The entryway to Fillmore's new swimming pool complex has been paved, with curbs.
The entryway to Fillmore's new swimming pool complex has been paved, with curbs.
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The concrete floor of the swimming pool has been poured. It is now covered with a plastic sheeting in order to facilitate curing.
The concrete floor of the swimming pool has been poured. It is now covered with a plastic sheeting in order to facilitate curing.
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This photo was taken shortly before the pool's floor was poured. A heavy re-bar grid-work is in place to receive the concrete.
This photo was taken shortly before the pool's floor was poured. A heavy re-bar grid-work is in place to receive the concrete.
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This photo shows the entrance way to the pool complex before being recently paved.
This photo shows the entrance way to the pool complex before being recently paved.
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A different photo angle, looking East, of the swimming pool after the floor was poured.
A different photo angle, looking East, of the swimming pool after the floor was poured.
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Candlelight Installation Ceremony.
Candlelight Installation Ceremony.
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Shown above are Fillmore Lions President, Bill Edmunds and keynote speaker, Ted Fusco, Past International Director.
Shown above are Fillmore Lions President, Bill Edmunds and keynote speaker, Ted Fusco, Past International Director.
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“March of the 2008-2009 District Cabinet Officers” took place on Saturday, August 16, 2008, hosted by the
Fillmore Lions Club. The full day event held at the Veterans Memorial building was coordinated by Fillmore
Membership Chairman, Lion Jim Austin and his wife Phyllis, and included seminars and meetings. It concluded
with dinner, prizes and a Candlelight Ceremony installing District 4A-3 Officers. Nearly 100 were in attendance.

 


 

Secure free booth space for Sunday, November 9th , to sell two-dimensional Fine Art at the Fillmore Annual Home Tour sponsored by the Fillmore Historical Museum, 350 Main Street. A 10% commission will be charged. There are 10 booth spaces available indoors in the newly renovated Fillmore train depot, 4 spaces in the outdoor gazebo and 10’x10’ outdoor spaces on the depot grounds. Ribbons will be awarded. Set up and judging time 9-11, open time 11-4.
For applications: Luanne Perez 524-0925 or Joanne King 524-4904.

 


 
Fillmore High Alumni Association
Fillmore High Alumni Association

The Fillmore High Alumni newsletter, "Flashbacks" was put in the mail last Friday by the hard working group of volunteers made up of Joyce Basolo, Jane Johnson, Maxine Merry, who brought along her brother, J. C. Taylor, Jolene Stethem and Em Wendel. By the time you read this, hopefully you will have already received your copy of the August issue, but if not, please contact the alumni office at 524-0416 or at staff@FillmoreHighAlumni.com. Kathleen McCreary has done another wonderful job of putting together this issue, which includes letters regarding the Gritz Brothers of the 1960's, a great article from Doug Gibby about his days at Sespe Elementary, class reunion notices from Conway Spitler for the class of '38, Florene Campbell Ernst for the class of '48 and Bob Horn for the class of '58. A recap of the alumni dinner, along with a number of pictures of attendees at the dinner are also included. More pictures from that dinner will be appearing on the alumni website shortly, as well as in the November issue of "Flashbacks". Be sure to look for it, and if your subscription runs out this year, please send in your renewal before December 31.
The quarterly alumni board meeting was held Monday evening, August 18 at Mark Ortega's home with eight members in attendance. Two new members, Glenda DeJarnette and Tricia Urea-Gradias were elected as new members and were welcomed to the board of directors. The 2008 alumni dinner was discussed and all agreed it was a huge success.
The 2009 alumni dinner will be held Saturday, June 6 at the Memorial Building. Plans for this dinner will be discussed at a later meeting, but the dinner will be catered by Gary Laird, class of '76. The alumni scholarships were discussed, and continued discussion will take place at the Scholarship Committee meeting in September. Decisions will be made as to how the scholarships will be distributed and if more emphasis will be placed on the Continuation Grants. Work is progressing on getting the Shasta Daisies growing again on the school farm to be used once again on the Junior arches for graduation. The alumni association will again be present at the home football game between Fillmore and Santa Paula, to hand out information and memberships to alumni. The latest issue of the "Flashbacks" was handed out to each member present. The next board of directors meeting will be held on Monday, November 17.

