer Max Pina, and Fillmore Sheriffs Capt. Monica McGrath, with Fillmore deputies and probation officer.
Above, Law enforcement turned out for Tuesday’s Police Storefront Christmas. Sheriff Geoff Dean is pictured far left, (r-l) Deputy Leo Vazquez, Community Resource Officer Max Pina, and Fillmore Sheriffs Capt. Monica McGrath, with Fillmore deputies and probation officer.
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The Fillmore Fire Department would like to thank the following clubs and organizations for their generous donations. Your support helped purchase food for the Fillmore Fire Department Toy Drive, which collected toys for the North Fillmore Sherriff Store Front and help provide 300 fresh chickens which were given away on Tuesday December 20th. Fillmore Volunteer Firefighter Foundation, Fillmore Lions Club, Fillmore Search and Rescue (SAR), Fillmore noontime Rotary, Fillmore Future Farmers of America (FFA), Sespe school cinnamon roll fundraiser. Fillmore Fire Department would also like to thank the wonderful citizens of Fillmore for their generous toy donations. We collected over 1200 new toys for our local needy families.
The Fillmore Fire Department would like to thank the following clubs and organizations for their generous donations. Your support helped purchase food for the Fillmore Fire Department Toy Drive, which collected toys for the North Fillmore Sherriff Store Front and help provide 300 fresh chickens which were given away on Tuesday December 20th. Fillmore Volunteer Firefighter Foundation, Fillmore Lions Club, Fillmore Search and Rescue (SAR), Fillmore noontime Rotary, Fillmore Future Farmers of America (FFA), Sespe school cinnamon roll fundraiser. Fillmore Fire Department would also like to thank the wonderful citizens of Fillmore for their generous toy donations. We collected over 1200 new toys for our local needy families.
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Henry "Hank" Data was born in 1916. As a young man leaving the U.S. Navy after World War II, Hank found there were no jobs to be. However Florine, hank's wife, had an uncle named Otto Jones who, with his brother, owned Jones brothers Pontiac in Fillmore and Hank was in the car business.

At 31 years of age, the youngest in his class, Hank took advantage of the G.I. benefits he had coming and was off to the General Motors Institute in Flint Michigan to begin his training as a parts and service manager. He returned to Jones brothers as a genuine GM parts manager, a position he was to hold until 1961 when the Jones brother kids became old enough to take his job. It was then that Wm. L. Morris II hired.

Hank at the Santa Paula location. Bill Jr was the boss but poppers would be there everyday and noticed Hank because of his turning off of un needed lights at the dealership. This got Hank on his good side.
In 1973 when offered a position at the Moorpark location, hank declined citing Grime’s Canyon twice a day as a main hurdle. So, he landed in Fillmore where he worked until his retirement in 1986 with a few returns to "break in a new guy" when called upon by Mr. Morris.

Hank was enlisted and valued greatly as an inventory specialist. Hank worked for over 4 decades in the parts business and 3 of those for Wm. L. Morris Chevrolet Oldsmobile. He is truly our "Employee of the Century".

 
Friday evening at approximately 7 p.m. an accident occurred at the intersection of Highway 23 and River Street. One vehicle attempted to make a left turn on to 23 and was struck on the driver’s side.
Friday evening at approximately 7 p.m. an accident occurred at the intersection of Highway 23 and River Street. One vehicle attempted to make a left turn on to 23 and was struck on the driver’s side.
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Both vehicles suffered substantial damage. No serious injuries were reported as of press time.
Both vehicles suffered substantial damage. No serious injuries were reported as of press time.
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SACRAMENTO, CA. – An adult male in his late 30’s is the first reported fatality linked to influenza for this influenza season, Dr. Ron Chapman, director of the California Department of Public Health and state public health officer, announced today.

“This death is a somber reminder that the flu can be a serious and even deadly disease,” Chapman said. “I encourage Californians to get their flu vaccine to help protect themselves and their families.”

The seasonal flu vaccine is recommended for everyone over 6 months of age and includes protection against the H1N1 strain. It is particularly important for people at high risk of complications, including pregnant women, people with chronic diseases such as diabetes, children and older adults to be vaccinated. Chapman urged Californians to get their flu shot today if they have not done so already. In addition, the nasal spray flu vaccine is available for healthy individuals ages two through 49 who are not pregnant.

Statewide surveillance shows that influenza activity remains low in California. Typically, influenza peaks between January and March. According to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu-associated deaths nationwide range from an estimated 3,000 to 49,000 annually.

“Since the flu season can last through May, it is not too late to get a flu vaccine,” Chapman said. “There is plenty of flu vaccine available.”

Get more information about flu and find a flu vaccine clinic near you. www.cdph.ca.gov

 
Santa puts a last minute touch on the Christmas tree.
Santa puts a last minute touch on the Christmas tree.
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Merry Christmas to all! The other day I made a phone call to Santa Claus. I’ve had his phone number since 1993. That was my son Joey's first Christmas. It came to me in the mail, and as a first time father I just figured it came with being a Dad. My Mother always seemed to have his number when I was a kid. She would say, "You better be good or I will call Santa. I’ll tell him not to come by this year." It worked on me and my two sisters. And it always worked for me as a father to all of my kids, Joey, Sarah, Jake, and Mahaila.

When I called Santa, he was working at the North Pole. He was nice enough as always when I called, to stop what he was doing and take the time to talk to me. So this is how it went.

Joe: Merry Christmas Santa. Thank you for taking my call.

Santa: {Laughing} I always have time for you Joe. Merry Christmas!

Joe: I am writing a story on you for the Gazette. Is that okay with you?

Santa: Okay. I need a break right now. I will be glad to talk with you.

Joe: Thank you so much. Well let’s get started. How long have you been bringing gifts to kids?

Santa: All my life that I can remember. I was lucky enough in the year 295 A.D. to have the money to give toys to all the kids in my area. Before you knew it I was doing it for everybody. I never had kids of my own, but I have always loved seeing the kids’ faces when they get a toy or gift from me. It makes me happy.

Joe: Where are you from, the North Pole?

Santa: No. I was born in Smyrna. It’s in Turkey, in the year 280 A.D. That is where I met Mrs. Claus. I was a toy maker. We both love toys and kids. One day in around the year of 350 A.D. we were asked by a Elf named Pa Pa if we wanted to move to the North Pole. He said he had a great work shop of toys, but needed my help to get them to the children around the world. The Mrs. and I talked about it, and we both thought it would be the right thing to do.

Joe: So what is Mrs. Claus's name, may I ask?

Santa: Sure you can. Her name is Annua. But I call her Mama.

Joe: You have called many things, what’s your name?

Santa: Well my name is Nicholas Kris Kringle Claus. Some time ago they made me a Saint of toys. So they called me Santa Claus. I have been known as Saint Nicholas. In Hungary and in Slovenia they call me Mikuals. In the Netherlands and Belgium they call me Sinterklaas. Charles Dickens called me Father Christmas. Some call me Saint Nick or Kris Kringle. All I ask is that you don't call me late for dinner! {Deep Laughter}

Joe: {Laughing} Yeah, I know. I love to eat too! So how many Elfves live at the North Pole, and do they work all year?

Santa: We have 1,278 Elve's here at the work shop. They love this place. It has been their home longer than mine. The way me and the Mrs. feel we are still their guest. We all work together for our big day. But we take a break every year after Christmas is over.

Joe: Santa, does everybody leave you milk and cookies?

Santa: I do love milk and cookies. The fine people in the U.S. and Canada leave me them. In Great Britain and Australia they leave me a little Sherry and Mince Pie. In Sweden and Norway it‘s Rice Porridge. In Ireland it’s Milk or Guinness and Christmas Pudding. Now you know why the call me plump! {Booming Laughter!}

Joe: What is your favorite story or movie about you?

Santa: I like most of all of them. Some are so silly. The people make up their stories, some are so far fetched I have to just laugh. But I guess I still love T’was the Night Before Christmas, the best. But let me tell everybody out there, I am not the reason for Christmas!

Joe: What do you mean about that?

Santa: So many people forget what Christmas is all about.

Joe: What is Christmas to you Santa?

Santa: That’s easy! Christmas is a time to always remember the birth of the Son Of God, Jesus. That is what it is all about. A time we all can come together with our family and friends, in peace and love in our hearts and souls. This is what I was taught since I was a little boy. It is not about what I got or what I did not get for Christmas, it is about the birth of Jesus Christ. They don’t call it Santamas. It is Christmas!

Joe: Wow. Some people do forget the real meaning don't they?

Santa: They sure do. But I know. And so should everybody else.

Joe: I agree with you. But you do make people happy and smile.

Santa: Thank you Joe. If I can do that, then that is my small part of the holidays.

Joe: The first Christmas I remember was in 1966, my whole family was at the house. That was a great one for me.

Santa: You were five years old. Your Mom made sure that all of your family was there that year. Joe, that was the year your Father was killed in that car crash in March. Your Mom needed everybody near her that year. The whole family came to Fillmore! What was missing with your Father gone was made up for all the love from the family in the house that day.

Joe: And you brought me a.....

Santa: A bike! Your first "Big Boy" bike. It was green.

Joe: It sure was.

Santa: I think you needed to know that at that time, you were a "Big Boy".

Joe: Thank you Santa. I will never forget that Christmas.