 


 

2008 PiruFest set for Labor Day Weekend Attracts More Sponsors, Exhibitors and Events:
Event Planners report that Saturday, August 30th Festival continues to catch the attention for music, art, food and assortment of vendors and entertainment.
Planning and scheduling efforts for the 8th Annual PiruFest continue to take shape as this Saturday, August 30th event approaches. The day will kick off at noon and continue until 10 p.m. at the beautiful Piru Depot and Gazebo Plaza Park on Center Street in the historic downtown district. This year’s event will offer entertainment, an assortment of vendors, a horseshoe tournament, community art project and other activities that promise to be enjoyed by all ages.
The Piru Neighborhood Council, with support from private and community partners, organize this exciting annual festival. Event planners are proud to announce that other area organizations are joining to ensure this affair is a success. The Piru Petroleum Club, Lake Piru Recreation Area, Fillmore-Piru Citrus Association, Piru Parks Commission, Laverne Nursery, Rancho Temescal, Poncho’s Restaurant, Bennett’s Honey, Supervisor Kathy Long, Ventura County Redevelopment Agency, Pacific Beverage Company, and International Paper Company have come on board to support the day’s attractions.
The PiruFest 2008 Organizing Committee, chaired by Stephanie Acosta, continues to work with vendors and exhibitors to make this festival a memorable one. A just-announced exhibit and sponsorship by Lake Piru Recreation Area will include an opportunity for two lucky festivalgoers to win a half-day rental of one of their popular and brand new pontoon boats. Other exhibitors and vendors range from tasty food choices, local crafts, music, and popular clothing items. Health and nutritional representatives as well as educational resources available in the Heritage Valley will provide valuable information for sustaining a healthy community.
According to Committee Chairwoman Acosta, planning efforts are moving forward at a rapid pace as this Labor Day Weekend event nears. With this in mind, it will feature young performers from Inlakech Cultural Arts Center. These young performers are sure to bring the Piru Depot and landmark gazebo plaza to life as they gracefully dance, perform and entertain the crowd with their beautiful and rhythmic dances and music.
Later that evening, the popular Dan Torres and the Piru River Band will headline from 6-10 pm. Known for their variety of current and “oldie” tunes, Dan and his band always get the crowd on their feet and on the dance floor. They have performed in the valley for many years and have always included family, including wife Irma, their sons and other local artists. Torres and his band have a 30-year history of memorable shows, including past performances with Little Joe & La Familia among others. This year’s event will also showcase one of the band’s newest musicians. Their 10-year-old grandson, known locally as “D-3”, will join in on lively precision tunes showcasing his amazing percussion talents.
Throughout the day, a group of young students will embark on a community art project to transform a local wall from a graffiti target to a tasteful representation reflecting the area’s diverse and rich background. Students from Piru and Fillmore schools will get involved in the development and “hands-on” experience for this effort. This activity will take place along a section of the pedestrian trail that parallels the valley’s historic railroad line in Piru. Carlos Callejo, an experienced and recognized artist, will coordinate work on this project. Callejo was recently selected by the County of Ventura to develop a significant public art project along another Piru stretch of the trail.
All are invited to join in on what is sure to be a wonderful celebration of this unique and family-oriented town and its rich contributions to the region.

 


 
The Human Body
Conway Spitler
Conway Spitler

The human body is a machine that is full of wonder. Human body facts will leave you wondering why in the heck we were designed the way we were.
Scientists say the higher your I. Q. the more you dream.
The largest cell in the human body is the female egg and the male sperm.
You use 200 muscles to take one step.
A full bladder is roughly the size of a soft ball.
The human brain cell can hold five-times as much information as the Encyclopedia Britannica.
There are about one trillion bacteria on each of your feet
Your body gives off enough heat in 30 minutes to bring water to a boil.
Your teeth start growing six months before you are born.
When you are looking at someone your love, your pupils do the same when you are looking at someone you hate.
Your thumb is the same length of your nose.

Here are some statistics from 1903:

Average life expectancy in the U. S. was forty-seven (47).
Only 8% of the homes had telephones.
A three minute call from Denver to New York City cost eleven dollars. There were only ;8,000 cars in the U> S. and only 144 miles of paved roads. Sugar cost 4 cents a pound. Coffee was 15 cents a pound. Eggs were 14 cents a dozen. The five leading causes of death in the US were:
pneumonia and influenza
tuberculosis
diarrhea
heart disease
stroke
The American flag had only 45 stars.
The population of Las Vegas, Nevada, was 30.
Canned beer and iced tea had not been invented.
One in ten U. S. adults couldn't read or write.
Only 6% of all American had graduated from high school.
Just think what it will be like in the next 100 years.

 
Picking pumpkins at Faulkner Farms.
Picking pumpkins at Faulkner Farms.

Picking pumpkins, hayrides, a petting zoo, mini train rides, and live entertainment are just some of activities planned for the Pumpkin Patch & Harvest Festival at Faulkner Farm in Santa Paula. For four weekends in October, the historic Ventura County farm, nestled in a beautiful country setting, offers a bounty of delightful family activities. The month-long celebration is sponsored by the Santa Paula Rotary.
New this year is a giant trebuchet. Trebuchets were used in the Middle Ages to fling canon balls into or over walls surrounding towns. Instead of canon balls, the Pumpkin Patch trebuchet will launch pumpkins 150 to 200 feet in the air, landing with a splat in a designated area. "It should be quite a sight," says Mike Mobley, Santa Paula Rotary president.
A trip to the Faulkner Farm pumpkin patch will also provide plenty to eat: barbequed tri-tip, country chicken sandwiches, whole and slices of fresh baked pies, kettlecorn, caramel apples and lemonade will be served during the festival.
"Many long-time residents of Southern California have wonderful memories of picking pumpkins at Faulkner Farms," says Mobley. "It's been a tradition for more than 30 years. There's nothing like picking pumpkins on an actual farm surrounded by acres of open fields."
George and Roda Faulkner built their large Victorian era farmhouse and barn in 1894. Both buildings remain on the 27-acre property. The Hansen Agricultural Trust now owns the site.
This is the second year that the Santa Paula Rotary Club is sponsoring the pumpkin patch. Also lending support and volunteering are members of Future Farmers of America, 4-H, Youth Football, Isbell Jr. Condor Cancer Crushers, Latino Town Hall and others. "The Rotary is involved in many community activities," says Otto Schimmel, a Santa Paula Rotarian and harvest festival organizer. "Proceeds from the festival will go toward scholarships, junior achievement, Christmas baskets for the needy, Christmas stockings for convalescent home residents and ongoing financial support for healthcare, youth organizations, the arts and international projects."
The festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on October 4 and 5, 11 and 12, 18 and 19 and 25 and 26. Faulkner Farm is at 14292 W. Telegraph. For more information and directions, call 888-522-1884 or go to www.faulknerfarmpumpkinpatch.com.

 

The Rancho Camulos Museum took “Best of Show” at the Ventura County Fair this year. Each year the Associated Historical Societies and Museums of Ventura County sponsor and judge a collection of shadow boxes from individual museums members. Rancho Camulos Museum participates each year with Hillary Weireter organizing the exhibit.
This year the emphasis for Rancho Camulos was on docents who volunteer at the museum. This year Hillary was well rewarded with a massive blue ribbon for “Best of Show.” These exhibits are located in the Ag Building at the Fair.
The Rancho Camulos Docent Council is the volunteer group that does the hands-on work at the museum. Docents participate in everything from school field trips, gardening and tours and also support the Museum Board in membership and fundraising. New docents completing training last month were Vyonne Angel, Ken Asarch, Pat Hamilton, Mike Harutunian, Sue Myers, Jennifer Nichols and Connie Tripp. The next training class will be in January 2009. Anyone interested in joining this group is encouraged to call the museum at 521-1501. Over 40 members and families enjoyed the docent annual summer picnic last Sunday at the Museum. Lynda and Jerry Edmonds did the barbecue for the potluck. Members spent the time visiting and enjoying the grounds—things they are usually too busy to do.
The next regular bi-monthly docent business meeting will be August 23rd at the museum with plans for the fall book sale and “Ramona” event on the agenda.
The museum is open for tours on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 and by special appointment. For a nearby, interesting, historical site to entertain out-of-town visitors, consider an afternoon at Rancho Camulos Museum and gift shop.