Santa: No Joe. Thank you. I love to make kids happy. It is so great to be able to give.

Joe: One last question if I could please. What makes the Reindeer fly and how do you do it all in one night?

Santa: Well we have special Reindeer hay we give them on Christmas Eve. They fly as fast as the speed of light. We start in Asia and work our way with a lot of help from my Elves around the world with time. Last stop is the Hawaiian Islands, then home.

Joe: And your Reindeer's name?

Santa: Well you know! Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, and Blitzen. And of course Rudolph with his nose so bright. I love them all so much. {Deep Ho Ho Ho's}

Joe: Well with that, I know I have taken too much of your time. Merry Christmas Santa. And thank you so much for everything over the years.

Santa: {Laughing} Joe it is always nice to talk with you. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
So in closing this story out, my Mom would say, " Yes, Denise, Donneta, Joe, Shane, Jeremy, Alyssa, Robbie, Joey, J.D., Sarah, Jake, Mahaila, Haley, Landon, Little Sarah, and Glen...and you too Virginia, whereever you may be. Yes, there is a Santa Claus!

 

Over 100 residents have signed a petition lodging a complaint to the City of Fillmore regarding a childcare facility being proposed in a residential area of town. The property in question has had numerous complaints by area residents for neglect of maintenance and upkeep along with many loud gatherings which have had a negative impact of its neighbors.

Early this year the property owner approached the City with an application for a modular structure to be placed on the property for the proposed daycare business. The neighborhood residents are extremely upset with the proposed project. They have sited the presence of a Megan’s Law registered sex offender living in close proximity and concern the proposed structure will have a negative impact on the tranquility of their neighborhood and home values.

This was put in motion about three years ago when Alma Ferrel noticed Fillmore did not have a childcare facility which was not income or religious based. Ferrel, wanting to expand her existing daycare business, searched for a location in town that would meet the State requirements for expanding. She found the three lots owned by Vincent Castillo located on River Street and Dunton Lane. One lot has an existing building (vacant church), one is paved for parking and the corner lot is undeveloped.

In February 2011 Castillo submitted an incomplete application to the City on a proposed building for Ferrel’s new daycare center. The application was rejected and Castillo was asked to return a properly completed application. There was a great deal of back and forth between Castillo and the City, with the City asking for the proper paperwork.

One of the requirements that concerned Ferrel and Castillo was the Development Impact Fees (DIF) required by all projects that connect to the city sewer system. According to City Manager Yvonne Quiring, original fees were approximately $100,000. Ferrel said she paid $63,000, the cost reduced by merging two lots and recalculating the square footage. Feeling they were not getting anywhere with the City and wanting a way to lower the DIF, Ferrel called County Superintendent Kathy Long, who advised Ferrel to approach Councilmember Patti Walker for advice on the situation. In Arpil 2011 Walker set up a meeting with Quiring, Ferrel, Castillo, Community Development Director Kevin McSweeney and herself.

During the meeting the subject of how to avoid paying or possibly lowering the cost of the DIF was discussed. Castillo informed those in attendance that he would obtain a “temporary” building with a holding sewage tank that could be pumped out once a month and questioned if such a building could be placed on the property, thus avoiding connecting to the sewers and avoiding the DIF. Those present agreed to look into using the holding tank, possibly alleviating the need to pay the impact fees. Castillo’s original proposal asked for approval of a daycare facility, classes, religious activities and services available both day and evenings, all activities that had cause problems for the neighbors in the past.

There was also a question on how long a temporary use permit could be issued. Two years is common, but Ferrel had concerns that two years would not give enough lease time for the business to qualify for the funding from the State agency First Five so she asked for an agreement of five years. McSweeney told those attending the meeting he would look into all of the City’s requirements for the project to move forward.

A public meeting was held on the issue where 15 of the over 100 residents who signed the petition against the project came to voice their objections, but for the residents to continue fighting the project the City required a $700 appeal fee be paid by the residents. They do not what a temporary modular building placed in their neighborhood.

The residents have had several run-ins with the property owner over loud noise and parking issues due to the church being rented out as a hall for various functions; use that the property is not zoned for, and the property’s landscape has not been maintained with weeds surrounding all three lots. Sheriffs Captain Monica McGrath confirmed to the Gazette that there is a Megan’s Law registered sex offender living in close proximity and that person in question was convicted of a misdemeanor in 1996, but has complied with all necessary State requirements to date.

After researching and finding that the proposed holding tanks would not meet the City’s requirements, McSweeney told the interested parties that they could not use the holding tanks; the project would have to connect to the City sewer system, pay the DIF and a fire sprinkler system needs to be installed. Also, only the daycare facility would be approved and no other activities.

The protesting residents were not assisted by any Council Members, City Manager or County Supervisor on how they could avoid their appeal costs. Consequently the residents could not come up with the appeal fee to fight the project and it was approved.