 

District Attorney Gregory D. Totten issued a Consumer Protection Alert today to Ventura County residents regarding a series of recent mailings to county residents which appear to be in violation of the law. Within the last week, numerous residents have received mailings from entities with names like “Property Tax Reassessment” and “Property Tax Adjustment Service” which purport to offer to file a request for a property tax reassessment for a fee.
Because these solicitations did not inform the recipient that they can file their own request for reassessment with the Assessor’s Office without any fee, the solicitations are in violation of California law. Section 17537.9 of the Business and Professions Code requires solicitations from assessment appeal application filing services to include specific disclaimers that the solicitation is not associated with any government agency. Any outer envelope must bear on its face, in capital letters and in conspicuous and legible type, the following notice: “THIS IS NOT A GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT.” Further, the top of every page of the solicitation must bear, in 12 point bold print enclosed in a box formed by a heavy line, the following specific language:
THIS ASSESSMENT APPEAL APPLICATION FILING SERVICE IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY. IF YOU DISAGREE WITH THE ASSESSED VALUE OF YOUR PROPERTY, YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO AN INFORMAL ASSESSMENT REVIEW, AT NO COST, BY CONTACTING THE ASSESSOR'S OFFICE DIRECTLY. IF YOU AND THE ASSESSOR CANNOT AGREE TO THE VALUE OF THE PROPERTY OR IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO CONTACT THE ASSESSOR YOU CAN OBTAIN AND FILE AN APPLICATION, AT NO COST, ON YOUR OWN BEHALF. AN APPEALS BOARD HAS THE AUTHORITY TO RAISE PROPERTY VALUES (BUT IN NO CASE HIGHER THAN THE PROPOSITION 13 PROTECTED VALUE) AS WELL AS TO LOWER PROPERTY VALUES.
A failure to include either disclaimer is a misdemeanor.
The solicitations also violate Civil Code section 1716 by soliciting payment of money by another by means of a written statement or invoice, or any writing that reasonably could be considered a bill, invoice, or statement of account due. Section 1716 requires that each such solicitation bear a disclaimer that “THIS IS NOT A BILL. THIS IS A SOLICITATION. YOU ARE UNDER NO OBLIGATION TO PAY THE AMOUNT STATED ABOVE UNLESS YOU ACCEPT THIS OFFER,” and that the disclaimer shall be conspicuous boldface capital letters “at least as large, bold, and conspicuous as any other print on the face of the solicitation but no smaller than 30-point type.” A violation of section 1716 is a misdemeanor.
Residents who receive such letters may refer the letters to the District Attorney’s Office for review. Also, residents may obtain detailed information regarding property reassessment procedures by contacting the County Assessor’s Office at (805) 654-2161 or by reviewing the Ventura County Assessor’s Web site which discusses the process for submitting an Application for Decline in Value (http://assessor.countyofventura.org/taxsavings/declineinvalue.html). Residents can also view additional information and advice from the County Assessor’s Office regarding such solicitations at: http://assessor.countyofventura.org/pdfs/Press/PressRelease060308.pdf

 
 

September is Library Card Sign-up Month, and the Ventura County Library wants to make sure that your child has smartest card of all – a library card.

Studies show that children who are read to in the home and who use the library perform better in school and are more likely to continue to use the library as a source of lifetime learning.

“A library card has always been the most important school supply of all,” says Jackie Griffin, Director, Ventura County Library. “Kids can come to the library to get homework help and check out books, but they can also check out free music, DVDs and use the Internet to make after school life a little more fun. There’s a lot happening at the Ventura County Library community libraries.”

A recent study by the American Library Association also showed that families use libraries to spend time together. Forty-four percent of survey respondents report taking their children to the library for this reason.
Library Card Sign–up Month began in 1987. For more information on how you can sign up for your library card, visit your local community library.

The Ventura County Library community libraries include Avenue Library, Camarillo Library, Fillmore Library, E. P. Foster Library, Meiners Oaks Library, Oak Park Library, Oak View Library, Ojai Library, Piru Library, Ray D. Prueter Library, Saticoy Library, Simi Valley Library, Albert H. Soliz-El Rio Library, and H.P. Wright Library. The library is also open 24 hours a day, seven days a week at www.vencolibrary.org.