The proposed childcare facility will not be administered by First Five and will not be based on an income sliding scale or be a State entitlement program. However, Ferrel said she will be obtaining a loan from First Five towards the project. It will be privately owned business available to children 6 weeks to 12 years with a flat tuition rate and offer a summer program. The new business has not yet received its State license and the question of the location of the registered sex offender may be an issue.

 
O’ Holy Night Nativity
O’ Holy Night Nativity
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A Barn, Some Wings, and a Wise Man in a Feather Boa: The 2011 Community Nativity Play

Written By F. Ferguson, Staff Writer

On the Way to Bethlehem
Sometimes I marvel at how much faith the Magi had in their GPS system, a “star in the east.” Somewhere in North Fillmore I’m trying to find a way for a car to hop over the river in pitch darkness while cursing the confounding glowing navigation screen for rotating and throwing my feeble spatial sense into a tailspin. I wonder if the Magi ever had to backtrack. Like I do.

A propitious trail of taillights serves as my Star of Bethlehem, leading me to “the barn at the Stehly ranch.”

The Stehly Ranch
Down the one-lane road through a grove of orange trees, Sam Alviz and Thomas Rabb wielding flashlights and Edgar Alviz on a four-wheeler corral cars into the makeshift parking lot. Sam gives me directions to the barn. “Just go up the road—you’ll see it,” he assures me. I set out on foot into the darkness.

Finally, the warm lights of the house start shining through the trees. So far, there are about 20 adults and a few kids gathered in the paved clearing. The shed is lit up inside with Christmas lights strewn across the hay and topped with a lit tinsel-lined star. Bundles of hay as well as benches and chairs circle the front of the barn: the scene is set.

Exploring the Grounds
Bearing a box of sweets, I make my way towards the house, following the glowing trail of luminaria on the ground. Inside, it’s warm and cozy—the scent of hot apple cider fills the air as guests visit in the den and others setting up their crock-pots in the dining room. A poncho-sporting Marie Alviz directs me to the dessert table before cheerfully returning to labeling the guests’ dishes.

The flyer had said that rehearsal for all those interested would be a whole 15 minutes before the performance, so there’s time to check out the wings of the stage. On the patio a small horde of actors rehearse… their costumes. A lady helps dress the final magus in what looks like heavy woven drapes while another Wise Man, wearing a black feather boa among his other accoutrements, looks on approvingly. Fifteen young shepherds in robes of fabric scraps watch over, and scamper with, a tail-wagging beagle, while four colorful angels flit about. A girl in a partial butterfly costume considerately asks a younger angel wearing a pink princess dress, “Do you want different wings?”

The Performance
I wander out to the shed to secure a good spot beneath the giant sycamore tree. The faint strains of a carol drift over from the direction of the house as the procession of actors slowly approach and the audience joins in singing Silent Night. Off to the side, Regina Nuñez holds a flashlight for Former Mayor Scott Lee to read the narrative centered on the Gospels according to Luke and Matthew. Rebecca and Miguel Enriquez as Mary and Joseph enter the barn, placing Baby Jesus (their infant Marco) in the manger. Waves of actors gather around the Holy Family: the shepherds, the angels, and finally the magi. Hark! The Herald Angels Sing weaves into the narration, and O Come All Ye Faithful crowns it. One of the shepherds holds up what might be a heavy-duty halogen lamp to help illuminate the scene. Photos of the living tableau are taken at the picturesque finale. Regina leads a final prayer with a reminder of the anticipatory meaning of Advent before calling out, “Let’s go in and eat!”

Feasting
The whole crowd, now over a hundred strong, migrates towards the abundant baskets of bread and half-dozen crock-pots surrounding an Advent wreath. Hot apple cider is ladled out and the rooms begin to fill with people balancing bowls of soups and plates piled with dessert. Mrs. Mary Stehly stands near the entry, welcoming people inside. She chats with the guests; amazingly, she recalls our passing conversation from more than a year ago. At her urging, I join the crock-pot conga line and pick up what I learn is focaccia, a savory square of yeast, olive oil, and rosemary. At the five tables set up in the living room, people of all ages enjoy each other’s company, catching up with old friends and making new ones. At the table near a glass case containing statues of Our Lady of Guadalupe, I meet 90-year-old Miriam Harnage. Soon, Sam and Thomas come around to gallantly offer guests some much-appreciated apple cider.

When I get up to search for some fabled peppermint bark, I bump into Mr. Jim Stehly himself. His trademark twinkling eyes seem to light up even brighter, and he calls me by name as he grasps my hand. “How good to see you!” he cries with such joy that it makes me feel as though I’m the guest of honor. This warmth and heartfelt congeniality undoubtedly contributes to the reputation this tradition enjoys in these parts.

Tradition
Regina has run the Community Nativity Play since 1994, if not earlier. Each production has been unique, with differences ranging from location to stable construction to the number of cast members and live animals involved. Even when the event had to be canceled due to poor weather, the effort always has been a labor of love, bringing the community together. Marie recalls early versions of the affair with a stable built behind the Fillmore Library, and of the 25 people who’d attend, half would be her family. Having been reincarnated The event now has a large loyal following of families from church communities all over town that return year after year.

Legacy
Being surrounded by families and neighbors visiting over good food, sharing good times and making good memories around the fireplace, it feels exactly as the flyer promised: “All are welcome: Young and Old, Royal and Lowly.” The Stehlys have literally opened their home (and their barn) to the community, friends and strangers alike—and even to the Baby Jesus. What a shining example they provide of hospitality. Smiling faces abound tonight, setting the stage for a happy holiday season.

At the end of the night Miriam quips, “You know what I hate about going out? Going home!” I completely agree, especially when it’s time to leave such a cozy and welcoming place. Then again, the Magi, having met their Savior, went home rejoicing. Incidentally, just as they departed by another way,” this time around, there are no GPS glitches going home. I even have a hunk of peppermint bark for the journey.

Merry Christmas!

 
Saturday, December 10, the Gutierrez family of Fillmore honored their father and husband, Jose Gutierrez, when they decorated his floragraph (floral portrait), part of the Donate Life Rose Parade float. Above, the family decorating Jose’s floaragraph: Graciela Gutierrez (wife), Eduardo Gutierrez (son), Maritza Gutierrez (daughter), Jose Gutierrez (son - standing), and Norma Gutierrez (daughter).
Saturday, December 10, the Gutierrez family of Fillmore honored their father and husband, Jose Gutierrez, when they decorated his floragraph (floral portrait), part of the Donate Life Rose Parade float. Above, the family decorating Jose’s floaragraph: Graciela Gutierrez (wife), Eduardo Gutierrez (son), Maritza Gutierrez (daughter), Jose Gutierrez (son - standing), and Norma Gutierrez (daughter).
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Jose Gutierrez was a simple and humble man. He enjoyed reading and was an avid supporter of education. Jose loved the ocean and enjoyed the outdoors, treasuring morning walks whenever he visited new places. He had a positive attitude and optimistic view of life. "You can do it, dude" was his response when his children faced a challenge.

In May of 2006, his family made the collective decision to donate their father's organs after he suffered severe brain trauma. "We knew that organ donation was the right thing to do. Two years later our lives have been deeply enriched by the donation experience," said his children.

Jose's family connected with the recipient of his heart, who expressed his unconditional gratitude for extending his life. "We received the letter with delight knowing the recipient was recovering well. However, we yearned for our father and continued to mourn his absence. Just like the recipient's numerous drafts, it took us several attempts to respond to his heartfelt appreciation," said Jose's family.

The Gutierrez family attended their first National Kidney Foundation Transplant Games in Pittsburgh in the summer of 2010. The family describes how the experience helped them in their grief journey. "The Games provided a deeper opportunity to heal and reflect on his life, which continues to enhance the lives of the four recipients and their families. The Games culminated with a tremendous feeling of empowerment and resilience. Transplantation is by far the most technically advanced aspect of modern medicine, yet it's the wonder of human kindness that we marvel: the ability to think outside of ourselves during our deepest loss to save and extend the lives of others."

 

A teenager who fatally shot a gay classmate in the back of the head at an Oxnard middle school was sentenced Monday to 21 years in prison.

A Ventura County judge issued the sentence a month after Brandon McInerney agreed to plead guilty to second-degree murder and voluntary manslaughter in the death of classmate Larry King.

McInerney was shackled during the sentencing and handcuffed as he was led from the courtroom.

McInerney, who was 14 when he pulled a gun out of his backpack and shot King two times at point-blank range, will be kept behind bars until he is 39 under the terms of the deal struck by Ventura County prosecutors.

In an unusual... http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2011/12/teen-gets-21-years-in-pris...

 
A memorial has been started for Sergio Mendez in front of Starbuck in Fillmore.
A memorial has been started for Sergio Mendez in front of Starbuck in Fillmore.
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Mendez was killed by an SUV while sitting in the dining area.
Mendez was killed by an SUV while sitting in the dining area.
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(Foreground wearing shorts) Michael Cedarland looks at his SUV inside Fillmore Starbucks.
(Foreground wearing shorts) Michael Cedarland looks at his SUV inside Fillmore Starbucks.
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On 12-13-2011, at about 7:05 p.m., deputies from the Fillmore Police Department responded to 650 Ventura Street (Starbucks Coffee) to an injury traffic collision involving a vehicle driving into the building and injuring customers inside the business.