 
 
 
 

Bardsdale 4-H members had a great time at the Ventura County Fair and were awarded many ribbons. We would especially like to thank our generous livestock buyers: Mike’s Handyman Service for buying Brooke Aguirre’s pig, Santa Clara Valley Bank for Noah Aguirre’s pig, Gibbs Truck Center for Alexus Galassi’s heifer, Ellison Taub for Natalie Garnica’s pig, Williams Pipeline Contractors for Adrian Gonzales’ pig, Laura & Rigo Landeros for Timmy Klittich’s lamb, Redman Racing for Timmy Klittich’s turkey, Oxnard Lemon for Jessica Mayhew’s pig, AAA Propane for Michael Mayhew’s pig, Burns Equipment Service for Dillon Raye’s pig, Western Farm Service for Jessica Raye’s pig, BC Rincon Construction for Candace Stines pig, Aqua-Flo Supply for Tabitha Tucker’s lamb, and Ventura Rental Center for Hilary Vigil’s pig.

Four of our members were 1st place weight class winners in swine: Noah Aguirre, Sonya Gonzales, Jessica Raye, and Candace Stines.
Michael Mayhew won 3rd in his class in the Swine Barrow show and 5th in his market class. Jessica Mayhew placed 4th in her market class and in the Barrow show. Alexus Galassi placed 2nd in her heifer class and Brooke Aguirre placed 3rd in her swine class.

We had several kids place in showmanship where the member is judged on their ability to present their animal. Tabitha Tucker won 2nd in Junior Lamb Showmanship, Alexus Galassi won 4th in Heifer, Noah Aguirre won 5th in Senior Swine, Brooke Aguirre won 8th in Junior Swine, Natalie Garnica won 5th in Novice Swine, and Danny Klittich placed 2nd in Adult Showmanship. Primary member Aubree Duncan placed 1st in the Pygmy Goat costume contest.

In the Youth Building, many ribbons(too numerous to list them all) were won by members of the Arts and Crafts project and Woodworking project. Six girls presented table settings: 1st places Tabitha Tucker and Brooke Aguirre, 2nd places Candace Stines and Alexus Galassi, and primary participation Aubree Duncan and Chloe Stines. Timmy Klittich received a Best of Class for his educational turkey poster and Candace Stines received a Best of Class for her pig sign.

Everyone had a great time at the fair and camping at the beach. It was fun to support our fellow members in all the events and competitions. We hope you were able to attend the Fair too and see some of our entries.

 

The Rancho Camulos Museum took “Best of Show” at the Ventura County Fair this year. Each year the Associated Historical Societies and Museums of Ventura County sponsor and judge a collection of shadow boxes from individual museums members. Rancho Camulos Museum participates each year with Hillary Weireter organizing the exhibit.
This year the emphasis for Rancho Camulos was on docents who volunteer at the museum. This year Hillary was well rewarded with a massive blue ribbon for “Best of Show.” These exhibits are located in the Ag Building at the Fair.
The Rancho Camulos Docent Council is the volunteer group that does the hands-on work at the museum. Docents participate in everything from school field trips, gardening and tours and also support the Museum Board in membership and fundraising. New docents completing training last month were Vyonne Angel, Ken Asarch, Pat Hamilton, Mike Harutunian, Sue Myers, Jennifer Nichols and Connie Tripp. The next training class will be in January 2009. Anyone interested in joining this group is encouraged to call the museum at 521-1501. Over 40 members and families enjoyed the docent annual summer picnic last Sunday at the Museum. Lynda and Jerry Edmonds did the barbecue for the potluck. Members spent the time visiting and enjoying the grounds—things they are usually too busy to do.
The next regular bi-monthly docent business meeting will be August 23rd at the museum with plans for the fall book sale and “Ramona” event on the agenda.
The museum is open for tours on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 and by special appointment. For a nearby, interesting, historical site to entertain out-of-town visitors, consider an afternoon at Rancho Camulos Museum and gift shop.

 

The Piru Neighborhood Council announces Saturday, August 30th for this year’s annual PiruFest. This annual event, set for the 2008 Labor Day Weekend, provides an opportunity to celebrate our community with activities for the young and old alike, and welcomes visitors to the Santa Clara River/Heritage Valley region.

Activities will stretch from locations at the historic Warring Park to the downtown Depot and Gazebo Park. A community art project featuring local youth will be underway on the pedestrian trail that links these two nearby parks.

These two venues will offer amusement attractions, music, a horseshoe tournament, entertainment, food and crafts booths, as well as exciting displays and demonstrations.

Festivities will kick off at noon and continue until 10 pm. Planned activities will include performances by youth musicians, Native American Dancers and the ever-popular “Dan Torres and Piru River Band” at the Piru Depot and Gazebo Park. Amusement attractions and youth recreational activities will be featured at Warring Park throughout the day.