Approximately two minutes after dispatch, Fillmore Fire units arrived on scene at the location to find conditions as reported in addition to multiple injured victims. Upon further examination of the scene, it was determined a male subject in his thirties was trapped between the vehicle and interior wall of the structure.

When deputies and the Fillmore Fire Department arrived they found the vehicle, driven by Michael Cedarland, inside the business. The vehicle broke through the east wall of the business, traversed through the customer lobby area, and came to rest inside at the front door. The vehicle pinned one of the customers, Sergio Mendez 30, of Fillmore, against the front door frame, which required heavy rescue from the members of the Fire Department. Two other customers, Jose Iraheta 25, of Lancaster and Thomas Michaels 73, of Piru, were treated for minor injuries at the scene.

Mendez, Iraheta and Michaels were all transported to Ventura County Medical Center. Mendez sustained multiple internal injuries and, during emergency surgery, succumbed to the injuries. He was pronounced deceased by the surgery physician. Iraheta and Michaels were treated and released from the hospital.

At this time, drugs or alcohol do not appear to be a factor in the collision. Investigators are looking into the possibility Cedarland lost consciousness while driving. The cause of the collision is still under investigation. Courtesy of Fillmore Police Department and Fillmore Fire Department.

 
At approximately 7:07 p.m. on Tuesday December 13th, 12 Fillmore Fire units responded to a vehicle collision at Starbucks in Fillmore at the corner of A street and Highway 126. A Chevrolet Tahoe had crashed through the east wall of the business, near the drive thru, pinning several people against tables and walls. Eye witnesses said the vehicle was traveling about 50 miles per hour when it struck the building’s exterior wall. The driver identified himself as a Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department deputy. He stated he had fallen asleep and veered from the westbound lanes of Highway 126 (Old Telegraph Road) across the eastbound lanes, over the sidewalk, across the parking lot for approximately 100 yards, between two large palm trees before crashing through Starbucks east wall. The vehicle traveled completely through the front lounge coming to rest against the front door and corner. One unidentified man who was sitting in a large brown chair on the east wall of the building near the point of impact was pinned against the front door on the opposite side of the dining area. His injuries were reported to be critical. Two other patrons were seriously injured when they were pinned against the south wall of the dining area. All three persons were extracted by the Fillmore Fire Department and transported a local hospital, according to Fire Chief Rigo Landeros. We will have an update as more information becomes available.
At approximately 7:07 p.m. on Tuesday December 13th, 12 Fillmore Fire units responded to a vehicle collision at Starbucks in Fillmore at the corner of A street and Highway 126. A Chevrolet Tahoe had crashed through the east wall of the business, near the drive thru, pinning several people against tables and walls. Eye witnesses said the vehicle was traveling about 50 miles per hour when it struck the building’s exterior wall. The driver identified himself as a Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department deputy. He stated he had fallen asleep and veered from the westbound lanes of Highway 126 (Old Telegraph Road) across the eastbound lanes, over the sidewalk, across the parking lot for approximately 100 yards, between two large palm trees before crashing through Starbucks east wall. The vehicle traveled completely through the front lounge coming to rest against the front door and corner. One unidentified man who was sitting in a large brown chair on the east wall of the building near the point of impact was pinned against the front door on the opposite side of the dining area. His injuries were reported to be critical. Two other patrons were seriously injured when they were pinned against the south wall of the dining area. All three persons were extracted by the Fillmore Fire Department and transported a local hospital, according to Fire Chief Rigo Landeros. We will have an update as more information becomes available.
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City of Fillmore
City of Fillmore

The December 13, 2011 Fillmore City Council Meeting began with a salute to exiting Council Member Patti Walker and continued with a decision on how to replace the vacant seat along with a plea to reconsider opening to the public the Fillmore High School running track and adopt a resolution to annually review the Fillmore Business Park.

About 30 people came to honor Walker for her nine years of service to Fillmore; in attendance were Ventura County Supervisor Kathy Long, Mark Lawler and Sheriff’s Captains Randy Pentis, Tim Hagel, Bruce Macedo, Monica McGrath and Sgt. Dave Wareham among others.

Mayor Gayle Washburn presented Walker with a proclamation and spoke of Walker’s hard work on various committees and civic pride as a community leader. Lawler said he had known Walker for about five years and that she has done an incredible job of representing Fillmore, thanking her for her years of service adding, “There are very few people who can calm a room just by their presence.”
Long presented Walker with a proclamation signed by all five Ventura County Supervisors and stated “(Walker) always understood we have to work together….It’s been a pleasure to work with you.”

Walker told those CONTINUED »

 
At approximately 5:25p.m.Sunday, a collision occurred on Mountain View near Third Street. The driver, Timothy Chessani, 49 of Fillmore, travelling northbound on Mountain View in a Jeep Grand Cherokee, struck a 1988 Mercedes which was parked at the curb. Chessani’s car overturned.
At approximately 5:25p.m.Sunday, a collision occurred on Mountain View near Third Street. The driver, Timothy Chessani, 49 of Fillmore, travelling northbound on Mountain View in a Jeep Grand Cherokee, struck a 1988 Mercedes which was parked at the curb. Chessani’s car overturned.
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The Mercedes suffered moderate damage. No injuries were reported.
The Mercedes suffered moderate damage. No injuries were reported.
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Jan Marholin, new Boys and Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley CEO.
Jan Marholin, new Boys and Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley CEO.

The Boys and Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley is pleased to announce that their new CEO is Jan Marholin. Jan is currently an elementary Principal in Fillmore. She will be retiring from education in December and taking over the CEO position in early January 2012.

Jan brings with her the educational, management and organizational skills needed for this position. She has had experience being on other non-profit boards and understands the need for both community and business relationships. She has written many grants and has relationships with many foundations. Jan is very excited and looks forward to being part of the Boys and Girls Club of Santa Clara Valley.

When Jan isn’t working she loves traveling and finding restaurants that have been showcased on the Food Network. Jan loves sports and loves to be outside with her cocker spaniels.

 
Saturday, at approximately 2:15 p.m., a northbound car on Sespe Street, Bardsdale near South Mountain Road near the cemetery, failed to negotiate the 90-degree turn and overturned into a ditch.
Saturday, at approximately 2:15 p.m., a northbound car on Sespe Street, Bardsdale near South Mountain Road near the cemetery, failed to negotiate the 90-degree turn and overturned into a ditch.
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Neither the driver nor the passenger were reported to have sustained injuries. Cause of the accident was not reported.
Neither the driver nor the passenger were reported to have sustained injuries. Cause of the accident was not reported.
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Ventura County Sheriff's Department
Ventura County Sheriff's Department

On December 10, 2011, at approximately 3:00 a.m., Camarillo patrol deputies responded to the 300 block of Paseo Camarillo, in the city of Camarillo, to a call of a physical altercation involving a stolen vehicle. Upon arrival, deputies located an adult male victim suffering from a serious head wound. The initial investigation revealed the victim was involved in a fist-fight with a family member and another subject identified as local gang member Juan Dominguez. During the fight, Dominguez, who is on parole, used a beer bottle to strike the victim on top of the head, causing a deep lasceration. Immediately following the altercation, Dominguez and a female suspect identified as Christine Saenz took the victim’s vehicle without permission and fled the area.

Later that morning, investigators assigned to the Camarillo Special Enforcement Detail continued the investigation. A lengthy search of various locations throughout Fillmore, Santa Paula, and Ventura resulted in the eventual discovery of the victim’s stolen vehicle in the parking lot of Motel 6, located at 3075 Johnson Drive in the city of Ventura. Investigators conducted surveillance in the area and soon determined which motel room the suspects were staying in.

Christine Saenz eventually walked out of the room and attempted to leave in the stolen vehicle, however she was immediately detained and arrested for the unlawful taking of a vehicle. Investigators turned their attention to the room and located Juan Dominguez and a subject identified as Randy Martinez. Dominguez was arrested for committing an assualt with a deadly weapon - causing great bodily injury, unlawful taking of a vehicle, street terrorism, and violation of parole. Martinez was arrested for being under the influence of a controlled substance and being in possession of drug paraphernalia.

Meanwhile, investigators also encountered gang member Frank Gomez in the immediate area. During a subsequent search of Gomez, he was found to be in possession of a loaded handgun and methamphetamine. Gomez proceeded to physically resist during the arrest process until he was subdued and taken into custody with the assistance of a Ventura County Sheriff’s K9. Gomez was arrested for resisting arrest, carrying a loaded firearm, possession of a loaded firearm by a convicted felon, possession of ammunition by a convicted felon, possession of a controlled substance with a firearm, and street terrorism.

Juan Dominguez, Christine Saenz, Frank Gomez, and Randy Martinez were all booked at the Ventura County Pre-Trial Detention Facility for the listed charges.