To reserve a booth, vendors should contact Tiffany Chapman at 805-317-1723. Applications are also available at “U Scream Ice Cream”, located at the corner of Main and Center Streets in downtown Piru.

Event Information: Stephanie Acosta (805) 844-0121
Vendor/Info Booths: Tiffany Chapman (805) 317-1723
Stay tuned for more details!!

 
Refuse collection in Fillmore delayed one day for Labor Day

In observance of the Labor Day holiday, employees of Santa Clara Valley Disposal will be taking the day off on Monday, Sept. 1. As a result, Fillmore city residential customers will have their trash and recyclables collected one day later than usual, on Saturday, Sept. 6. The regular Friday collection schedule will resume the following week.
For more information, call 647-1414.

 
Conway Spitler
Conway Spitler

Together, we can speak out against violence and make effective changes in our country.
How?
Respect all living beings--people and animals.
Get involved in school, city, and country.
Spend quality time with your family without turning on the television.
Support clean up campaigns.
Respect other people's differences.
If you know someone who may need help, listen to them and suggest appropriate resources.
Register to vote and contact your legislators if they are supporting or not supporting laws that enforce violence prevention.
Get to know your neighbors.
Write letters to the editors of the local papers.
Remember it takes each of us to make a difference in our country. Get information and get involved?

Class of ’38 Reunion Epistle
It is so interesting, at least to me, how a little “effort” goes a long way in effecting people. The large booklet, prepared for the Class of ’38 70th anniversary reunion, has caused a great “ripple” is this old world of ours.
The reunion booklet was loaned to a friend, living in the Canyon Country area, who taught with me at Canyon High School. After looking the booklet over, Art saw his friend, Clyde Spencer. Art in turn let his son-in-law look at
the booklet and “lo and behold” the son-in law saw his father, Clyde Spencer, who was a member of the 1938 class.
Of course, I am delighted to present the reunion booklet to Clyde’s son! It does show that this is a small world if you look around.

 

August 5, 2008, - Cal Citrus Packing Co. Inc, a well-known grower/shipper in the California citrus industry, is the newest member of Sunkist Growers, the grower-owned citrus marketing cooperative headquartered in Sherman Oaks, California.

"We’re looking forward to our affiliation with Sunkist,” said Jerry Luallen, President of Cal Citrus. “We have an excellent product and Sunkist has an excellent marketing network and a brand name that is known around the world. Sunkist has been streamlining operations, reducing costs and greatly expanding the opportunities it offers to growers and shippers. We’ve watched the changes and seen the results and we’re excited about joining Sunkist and enjoying the benefits of membership.”

Cal Citrus is a premier grower, packer and shipper of fresh citrus, headquartered in Lindsay, California in the heart of California's Central Valley. With a product list that includes Navel and Valencia oranges, and lemons, Cal Citrus brings 2,000 acres of citrus into the Sunkist system. The fruit will continue to be packed under the familiar Portokali, Seabiscuit, Sugar Test, Jungle Cat, Golden Boy and My Goodness labels – and now it will also wear the Sunkist brand.

"We're extremely pleased to welcome Cal Citrus into Sunkist," said Russ Hanlin, Sunkist’s President-Elect. "They are a very experienced and respected grower and packer, known for their customer service. The affiliation brings to our system a large supply quality citrus and a philosophy of excellence that matches our own." Cal Citrus is projected to add 40,000 field cartons of lemons, 1.1 million field cartons of Navels and 125,000 field cartons of Valencias to Sunkist’s portfolio for the 2008-09 season.

“We have been growing and harvesting for nearly a century and packing and shipping since the 1950s.” said Luallen. “We have years of experience and dedication in producing a great product.”

Cal Citrus traces its beginning to the founding of Luallen Soil Service, which began purchasing a base of investor ranches that soon grew to 1,500 acres. As the company continued to grow it purchased a packinghouse in 1969, establishing Cal Citrus Packing Company. In 1976, Cal Citrus bought the former Waddel Packing in Lindsay and in 1981 it established a third packinghouse, also in Lindsay, which now houses the company’s current citrus bagging operation.

“We are very proud of our Central California ‘Lindsay Citrus Belt’ heritage,” said Luallen, “and we are committed to maintaining our reputation of quality and integrity and expanding our marketing reach through Sunkist.”