Report Number: 11-28060 and 11-28081
Location: Motel 6 - 3075 Johnson Drive, Ventura, Ca.
Date & Time: December 10, 2011/ 12:15 P.M.
Unit Responsible: Camarillo Police Department - Special Enforcement Detail
(S)uspects, (V)ictims, (W)itnesses (D)ecedent City of Residence Age
S-1 Juan Amaro Dominguez, Fillmore, Ca., 26
S-2 Christine Marie Saenz, Ventura, Ca., 36
S-3 Frank Valdes Gomez, Oxnard, Ca., 34
S-4 Randy Andrew Martinez, Fillmore, Ca., 22
V-1 Charles Santizo, Carpenteria, Ca.
Deputy Preparing Media Release: Sergeant John J. Gleason
Media Release Date: December 12, 2011
Follow-Up Contact: Senior Deputy Matt Young (805) 388-5117
Approved by: Captain Ron Nelson

 
Noah Aguirre
Noah Aguirre

Most of the time hard work will always pay off in the game of life. And in the case of Noah Aguirre that is what has happened. Noah, a Fillmore High School Grad Class of 2009, is still working hard at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota. He is in his third year there and plays basketball for the Pipers of Hamlin University.

When I called Noah he was doing just what he always did in his days at Fillmore, he was shooting baskets in the gym. I asked him how it was going this year for him. "Great the team is off to a slow start at one win and two losses, but we have high hopes this year. We have a lot of talent."

One of the best nicknames a basketball player can have is a "Gym Rat”, a player who spends most of his or her free time in the gym, working on their skills. Noah is just that. Since he was a little kid he always seems to have a basketball in his hands. This hard work has given Noah a chance to see a huge part of not only America, but also the world.

After high school Noah played basketball in Greece for a summer. Last year he was asked to play for the U.S.A. team for the U.S.S.A.I. organization. They play basketball in Europe for smaller schools, and teams made up of European pros and College players. "I played against some guys who make $80,000 a year playing ball," said Noah. "A lot of them have been playing pro ball for ten years. It was a great time."

Noah had a chance to play in Italy, Slovenia, and Austria. "It was a great experience to see all the awesome sights. Who knows if I will get that chance again in my life."

Noah said that he has a chance to go to the Bahamas this summer to play more basketball. He is also planning a trip to Africa with the college. "We are going there for some work in Somalia. They need some help there and we are sending a group of men and women from the school. We hope we can do some good there."

Not bad for a kid from little ol' Fillmore, huh? Noah the son of Kathleen and Andy Aguirre from Fillmore played football, basketball, baseball, track & field, baseball, and volleyball for the Fillmore Flashes. He is one of the greatest athletes this great town has had. In football he was All-League, All-County, and was a big part of the team that went to the C.I.F. semi-finals in 2008. In basketball he was the League M.V.P. his Jr. and Sr. year. All-League his freshman and sophomore years, All-County, and All-C.I.F. his junior and senior years. He holds almost all of Fillmore High School’s records in basketball. He was also on the Championship team in 2009. In volleyball he was on the first team Fillmore ever had in 2008. And in 2009 he was a huge part of the League Championship team. He also was the Player of the Year in the league for volleyball in 2009. He did everything in sports but sell popcorn at halftime.

When I asked what he misses most at Fillmore he said, "The weather! It can get cold here. -50 with a wind chill. Now that's cold. I miss my family and friends. And oh yeah the good Mexican food. You cannot find that out here at all. And orange trees!"

This year Noah is again on the starting team for the Pipers of Hamline University. In his first year there he made the starting team about a quarter of the way through the season. His big highlight that year was to come to Cal. Lutheran in Thousand Oaks and take home first place in their basketball tournament in front of family and friends. He scored an average of 7.5 points per game in 2010. Last year the team went 16-11 on the season, then came in third place in their conference. And in the M.I.A.C. tournament they missed a chance to win it all by one game. That would have put them in the N.C.A.A. tournament. Noah did his part with a 10 point per game average.

"This is our year. N.C.A.A. tournament or it will be a big let down around here. We thank we have the team that can make it to the big dance this year," said Noah. "Our goals are high but we think we can do them."

Now tell me Fillmore, don't you think it would be awesome to see one of our very own playing in the March Madness! I for one will be glued to the TV. that night!

Noah said that he is getting along well in St. Paul. "The Twin Cities is a great place to be. The people are so nice here. They make you feel right at home. I have my own place to stay this year, and have made some great friends out here."

Noah is working on his degree in Social Justice, he will graduate in June of 2013."I will come back to California for graduate school after that. I hope I can do some good in this world." Knowing this young man the way I do, I know he will.

When I asked if he had anything he wanted to say, Noah said, "Yes I do. I want to say thank you to my family. They have always been a big support all my life to me. And I also want everybody to know what a big influence Chris Cone has been in my life. I still tell stories of him to my friends and teammates. I still hear him saying 'Be quick but don't hurry!' on the court. I love Coach Cone very much, and think of him all the time."
Noah I know he loves you too! He loved all of his players.

So with a lot of hard work in the classroom, and then in the gym this young Globe Trotter will live out all of his dreams. Good Luck Noah. You have a town standing behind you!

 
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